Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton says Apple's Tim Cook 'omitted critical facts' in encryption stance

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  • Reply 81 of 103
    jdw said:
    ...Him and 46 other Republican senators subverting the President while in critical negotiations with a foreign power those senators consider "the enemy." This is what passes for patriotism in the GOP today.
    Let's leave specific political parties out of this. The Donkeys are just as guilty of expanding Big Brother as the Elephants are — yes, even on the military front. There can be no debate about that at all. Furthermore, traditionalist Republicans (i.e., Goldwater style Libertarians) like Ron and Rand Paul never have supported this kind of thing, have actually been vocally against it, and they are both in the Elephant party, proving the entire GOP cannot be entirely cast in the ideological fire.
    If you'll pardon me for saying so, that's a false equivalency. Republican presidents started the first gulf war, and the second, which by the way is the longest war in American history. It was a Republican president who created DHS, and who greatly expanded the power of the NSA. It was a Republican president who invaded a country that had nothing to do with 9/11. It was a Republican president who caused the creation of Al Qaeda, and a different Republican president who caused the creation of ISIS/ISIL/Daesh. Democrats are not just as guilty as Republicans, they simply clean up the messes left behind by Republicans.

    Be that as it may, Hillary Clinton is completely wrong on this.
    jb210lostkiwicnocbuiwvdirkpunkndrublichighaciditypropod
  • Reply 82 of 103
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,391member
    macsimcon said:
    jdw said:
    Let's leave specific political parties out of this. The Donkeys are just as guilty of expanding Big Brother as the Elephants are — yes, even on the military front. There can be no debate about that at all. Furthermore, traditionalist Republicans (i.e., Goldwater style Libertarians) like Ron and Rand Paul never have supported this kind of thing, have actually been vocally against it, and they are both in the Elephant party, proving the entire GOP cannot be entirely cast in the ideological fire.
    If you'll pardon me for saying so, that's a false equivalency....

    Be that as it may, Hillary Clinton is completely wrong on this.
    Glad we agree.  :-)

    Apple's right on encryption.  Big Brother is wrong.  Period.
    lostkiwisandorSpamSandwichhighaciditythubsch
  • Reply 83 of 103
    Another lawmaker who doesn't understand that hackers, foreign state-sponsored intruders, and technical tourists will all be attracted inevitably and actively to any backdoor. No Backdoors! Weaken the encryption for law enforcement and it will weaken everyone's privacy irreversibly and unavoidably. Sen. Cotton has already proved he doesn't understand the conduct of diplomacy, and now he proves he has no understanding of information security.
    lostkiwihighacidityiosenthusiast
  • Reply 84 of 103
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member

    macsimcon said:
    Oh for crying out loud, President Obama didn't submit it as a treaty, it's an Executive Agreement.
    In that event, it is not binding on any part of the government, not even the President. Simply pointing that out in a letter is not "treason" or illegal. Calling it an "Executive Agreement" is an attempt to make an end run around the Constitution's requirement that the Senate must sign off on the President negotiating with other nations.
    Senate signs off on treaties not "negotiations". 
    "Article. II.

    Section. 1.

    The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows.

    ...

    Article II, Section 2:
    "He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
    edited December 2015 thubsch
  • Reply 85 of 103
    mactoid said:
    Why is it that whenever the GOP wants to trounce even more of the Bill of Rights, they trot out "Child Pornography"?? it's like the boogey-man in the closet.  
    Because many of them are extremely familiar with it.
    highacidityiosenthusiast
  • Reply 86 of 103
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,556member
    A domestic Stalinist.
    iosenthusiast
  • Reply 87 of 103
    Hey Appleinsider

    What "critical facts" is he saying were omitted? You never specified, yet your articles title states there were specific facts omitted, yet you didn't report what they were. Learn what a headline is for, or hire some reporters.

      -Randy 
  • Reply 88 of 103
    In a statement issued on Monday, U.S. Senator Tom Cotton, a Republican from Arkansas, criticized Tim Cook for his defense of strong encryption during a 60 Minutes interview, claiming that the Apple CEO had "omitted critical facts."




    "As a society, we don't allow phone companies to design their systems to avoid lawful, court-ordered searches," Cotton said in the statement. "If we apply a different legal standard to companies like Apple, Google, and Facebook, we can expect them to become the preferred messaging services of child pornographers, drug traffickers, and terrorists alike -- which neither these companies nor law enforcement want."

    During the 60 Minutes piece, Cook argued against government-mandated backdoors in encryption. The executive maintained a long-held position that if Apple coded deliberate holes for U.S. law enforcement and spy agencies, those holes could also be exploited by malicious hackers, including governments wanting to use the Internet against their own citizens.

    Apple and other corporations have come under increasing fire from U.S. government officials concerned they will no longer be able to intercept communications from criminals or terrorists. The encryption present in iOS 8 and 9, for instance, is so strong that Apple says it can't break it, even when served with a warrant.

    One of the most vocal critics of Apple's policy has been FBI director James Comey. His efforts suffered a setback when the Obama administration decided not to force decryption, although during an October hearing, Comey said that talks with corporations had become "increasingly productive" and less venomous.
    The only fact you need is if you open a backdoor it will open it to everyone which will lead to everyone's data being vulnerable and could cause massive identity theft and fraud. Think about that Senator.
    highacidity
  • Reply 89 of 103
    This senator is dangerously stupid guy.. Benjamin Franklin said it simple; Those who give away their freedom rights of privacy, to receive more security, deserve neither freedom nor liberty.!! Mr stupido senator- please read the constitution and stop meddling into our electronics!!
    highacidityiosenthusiast
  • Reply 90 of 103
    macsimcon said:

    If you'll pardon me for saying so, that's a false equivalency. Republican presidents started the first gulf war, and the second, which by the way is the longest war in American history. It was a Republican president who created DHS, and who greatly expanded the power of the NSA. It was a Republican president who invaded a country that had nothing to do with 9/11. It was a Republican president who caused the creation of Al Qaeda, and a different Republican president who caused the creation of ISIS/ISIL/Daesh. Democrats are not just as guilty as Republicans, they simply clean up the messes left behind by Republicans.
    I'm not willing to pardon you for such willful inaccuracy. For example, the first Gulf War was not started by Republicans, it was started by Saddam Hussein invading Kuwait. And ISIS was formed in the power vacuum formed by Obama's removal of Gaddafi.
    tallest skil
  • Reply 91 of 103
    Anything coming from the mouth of Tom Cotton should be taken with a grain of salt, considering he's part of the racist, war-mongering, surveillance-state, climate change denying, anti-science faction of the Republican party. This was the jackass who penned a letter to Iran undermining the president's ongoing negotiations (for which he should be prosecuted for treason.) He is in favor of the US government torturing prisoners and has called for "adding more beds" to Guantanamo instead of shutting it down. 
    punkndrublichighacidityiosenthusiast
  • Reply 92 of 103
    Reasonable or not, logical or not. When a terrorist incident involves an iphone Apple will be forced by new laws passed to have a front door as well as a back door. People need to wake up and vote these ignorant backward people out of office.
    punkndrublichighacidity
  • Reply 93 of 103
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Who says you have to give anyone the key? Is it any different than when the police execute a search warrant on a home? They're allowed in but that doesn't give them the key to the residence nor permission to go back in whenever they feel like it. 
    You need an encryption key for digital devices because battering rams have a way of making digital data unrecoverable.
    You can have rolling encryption keys. A key that worked today won't work again in a million years. 
  • Reply 94 of 103
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    macsimcon said:
    Who says you have to give anyone the key? Is it any different than when the police execute a search warrant on a home? They're allowed in but that doesn't give them the key to the residence nor permission to go back in whenever they feel like it. 
    And I think this is Comey's argument: upon issuance of a warrant, get the individual to decrypt the covered data, and hand that data over to the Justice Department. That way, the user's key is never divulged to anyone.

    Except...that raises a fifth amendment question that hasn't been settled yet.
    Where does self incriminating start, and finish? 
  • Reply 95 of 103
    You can have rolling encryption keys. A key that worked today won't work again in a million years. 
    Every implementation I've seen of such a system uses some sort of device to keep the current key in sync. It's still a key that can be stolen. In this case it's a physical device.
  • Reply 96 of 103
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 2,015member
    mac_128 said:
    this guys is dangerous. For those who have forgotten, he essentially committed treason by co-authoring the letter telling Iran that any deal they struck with President would be reversed by congress as soon Obama leaves office.
    The letter sent to Iran was not treasonous.    Get your facts straight.   It just informed and reinforced to Iran the facts of how the government works, which is that treaties need to be ratified by the Senate.

    tallest skil
  • Reply 97 of 103
    pmcdpmcd Posts: 396member
    techlover said:
    The fact of the matter is that of all the ways to die in the world, the chances of being killed by a terrorist are extremely small.

    You are more far more likely to be killed by a police officer than by a terrorist. 

    I'd rather take my chances with the terrorists and have rock solid encryption available.
    I suppose assigning probabilities to various methods of demise, assuming it's even meaningful, would depend on where you lived. Like it or not, many people are afraid and you don't want Apple to suddenly be viewed as a preferred tool of terrorists. One would hope that they have some plan of getting off their addiction to iPhone revenues.
  • Reply 98 of 103
    pmcdpmcd Posts: 396member
    macsimcon said:

    Democrats are not just as guilty as Republicans, they simply clean up the messes left behind by Republicans.
    Like the Vietnam war?
  • Reply 99 of 103
    This is the uninformed attack on what they don't understand. The Clipper chip failed because it had backdoors encryption with key escrow with the government. The Clipper chip key exchange protocol was found to be very flawed and allowed key recovery of the backdoors key by brute force over a sixteen bit field. Next up, Jupiter networks, a government supplier and with a backdoors in their equipment. Now discovered. That would be the network switches used in many government network systems. Now with publicly disclosed accounts that allow management of the switches. So, any backdoors that law enforcement can marginally justify. They are vectors for converting real security into security theatre. That is to say, they cause a system that as secure to become insecure. And they potentially extend to the business and other trade secret information, personal details, calendar events, and more, now exposed to the government at traffic stops to more general offenses. Constitutionally the US enjoys a specific protection for search and seizure. It takes due process to relax that protection and allow the government to intrude. With a backdoors built in, law enforcement will take advantage. And much worse, your presumed private details will be available through hacking by malicious actors. Eve never had it so good.
    highacidity
  • Reply 100 of 103
    macsimcon said:

    ....
    I'm not willing to pardon you for such willful inaccuracy. For example, the first Gulf War was not started by Republicans, it was started by Saddam Hussein invading Kuwait. And ISIS was formed in the power vacuum formed by Bush's removal of Saddam, & the failure of Western-backed governments post-war.

    Fixed it for you.

    Islamic State of Iraq & Syria (ISIS) has nothing to do with Libya. Its birth dates back to the late '90s (what a coincidence!)
    Oil-family warmongering doesn't fix things in the longterm.
     

    edited December 2015 highaciditythubsch
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