Wi-Fi Alliance vets 802.11ah 'HaLow' standard with almost double current range

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 45
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    mike1 said:
    I have to reboot my router (not my modem) every few days to a week to keep everything working properly. Not sure why. I've tried troubleshooting but every few days something loses connectivity. Sometimes its my ATV, sometimes its my Smart TV, somethimes its a phone or iPad. Sometimes it's one of the wireless printers. The wired outputs always work, but the wireless gets persnickety.

    You would not believe how busy the airwaves are getting, especially in concentrated areas, like inside of a home. If you're experiencing that much trouble keeping your devices connected, then likely something is interfering. You need to make some configuration changes, not just blame the tech.

    Definitely make sure you have a decent router. Not every router is up to the job. Don't cheap out on this item. Apple routers are excellent, but any router in the $100+ range should likely do a great job.

    Change radio channels on your router. if all of your neighbours are using Channel 11, then there's going to be trouble. Choose a radically different channel and see if things improve.

    Turn off any wireless tech that you are not actively using. For example, if you never use Bluetooth from your computer(s), turn it off until you need it.
    Theoretically the router should be able to work this out, they are configured to auto in most cases. Also measuring the local wifi strengths and overlapping takes software definitely not available on iOS and probably not on a mac. (Not afaik). 
  • Reply 22 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    ireland said:
    Sadly I don't think my ISP allows you to swap them out. The router isn't the problem, it's the modem.
    You have a router/modem combo, and you know it's the modem part of the HW that deals with your connection to your ISP, not with your local network? If that was the case, then you Apple TV wouldn't be knocked off your Wireless LAN. Your LAN would still be intact and your connection to the internet, either wireless or cabled, would be affected.
  • Reply 23 of 45
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    ireland said:
    Buy a proper wireless router. The ones provided by the cable/telco companies are absolute garage. 
    Sadly I don't think my ISP allows you to swap them out. The router isn't the problem, it's the modem.
    You don't have to swap it, you'll be supplementing it. I'm sure your cable modem has ethernet ports. You plug a wireless router into one and then run your wireless network off the new router instead of the cable modem. 
  • Reply 24 of 45
    jackansijackansi Posts: 116member
    hexclock said:
    How is the 900 MHz band unlicensed? Cordless phones have been operating at that frequency for years. 
    The extended range would be welcome at my place. 
    Not 100% accurate description of all "unlicensed" operation, but a great place to start supplementing your knowledge around this area:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISM_band
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 25 of 45
    softekysofteky Posts: 135member
    ireland said:
    Sadly I don't think my ISP allows you to swap them out. The router isn't the problem, it's the modem.
    You don't have to swap it, you'll be supplementing it. I'm sure your cable modem has ethernet ports. You plug a wireless router into one and then run your wireless network off the new router instead of the cable modem. 
    What I've found works best is to switch ISP's modem/router combination to bridge mode, wire the output LAN line from the combo to the WAN port of an Apple AirPort Extreme (latest tower version). Get the version with built in disk (Time Capsule) if you can afford it and have your backups taken care of too. If anything breaks it is then squarely an ISP issue. If you're trying to run Apple TVs off slow DSL though, all bets are off so make sure your ISP is selling you a bandwidth that matches your needs. Turn off the ISP router's wireless and handle all wireless from the AirPort Extreme. 

    If the ISPs router is a separate unit from their modem, put their router in a drawer and wire the extreme WAN directly to the modem's Ethernet (first time you do this, you'll likely need to power cycle the modem so it will talk to (MAC authenticate) the new router). 

    For more fun, buy the smallest disk Time Capsule and manually swap out the disk for a 4TB version (4TB works, I've not personally tried any higher capacity drives). 
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 26 of 45
    irelandireland Posts: 17,785member
    ireland said:
    Sadly I don't think my ISP allows you to swap them out. The router isn't the problem, it's the modem.
    You don't have to swap it, you'll be supplementing it. I'm sure your cable modem has ethernet ports. You plug a wireless router into one and then run your wireless network off the new router instead of the cable modem. 
    Once again, the issue is not the router, it's the modem. 
  • Reply 27 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    ireland said:
    Once again, the issue is not the router, it's the modem. 
    Based on everything you've stated that doesn't seem to be the case, and I now have doubts you know the difference between a modem, bridge, switch, or router.
  • Reply 28 of 45
    irelandireland Posts: 17,785member
    Soli said:
    ireland said:
    Sadly I don't think my ISP allows you to swap them out. The router isn't the problem, it's the modem.
    You have a router/modem combo, and you know it's the modem part of the HW that deals with your connection to your ISP, not with your local network? If that was the case, then you Apple TV wouldn't be knocked off your Wireless LAN. Your LAN would still be intact and your connection to the internet, either wireless or cabled, would be affected.
    You are wrong. I know it's the modem. My network is an AirPort Extreme which is fine. I've months of experience dealing with this issue, Apple and my ISP. The nature of how a media server works, in this case my Apple TV, is causing my modem to overheat and it boots what it deems is the culprit off the network when this happens. Turning the modem up on it's side allowing it to run cooler overall keeps the Apple TV on the network for longer, but eventually they get booted. I know what the issue is. I'm buying a fan now to keep it on the network for longer.
  • Reply 29 of 45
    irelandireland Posts: 17,785member
    Soli said:
    ireland said:
    I'm blaming my dumb cable modem.
    It's very unlikely your cable modem causing the issue.
    Thankfully having lived with this issue for months and by trial and error we've figured out it is in fact the modem and not the router that's causing the issue I need to waste time trying to figure out what's causing this issue.

    I own an AEBS, like I say, the issue is the modem.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 30 of 45
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Bluetooth > Wifi
    Although having these work together is the key. I personally believe, that all home kit devices should come equipped with both wifi and Bluetooth and not only communicate with the hub, but act as boosters. 

    Example: I'm listening to music off my iPhone that is charging downstairs with Bluetooth headphones, and I go outside of Bluetooth range. The hub could determine the closest hub connected device (be it an upstairs Apple TV, hue lights, or maybe even a dedicated booster the size of an iPad charger plugged into an outlet) send the music via wifi, then that device send it to the my headset via Bluetooth.
    Bluetooth is like Linux: "next year it'll be better". Never happens. 
    LOL!
  • Reply 31 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    ireland said:
    I have to restart my dumb cable modem twice daily now to get my Apple TVs back on the network.
    ireland said:
    Thankfully having lived with this issue for months and by trial and error we've figured out it is in fact the modem and not the router that's causing the issue I need to waste time trying to figure out what's causing this issue.

    I own an AEBS, like I say, the issue is the modem.
    So your cable modem overheats, which someone sends a signal to your AEBS which then sends either a wireless or wired signal to your Apple TV which knocks it, and only it off your LAN. Again—and more directly this time—that sounds ridiculous.
  • Reply 32 of 45
    bugsnwbugsnw Posts: 717member
    ireland said:
    I have to restart my dumb cable modem twice daily now to get my Apple TVs back on the network. I believe it overheats and boots the culprits off its network. Some pain in the ass.
    This is the voodoo of wi-fi. I switched to Comcast and now my Apple TV reboots about 2 minutes into a movie. Resets improve things for a little while. Someone said to reset the routers and I've found that to be helpful for a time. Just imagine the utopia of one robust, reliable standard that is fast and penetrates through steel. I want to live in that world. Right now, it's just plain old reset/cut power, reconnect/pray.
  • Reply 33 of 45
    I'm usually not a cranky get off my lawn old person about technology (I'm only 28), but my only thought when reading this was, "Great, now even more neighbors can clog up my local bandwidth from even further away."  I can already see 10-15 Wifi networks at a time in my house, and I live on a street corner, so there is only one house directly adjacent to mine.
  • Reply 34 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    creek0512 said:
    I'm usually not a cranky get off my lawn old person about technology (I'm only 28), but my only thought when reading this was, "Great, now even more neighbors can clog up my local bandwidth from even further away."  I can already see 10-15 Wifi networks at a time in my house, and I live on a street corner, so there is only one house directly adjacent to mine.
    Have your next house built from scratch with a Faraday cage built into it. You can flip a wall-switch on a directional WiFi router if you ever want to use your WiFi in your yard.
  • Reply 35 of 45
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    802.11ah "HaLow"

    “Ah, halow! Howwar youw? I’wm fiwne. Juss a beestiwng on mwy wip.”
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 36 of 45
    digitoldigitol Posts: 269member
    Meanwhile, some 1.5 + years and counting APPLE HAS YET TO UPDATE AIRPORT EXPRESS...still 802.11 !!!!!!
  • Reply 37 of 45
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Soli said:
    ireland said:
    I have to restart my dumb cable modem twice daily now to get my Apple TVs back on the network.
    So your cable modem overheats, which someone sends a signal to8 your AEBS which then sends either a wireless or wired signal to your Apple TV which knocks it, and only it off your LAN. Again—and more directly this time—that sounds ridiculous.
    I too thought it was ridiculous until I searched it, and sure enough it seems to be a common occurrence. His modem must have a defect, and it's probably a design flaw. 

    My son, and I game online with 2 different consoles at the same time and we've never gotten booted. A solitary ATV shouldn't be able to tax a modem to the point that it needs to be shut down, but that does seem to be the case. 
  • Reply 38 of 45
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    ireland said:
    Soli said:
    It's very unlikely your cable modem causing the issue.
    Thankfully having lived with this issue for months and by trial and error we've figured out it is in fact the modem and not the router that's causing the issue I need to waste time trying to figure out what's causing this issue.

    I own an AEBS, like I say, the issue is the modem.
    Are you absolutely sure you can't use a 3rd party cable modem? 
  • Reply 39 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,033member
    I too thought it was ridiculous until I searched it, and sure enough it seems to be a common occurrence. His modem must have a defect, and it's probably a design flaw. 

    My son, and I game online with 2 different consoles at the same time and we've never gotten booted. A solitary ATV shouldn't be able to tax a modem to the point that it needs to be shut down, but that does seem to be the case. 
    Then his modem should be replaced, and if that's impossible, like he states, then I'd try using a bridge/switch between the modem and AEBS to split the data-link layers. A simple bridge or switch may not be as taxed as a device that is programed to deal with layer 2 switching, layer 3 Ethernet and WiFI.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 40 of 45
    ksecksec Posts: 1,568member
    digitol said:
    Meanwhile, some 1.5 + years and counting APPLE HAS YET TO UPDATE AIRPORT EXPRESS...still 802.11 !!!!!!
    You mean 802.11N.

    I am reading a little more into this, I dont see how this will complete with something like Bluetooth 4.2 ( LP ) in terms of low power usage.

     
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