Apple to source iPhone OLEDs from Samsung and LG, report says

Posted:
in iPhone edited December 2015
Adding to a growing number of rumors claiming iPhones will soon integrate OLED display technology, a report out of South Korea claims Apple is close finalizing a supply agreement that will see both Samsung and LG Display provide the necessary panels for the future handsets.




Citing unnamed industry sources, the Electronic Times on Wednesday local Korea time said Apple is close to reaching a definitive supply agreement with the display arms of Samsung and LG, both of which have experience in producing flexible OLED panels. LG is already supplying OLED products for Apple Watch and is rumored to be the sole supplier for Apple's next-gen wearable.

The two Korean companies are expected to inject some 15 trillion won (about $12.8 billion) in capital expenditures over the next two to three years to build out production facilities capable of churning out OLED panels in sufficient numbers to meet traditionally strong iPhone demand. Apple is said to be helping out with equipment costs, but the report failed to offer specifics.

LG, which will repurpose existing LCD production lines to reduce costs, is reportedly aiming to move from a current 4.5G manufacturing process to sixth-generation systems, but production yields are in question as the technology is as yet untested. Samsung, also thought to be supplying Apple Watch OLEDs, figures into the equation, but is expected to net 30 percent fewer orders than LG.

According to sources, negotiations were drawn out in part because Apple drove a hard bargain to push Samsung to accept low single-digit margins on its OLED sales.

Apple has long been rumored to switch away from LCDs to OLED modules for its flagship smartphone, with speculation growing more urgent since competitor Samsung adopted the display tech. As usual the iPhone maker took a wait and see approach and just this year introduced its first OLED product in Apple Watch. In June, a rumor suggested Apple was looking to adopt flexible OLED displays in 2018, a timeframe that lines up nicely with today's report.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    Complete BS of course.  
  • Reply 2 of 34
    I hope not cause OLED's have zero visibility in sunlight. 
  • Reply 3 of 34
    I hope not cause OLED's have zero visibility in sunlight. 
    Educate yourself on modern OLED displays.
    clemynxcnocbui
  • Reply 4 of 34
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    Finally OLED displays on iPhones !!
  • Reply 5 of 34
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,369member
    staticx57 said:
    I hope not cause OLED's have zero visibility in sunlight. 
    Educate yourself on modern OLED displays.
    Which have zero visibility in sun light.  I wouldn't be surprised to find Apple jumping right past OLED's to a new technology.   In any event I'm not convinced OLED's are that much better than LCD's.  
  • Reply 6 of 34
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    wizard69 said:
    staticx57 said:
    Educate yourself on modern OLED displays.
    Which have zero visibility in sun light.  I wouldn't be surprised to find Apple jumping right past OLED's to a new technology.   In any event I'm not convinced OLED's are that much better than LCD's.  
    Using my AW in sun light frequently... don't see that problem.
  • Reply 7 of 34
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    clemynx said:
    wizard69 said:
    Which have zero visibility in sun light.  I wouldn't be surprised to find Apple jumping right past OLED's to a new technology.   In any event I'm not convinced OLED's are that much better than LCD's.  
    Using my AW in sun light frequently... don't see that problem.
    The 'problem' is that Apple phones don't have OLED screens at the moment while Samsung phones obviously do, so OLED has to be considered to be an inferior technology right up to the minute Apple releases a phone with an OLED screen when suddenly it will become the best technology since sliced bread and the ass-covering will take the form: Apple's OLED panels are better than anyone elses and all those that existed in products before the iPhone can be discounted as grossly inferior. There will be claims that OLED panels have only become good enough because Apple has secretly been researching the OLED tech that is in the new panels, based on Apple marketing inventing and using some term like 'retina' in describing 'their' new displays.

    I have argued with people that claims of burn-in are grossly exaggerated and are limited to extreme cases, but no doubt any panels Apple uses will be touted as being somehow superior to all others and free of the non-issue because Apple has solved the 'problem' because of some marketing spiel.
    Think of all the BS arguments on AI for years about the inferiority of phones with screens larger than what were in iPhones - right up until iPhones got them. It's exactly like that nonsense.
    edited December 2015 bobroostaticx57dasanman69
  • Reply 8 of 34
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,251member
    cnocbui said:
    clemynx said:
    Using my AW in sun light frequently... don't see that problem.
    The 'problem' is that Apple phones don't have OLED screens at the moment while Samsung phones obviously do, so OLED has to be considered to be an inferior technology right up to the minute Apple releases a phone with an OLED screen when suddenly it will become the best technology since sliced bread and the ass-covering will take the form: Apple's OLED panels are better than anyone elses and all those that existed in products before the iPhone can be discounted as grossly inferior. There will be claims that OLED panels have only become good enough because Apple has secretly been researching the OLED tech that is in the new panels, based on Apple marketing inventing and using some term like 'retina' in describing 'their' new displays.

    I have argued with people that claims of burn-in are grossly exaggerated and are limited to extreme cases, but no doubt any panels Apple uses will be touted as being somehow superior to all others and free of the non-issue because Apple has solved the 'problem' because of some marketing spiel.
    Think of all the BS arguments on AI for years about the inferiority of phones with screens larger than what were in iPhones - right up until iPhones got them. It's exactly like that nonsense.
    You have it entirely backwards.  Apple only introduce technologies when they work the way Apple want them to, taking everything into consideration.  Samsung on the other hand will introduce a new technology just so they have bragging rights, even if there are huge downsides to using said technology that are not obvious at first.
    argonautronnredgeminipanetmagerattlhedflaneurdrunkzombienolamacguy
  • Reply 9 of 34
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:
    The 'problem' is that Apple phones don't have OLED screens at the moment while Samsung phones obviously do, so OLED has to be considered to be an inferior technology right up to the minute Apple releases a phone with an OLED screen when suddenly it will become the best technology since sliced bread and the ass-covering will take the form: Apple's OLED panels are better than anyone elses and all those that existed in products before the iPhone can be discounted as grossly inferior. There will be claims that OLED panels have only become good enough because Apple has secretly been researching the OLED tech that is in the new panels, based on Apple marketing inventing and using some term like 'retina' in describing 'their' new displays.

    I have argued with people that claims of burn-in are grossly exaggerated and are limited to extreme cases, but no doubt any panels Apple uses will be touted as being somehow superior to all others and free of the non-issue because Apple has solved the 'problem' because of some marketing spiel.
    Think of all the BS arguments on AI for years about the inferiority of phones with screens larger than what were in iPhones - right up until iPhones got them. It's exactly like that nonsense.
    You have it entirely backwards.  Apple only introduce technologies when they work the way Apple want them to, taking everything into consideration.  Samsung on the other hand will introduce a new technology just so they have bragging rights, even if there are huge downsides to using said technology that are not obvious at first.
    What was the technology that suddenly made a larger screen size meet Apple's requirements and where you can point out superiority over all preceding large screen phones?
    rogifan_olddasanman69
  • Reply 10 of 34
    cnocbui said:
    clemynx said:
    Using my AW in sun light frequently... don't see that problem.
    The 'problem' is that Apple phones don't have OLED screens at the moment while Samsung phones obviously do, so OLED has to be considered to be an inferior technology right up to the minute Apple releases a phone with an OLED screen when suddenly it will become the best technology since sliced bread and the ass-covering will take the form: Apple's OLED panels are better than anyone elses and all those that existed in products before the iPhone can be discounted as grossly inferior. There will be claims that OLED panels have only become good enough because Apple has secretly been researching the OLED tech that is in the new panels, based on Apple marketing inventing and using some term like 'retina' in describing 'their' new displays.

    I have argued with people that claims of burn-in are grossly exaggerated and are limited to extreme cases, but no doubt any panels Apple uses will be touted as being somehow superior to all others and free of the non-issue because Apple has solved the 'problem' because of some marketing spiel.
    Think of all the BS arguments on AI for years about the inferiority of phones with screens larger than what were in iPhones - right up until iPhones got them. It's exactly like that nonsense.
    Finally, someone who sees behind the curtain! I believe, if this article is taken as truth; the most important take-away is the driving down of LG and Samsung margins to 8 -9% indicated. In my opinion that would be the primary motivation for a move to OLED screens. 
    cnocbui
  • Reply 11 of 34
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,503member
    "Citing unnamed industry sources" If true than why unnamed. Thanks to Apple's very high quality demand that forced innovation in OLED, Now, looks like OLED have come long way to match strict standard of LCD in smartphones. If past and current OLED were that good than LG itself who is a major player in OLED panel productions would use it in it's own flagship smartphones instead currently using LCD. Even Samsung who started making OLED TVs has stopped or reduced making OLED TVs. Take away is OLED technology has matured with acceptable level of quality and production yield(price) offering alternative to LCD for Apple's mass consumption need.And don't forget about the secret panel lab that Apple acquired from Qualcomm who may be instrumental in driving such decision. Apple provides OLED technology to it's standard and LG/Samsung manufactures with their mass OLED producing know-how.
    edited December 2015
  • Reply 12 of 34
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,251member
    cnocbui said:
    You have it entirely backwards.  Apple only introduce technologies when they work the way Apple want them to, taking everything into consideration.  Samsung on the other hand will introduce a new technology just so they have bragging rights, even if there are huge downsides to using said technology that are not obvious at first.
    What was the technology that suddenly made a larger screen size meet Apple's requirements and where you can point out superiority over all preceding large screen phones?

    Well I tend to believe Tim Cook's comments.

     “Honestly …we could have done a larger iPhone years ago,” Cook said. “It’s never just about making a larger phone. It’s about making a better phone in every single way.”

    Cook went on to say that Apple wanted to make sure the display, battery, and software were ready for the bigger form factor before shipping. For example, Apple developed a one-handed mode for the bigger iPhones that pops the top portion of the screen down so the user can reach it with one hand.

    redgeminipanetmageSpamSandwich
  • Reply 13 of 34
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    wood1208 said:
    Thanks to Apple's very high quality demand that forced innovation in OLED,
    Steve Jobs' reality distortion field is alive and well.

    That is just too funny.
    dasanman69
  • Reply 14 of 34
    I hope not cause OLED's have zero visibility in sunlight. 
    wizard69 said:
    staticx57 said:
    Educate yourself on modern OLED displays.
    Which have zero visibility in sun light.  I wouldn't be surprised to find Apple jumping right past OLED's to a new technology.   In any event I'm not convinced OLED's are that much better than LCD's.  
    Next time you get a chance on a bright sunny day, head to your closest cell phone retailer and compare the various displays of newer flagship phones with OLED displays against the newer iPhones. 

    I think you both will be pleasantly surprised at how good the newer flagship OLED displays look in all conditions running the gamut from direct sunlight to total darkness.

    To say newer OLED displays have zero visibility in direct sunlight is simply not true in my honest opinion.
  • Reply 15 of 34
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    techlover said:
    I hope not cause OLED's have zero visibility in sunlight. 
    Next time you get a chance on a bright sunny day, head to your closest cell phone retailer and compare the various displays of newer flagship phones with OLED displays against the newer iPhones. 

    I think you both will be pleasantly surprised at how good the newer flagship OLED displays look in all conditions running the gamut from direct sunlight to total darkness.

    To say newer OLED displays have zero visibility in direct sunlight is simply not true in my honest opinion.
    They wouldn't be 'pleasantly surprised';  pissed-off would be closer to the truth.

    Calling Sog35:

    Apple has agreed to pay a sum of €318 million (around $350 million) to settle an Italian tax fraud case, according to a report from the country's daily newspaper La Repubblica.
    ; http://www.gsmarena.com/apple_agrees_to_pay_318_million_as_settlement_in_italian_tax_fraud_case-blog-15787.php

    Later this year we will likely see a retrospective claw-back of hundreds of millions by the Australian government and of Billions by the Irish government at the behest of the EU.



    edited December 2015
  • Reply 16 of 34
    thrangthrang Posts: 866member
    cnocbui said:
    clemynx said:
    Using my AW in sun light frequently... don't see that problem.
    The 'problem' is that Apple phones don't have OLED screens at the moment while Samsung phones obviously do, so OLED has to be considered to be an inferior technology right up to the minute Apple releases a phone with an OLED screen when suddenly it will become the best technology since sliced bread and the ass-covering will take the form: Apple's OLED panels are better than anyone elses and all those that existed in products before the iPhone can be discounted as grossly inferior. There will be claims that OLED panels have only become good enough because Apple has secretly been researching the OLED tech that is in the new panels, based on Apple marketing inventing and using some term like 'retina' in describing 'their' new displays.

    I have argued with people that claims of burn-in are grossly exaggerated and are limited to extreme cases, but no doubt any panels Apple uses will be touted as being somehow superior to all others and free of the non-issue because Apple has solved the 'problem' because of some marketing spiel.
    Think of all the BS arguments on AI for years about the inferiority of phones with screens larger than what were in iPhones - right up until iPhones got them. It's exactly like that nonsense.
    OLED has had years of issues - technical/yield/cost. It's why they're still relatively rare today. I'm fairly certain Apple waited for maturation and reduced risk levels, contributed engineering to the quality level it demands, and started with the Watch to see how it went. Knowing the history of OLED, I'm not sure how you can't see that as a pragmatic and realistic approach

    And then there is quantum dot...

    http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/02/quantum-dots-could-take-the-retina-display-to-the-next-level.html
    edited December 2015 flaneur
  • Reply 17 of 34
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:
    What was the technology that suddenly made a larger screen size meet Apple's requirements and where you can point out superiority over all preceding large screen phones?

    Well I tend to believe Tim Cook's comments.

     “Honestly …we could have done a larger iPhone years ago,” Cook said. “It’s never just about making a larger phone. It’s about making a better phone in every single way.”

    Cook went on to say that Apple wanted to make sure the display, battery, and software were ready for the bigger form factor before shipping. For example, Apple developed a one-handed mode for the bigger iPhones that pops the top portion of the screen down so the user can reach it with one hand.

    That one-handed mode must have taken them years to develop, given their noted lack of software prowess.  Samsung already had a on-handed usability feature.  Large screened phones were obviously very usable even without such a feature. Their practicality and popularity was not reliant on their being such a feature. Tim Cook's comment was disingenuous.
  • Reply 18 of 34
    OLED still (AFAIK) has a blue pixel issue that requires hoops to ensure consistent display over time and the jury rigging of two.bkue.oixels and self calibration isn't Apple's style. 

    I can believe they've worked out the issue and find OLED about ready for prime time, however. 
  • Reply 19 of 34
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    netmage said:
    OLED still (AFAIK) has a blue pixel issue that requires hoops to ensure consistent display over time and the jury rigging of two.bkue.oixels and self calibration isn't Apple's style. 

    I can believe they've worked out the issue and find OLED about ready for prime time, however. 
    I have a 5 year old OLED screened phone.  I have not noticed any issue with blue-fade or burn-in.  OLED TV panels are likely to see far more hours of use than any phone ever will - unless it's being used by someone with issues.
    edited December 2015
  • Reply 20 of 34
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,422member
    cnocbui said:
    clemynx said:
    Using my AW in sun light frequently... don't see that problem.
    The 'problem' is that Apple phones don't have OLED screens at the moment while Samsung phones obviously do, so OLED has to be considered to be an inferior technology right up to the minute Apple releases a phone with an OLED screen when suddenly it will become the best technology since sliced bread and the ass-covering will take the form

    Well you're certainly entitled to your take on any given issue, but Apple has usually held off adopting any kind of technology unit they feel it meets THEIR standard in some purposeful way. If it doesn't, then they skip it. There's no reason to adopt OLED if LCD can still perform at the same levels. I'd be willing to bet Apple passes up OLED in favor of their own displays; Apple acquired LuxVue a while ago, a company that specialized in micro-LED display technologies.

    As for this article... Seems as if someone is merely trying to "prop" up the Korean OLED market. What better way than to scream, "Apple!"
    edited December 2015
Sign In or Register to comment.