Japan's major architecture, engineering firms going "all iPad" in support of Apple, Inc. iOS enterpr

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  • Reply 21 of 28
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

     

     

     London hotel – it's 38 Pounds for the breakfast buffet where I am normally staying),


    You are clearly being ripped off which is not unusual for some of the major West End/City hotels. There are thousands of Cafe's in London that will do you a Full English for an awful lot less than that price.

    {my other half works at a hotel on Park Lane and I know that they charge a lot less than that for brekkie}

    Get out of the Hotel Bubble.

  • Reply 22 of 28
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,965member
    my workplace is pushing hard for surface pro in place of iPads. And some (cheaper than surface pro) massive HP product that weighs nearly 2 kgs!

    what users want doesn't matter!
  • Reply 23 of 28

    iOS being the second biggest mobile platform in terms of volume and first in terms of developers remuneration. iOS apps development are a part of improving business, setting signature presence and building a great brand. iOS application development companies in India, are now working for some of the top businesses and leading brand. Custom iOS apps are the flavour as of now.

    http://www.mobileapptelligence.com/ios-application-development.html

  • Reply 24 of 28
    inklinginkling Posts: 731member
    Not all this will be as good as it is likely to be with architecture and construction, where the key need is to move information about quickly and accurately.

    Some of these IBM/Apple schemes attempt to do with white-collar professionals what the infamous Taylorism did to factory workers in the era of Henry Ford. They try to create worker productivity metrics that can be used to drive employees to work ever harder under threat of being fired. Even today, relations between the Big Three automakers and UAW workers remain bad thanks to attitudes established nearly a century ago.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_management

    If you read the recent NY Times article on how Amazon treats its management and software developers, you've seen an example of that. Employees are punished not based on making bad decisions but on how quickly they respond to emails and the like. Creating metrics for decisions is difficult. Creating metrics for email response isn't. One result of the latter are Amazon staff forced to sit at home late at night answering emails that could easily wait until the next day. That pressure to perform in ways that can be measured results in low morale, high turnover, and more mistakes.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/technology/inside-amazon-wrestling-big-ideas-in-a-bruising-workplace.html

    Examining an area I understand, I checked out IBM's healthcare products for nursing staff and found them worse than useless. They're a hospital administrator's idea of what nursing staff need%u2014closely monitored (by themselves) to-do lists ranked by priority. That's the metrics monster applied to an area where it works especially poorly%u2014medical care. IBM's nursing apps are not what nurses need, which are tools to make their work more efficient, such as effective, staff-to-staff communication tools. The result will be a disaster for already troubled nurse morale.

    --Michael W. Perry, author of Senior Nurse Mentor: Curing What Ails Hospital Nursing Morale
  • Reply 25 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tmay View Post

     

    The first MCAD package that I am aware that supports the iPad Pro (they are committed to it) is a cloud based package called Onshape;

     

    https://www.onshape.com/features-and-pricing

     

    I'm moving from SolidWorks to Autodesk Inventor HSM Pro for a number of reasons, but one is that Autodesk seems to "get" mobile better than Dassault Systemes, I expect Fusion 360, their Cloud based MCAD package, to support the iPad Pro as well. Autodesk will also be very supportive of the iPad Pro for BIM and Architectural Design.

     

    Hoping for some Industrial Design apps on the iPad Pro.




    Consider yourself lucky!  In my first year of Engineering (1987) I was part of the first class (at the university I attended) that used AutoCAD in drafting.  I believe it was R7 or R8, so DOS-based, somewhat slow but still amazing!  Our semester-final project was to build an AutoLISP project; I created a guitar builder and customizer.  Must have been the hair-metal era because I was one of four in the class that chose that subject.

  • Reply 26 of 28
    That's pretty interesting, Apple has been doing amazing stuff for creative professionals over the years. As an animator, I'm really excited to try out the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil.
  • Reply 27 of 28
    ksecksec Posts: 1,567member
    My Biggest Problem with IBM is that they make crap software. Lotus, the new Mail ( cant remember what's called ) and their ERP / CRM.

    Truth to be told, most Enterprise Software are crap. But IBM happens to be one of the worst of them all.
  • Reply 28 of 28
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,159member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rpeters View Post

     



    Consider yourself lucky!  In my first year of Engineering (1987) I was part of the first class (at the university I attended) that used AutoCAD in drafting.  I believe it was R7 or R8, so DOS-based, somewhat slow but still amazing!  Our semester-final project was to build an AutoLISP project; I created a guitar builder and customizer.  Must have been the hair-metal era because I was one of four in the class that chose that subject.


    I do, but you should know that my first computer experience was hollerith cards that we dropped off at the computing center and teletypes that we used later; freshman year 1972.

     

    My recollection is that I was using a slide rule through at least my sophomore year; when engineering students were allowed to use calculators for tests. I used to borrow (on weekends) an HP 65 that my dad used in his job (civil engineering); they also had an HP 9815 or 9820 that was one of the early programmable desktop calculators. I started with a Commodore scientific calculator (SR-1400 possibly), which failed pretty early, and later went to a TI SR-52 followed by a TI-59 that I got in lieu of a repair of the SR-52. I have a TI-59 emulator in my iPhone for fun.

     

    My first pass at CAD was MacDraw (I got my first Mac, a 128 which I later upgraded to a 512) and later MiniCAD which morphed into VectorWorks. Pretty much missed AutoCAD until I took some classes as a grad student, but my then, I was more interested in the manufacturing end of things, eventually throwing down on Pro/E 8, then replacing that with SolidWorks, and now Inventor. 

     

    I want to live long enough to see humans living on Mars; all of you that can make that happen need to get back to work!

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