Apple cuts prices & upgrades iCloud storage plans, eliminates 500GB option

Posted:
in iCloud edited September 2015
As a part of sweeping changes to its product lineup, Apple has also restructed the prices and tiers for iCloud storage upgrades, making the service more competitive with alternatives like Google Drive.




While the default amount of storage is still just 5 gigabytes, paying 99 cents a month will now get a subscriber 50 gigabytes of storage instead of 20. Apple has also scaled back the prices for its 200-gigabyte and 1-terabyte tiers, adjusting them from $3.99 and $19.99 to $2.99 and $9.99, respectively.

In the process Apple has eliminated a 500-gigabyte option, which previously cost as much as the new 1-terabyte level.

Google Drive, by comparison, offers 15 gigabytes for free, and 100 gigabytes for $1.99 a month. Its 1 terabyte plan is identical to Apple's, however. Both companies are currently trumped by Microsoft's OneDrive, which offers 1 terabyte and an Office 365 subscription for $6.99.

Apple announced the changes during its Wednesday press event, but has yet to update its official pricing guide.

Improving iCloud storage may be necessary for a few reasons. On top of competitiveness, many people are backing up multiple devices to iCloud, and even a single iPhone backup can consume several gigabytes. With iCloud Drive, Apple has also turned the service into a more open and easily browsable storage platform. An iCloud Drive app will come preloaded with iOS 9 when the latter launches on Sept. 16.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 61
    It's more competitive; however for the same $10 a month you can get five installs of Office 365 and 1TB of OneDrive space.
  • Reply 2 of 61
    In Canada, I still see the old prices... I'm currently on 200gb for 3.99$/month, but 50gb is more than enough for me, for now.

    Are the new prices only for the US?
  • Reply 3 of 61
    4fx4fx Posts: 258member
    Does this work with family sharing? Or is it per iCloud account only?
  • Reply 4 of 61
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    Can I back up my iPad and iPhone to OneDrive?
  • Reply 5 of 61

    For me this is a great deal and sorely needed.  I have 4 devices backed up on iCloud and pay for the 20 gb.  Adding 30 gb allow me to include more things in the backups and iCloud Drive. Thanks Apple.

  • Reply 6 of 61
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    I would like to know too. I have family sharing enabled but I haven't checked the other members to see if they can use my upgraded space. I hope so.
  • Reply 7 of 61

    Im already paying 99 cents a month, because the default storage just doesn't cut it if somebody has a lot of devices, but it's nice that they bumped the 20 GB up to 50 GB for the same 99 cents!:smokey:

  • Reply 8 of 61
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,589member
    An iCloud app in IOS9 will be welcome. I also hope that IOS Apps such as Numbers will b able to see deeper than one level down. At the moment any folder containing another folder is not visible.
  • Reply 9 of 61
    I'm pretty sure Apple's cloud plan does not compress or alter your original photos in any way..... Sure there are competitors, but what do they do to your photos? Theres more than price that should be considered while evaluating all options.
  • Reply 10 of 61
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,363member
    I'm assuming there is a way to limit video to 1080p on the 6S? Obviously 4K video and 12mp photos, including "motion photos", are going to take up a lot more room in iCloud Photos storage, necessitating the change.
  • Reply 11 of 61
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by shen View Post



    Can I back up my iPad and iPhone to OneDrive?

    You can back up photos and videos to OneDrive. In fact, last I checked, when you launch OneDrive for the first time, it asks you if you want to back up your photos and videos and if you agree, they give you an extra 3GB of space for the free in addition to the 15GB you already get (18GB total for free).

     

    -kpluck

  • Reply 12 of 61

    Does iCloud file storage mimic a traditional file system that lets you use one folder to hold documents of different types: (a) written docs, (b) spreadsheets, (c) PDFs, etc.

     

    For Apple's push into the enterprise, this absence within the iPad itself has always seemed a major impediment to me.  In a traditional Mac or PC file system, it's convenient to create a folder for a project (e.g., "New Kitchen") and then use that folder to store all artifacts related to that project. Since iOS traditionally allows access to documents via the app that created them (vs. via a general purpose file system windows), it seemed hard to combine artifacts in a single easily-accessible place.

  • Reply 13 of 61

    I hope Apple updates the storage options soon so I can upgrade to the 50gb plan. I think that's a good deal for 99 cents. 

  • Reply 14 of 61
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,589member
    shen wrote: »
    I would like to know too. I have family sharing enabled but I haven't checked the other members to see if they can use my upgraded space. I hope so.
    We have family sharing and I pay 99 cents per account within that package for 20gb each. So no, unless it has changed now. 99 cent per account is so low it makes no difference. The only change I'd like to see is the ability to pay annually. As it is I get 4 emails per month telling me that 99 cents has been charged to my account. The word for that is Spam, in my book.
  • Reply 15 of 61
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,589member
    slprescott wrote: »
    Does iCloud file storage mimic a traditional file system that lets you use one folder to hold documents of different types: (a) written docs, (b) spreadsheets, (c) PDFs, etc.

    For Apple's push into the enterprise, this absence within the iPad itself has always seemed a major impediment to me.  In a traditional Mac or PC file system, it's convenient to create a folder for a project (e.g., "New Kitchen") and then use that folder to store all artifacts related to that project. Since iOS traditionally allows access to documents via the app that created them (vs. via a general purpose file system windows), it seemed hard to combine artifacts in a single easily-accessible place.

    The iCloud folder on a OSX system does exactly that. It contains a folder for each app, but you are also able to save whatever else in your own folders. At the moment that file structure is not visible on an IOS device but I assume this will change with the new iCloud app is IOS 9. At present you are able to create a hierarchy of folders within the iWorks App folders, though this hierarchy is not visible on an IOS device. Hopefully this too will change.
  • Reply 16 of 61
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slprescott View Post

     

    Does iCloud file storage mimic a traditional file system that lets you use one folder to hold documents of different types: (a) written docs, (b) spreadsheets, (c) PDFs, etc.

     

    For Apple's push into the enterprise, this absence within the iPad itself has always seemed a major impediment to me.  In a traditional Mac or PC file system, it's convenient to create a folder for a project (e.g., "New Kitchen") and then use that folder to store all artifacts related to that project. Since iOS traditionally allows access to documents via the app that created them (vs. via a general purpose file system windows), it seemed hard to combine artifacts in a single easily-accessible place.




    It'd be nice to see tags start become more prominent, then it won't matter physical location or layout, you'll be able to tag a "project" and all its associated files, and where they reside, you won't care. Let the OS take care of that, local, cloud, network, who cares, as long as you can access them and sort, list and view them. I thought when tagging hit OS X we might begin to see Apple take advantage of this paradigm a bit more, it seems much more future friendly and legacy cutting, moving away from the c:\program files\ structure of data organisation, which is so yesterday.

     

    That said, I hope that the iCloud Drive app begin to mimic Dropbox a bit more myself, I could then dump Dropbox, pay .99/month and have plenty of room for everything which currently is spread across SpiderOak, Dropbox and iCloud, as well as my network NAS.

  • Reply 17 of 61
    iCloud Drive sucks. No feedback on what has been uploaded and what hasn't. I've tested it side by side with Dropbox. Dropbox syncs instantly. iCloud Drive? It might sync. Or you might need to wait a while. It's like nothing has changed since iDisk.

    Lower prices are great, but working services are better. I pay for iCloud storage so I can use photo library. Too bad photo library totally nuked my photos and now is inaccessible for another 18 days while it does whatever it does. I spent a while on the phone with apple care, even escalated up to the engineers, before finally giving up.

    Pay for Dropbox. Pay for google drive. Pay for one drive. Skip iCloud.
  • Reply 18 of 61
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by paxman View Post





    We have family sharing and I pay 99 cents per account within that package for 20gb each. So no, unless it has changed now. 99 cent per account is so low it makes no difference. The only change I'd like to see is the ability to pay annually.

    My account is billed annually

  • Reply 19 of 61
    what do people backup to iCloud? I synch my phone to my Mac. What would I gain by backing it up to iCloud?
  • Reply 20 of 61
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by schlack View Post



    what do people backup to iCloud? I synch my phone to my Mac. What would I gain by backing it up to iCloud?

    Double backups for one.

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