Hunter debuts first HomeKit-connected ceiling fans

Posted:
in General Discussion
Adding to the blitz of CES announcements building on the success of Apple's product ecosystem, Hunter Fan Company on Monday revealed two Wi-Fi enabled ceiling fans with smartphone connectivity support, including Apple's internet of things HomeKit protocol.




Hunter plans to introduce two fan models next month in the Symphony and Signal, both of which feature Wi-Fi technology and HomeKit support for smart home automation and voice control via Apple's Siri virtual assistant.

Alongside app-based remote control capabilities, the connected fans can be triggered using HomeKit's geolocation functions or included as part of a larger scene macro. Users can, for example, set a geolocation trigger to turn off fan lights, draw the blinds and lock the doors when they leave the house.

In addition, the fans integrate with existing smart home products like connected thermostats and other HomeKit-capable devices to deliver comprehensive automation features. For example, the fan's dimmable LED light might be triggered to illuminate when a HomeKit smoke detector goes off.

"When we first had cameras on our iPhones, we didn't immediately envision the ability to deposit checks with them. Similarly, we know that these fans enhance energy efficiency, home security and convenience, but we believe we've just scratched the surface of their full potential," said John Neilson, Hunter's chief marketing officer.

Symphony and Signal are both 54-inch fans, feature advanced motors, built-in lighting and are expected to go on sale in February for $329 and $379, respectively.
gonevw

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,390member

    "When we first had cameras on our iPhones, we didn't immediately envision the ability to deposit checks with them. Similarly, we know that these fans enhance energy efficiency, home security and convenience, but we believe we've just scratched the surface of their full potential," said John Neilson, Hunter's chief marketing officer.
    I like the way they're thinking. Maybe I should have applied for that design job there a few months back. Oh well.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    As someone in the market for a ceiling fan lately my biggest question is why they are all so hideously ugly.  These are no exception.  

    Why, if I want a ceiling fan, do all the manufacturers assume I'm some hick from Arkansas with a mostly fake wood grain decor that's only alleviated by hints of cheap crappy brass?  Even that white one is pretty silly looking.  Where are all the elegant, attractive ceiling fans?  Or do they exist at all?  

    I really don't see any real world advantage (beyond the novelty) of controlling it with my iPhone either.  
    mike1cornchip
  • Reply 3 of 7
    gonevwgonevw Posts: 45member
    Big Ass Fans are the only ones, I'm glad I didn't buy their 1000 fan
  • Reply 4 of 7
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,923member
    "Users can, for example, set a geolocation trigger to turn off fan lights, draw the blinds and lock the doors when they leave the house."

    I love how all the examples cited by these suppliers assumes everybody lives alone. I can see it now...

    Sorry, honey, I left for work a 1/2-hour before you, but when I left, I automatically lowered the heat, shut off all the lights and set the alarm. That's why the police showed up at 7:30 in the morning while you were in the shower.
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 5 of 7
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
     any real world advantage (beyond the novelty) of controlling it with my iPhone either.  
    Smart Appliance > HomeKit > Siri > Hey Siri.

    It is still in the stages of "just getting there", but with always-on Hey Siri, the possibilities of being able to walk into a room and say "Hey Siri, Living Room Lights On" and it just happens, is where this is all going. 

    Fiddling with your iPhone to get to the App that has the controls is never going to feel a lot more convenient than just flipping a switch....but completely handsfree voice control over smart appliances...it doesnt get much better than that.
    mac fan
  • Reply 6 of 7
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    As someone in the market for a ceiling fan lately my biggest question is why they are all so hideously ugly.  These are no exception.  

    Why, if I want a ceiling fan, do all the manufacturers assume I'm some hick from Arkansas with a mostly fake wood grain decor that's only alleviated by hints of cheap crappy brass?  Even that white one is pretty silly looking.  Where are all the elegant, attractive ceiling fans?  Or do they exist at all?  

    I really don't see any real world advantage (beyond the novelty) of controlling it with my iPhone either.  
    i agree that theyre ugly. a lot of modern design is, in designer attempts to distance themselves from past designs that actually withstood the test of time. too bad, because the classic Hunter fans i have (which are decades old) are attractive and built like tanks.

    but disagree that this is a novelty. my home relies on ceiling fans, and i can't count the number of times while laying in bed that i wish i could adjust the fan based on comfort without having to climb out of bed in the middle of the night and walk over to the wall switch. no brainer. 
    edited January 2016
  • Reply 7 of 7
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 939member
    As someone in the market for a ceiling fan lately my biggest question is why they are all so hideously ugly.  These are no exception.  

    Why, if I want a ceiling fan, do all the manufacturers assume I'm some hick from Arkansas with a mostly fake wood grain decor that's only alleviated by hints of cheap crappy brass?  Even that white one is pretty silly looking.  Where are all the elegant, attractive ceiling fans?  Or do they exist at all?  

    I really don't see any real world advantage (beyond the novelty) of controlling it with my iPhone either.  
    Here's a Real World Advantage® (though not exclusive to iPhone):

    If you are doing an installation in a room that has never had overhead lighting and the associated switch run in the walls & ceiling, a remote switching capability is super convenient from a labor (money) saving perspective. In my home, the builder wired switching outlets in all the bedrooms rather than install overhead lighting. I'm thinking of retrofitting overhead fans to economize on AC in the summertime and dropping ceiling boxes and nothing else is a much easier & cheaper solution than ceiling boxes and running in-wall switch wiring to control the fans.

    Of course a simple battery-powered remote switch could do the same thing, but as long as the manufacturer is going to install a radio control, why not make it a HomeKit-compatible radio?
    mac fan
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