Dutch National Police working to train anti-drone eagles

Posted:
in General Discussion
As remotely-controlled drones become smaller and more sophisticated, authorities are working to counter the potential security and privacy implications in sometimes novel ways -- including training eagles to take the aircraft down.




The Dutch National Police have begun working with a private firm that specializes in "training birds of prey to intercept hostile drones." Thus far that seems to mean using eagles to snatch wayward drones out of the air, as noted by IEEE Spectrum.

The company -- known as Guard From Above and based in The Hague -- says that birds of prey are uniquely suited to the task thanks to their ability to catch up with and overpower fast-moving animals.



Both Guard From Above and the Dutch National Police have sought to allay fears that drones may harm the birds by asking the Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research to conduct scientific studies into the issue. Even in the absence of verifiable evidence, however, Guard From Above says that injury is unlikely.

"In nature, birds of prey often overpower large and dangerous prey," the company wrote in a press release. "Their talons have scales, which protect them, naturally, from their victims' bites."

In addition to methods of taking down rogue drones, most developed nations are exploring new regulatory frameworks for drone use by both individuals and businesses. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has indicated that it will require certain classes of drones to be registered, hoping to "help build a culture of accountability and responsibility."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    This is awesome! I saw it on TV last night. lol. Not only do they snatch up your kid's toys, but they can tell if your sandwich has too many calories...then swoooosh...healthy living. 
  • Reply 2 of 24
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,615member
    Raptor takes down drone. Survival of the fittest.
  • Reply 3 of 24
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,615member
    And if the drone has an IED attached the eagle could be trained to just drop it on the head of the guy with the controller.
  • Reply 4 of 24
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,767member
    You idiot humans. Drone may seem fun to fly but please leave these magnificence bird from your pathetic experiment. Either develop shoulder mounted laser or other gun to take drones down. OR why don't you either put law to not fly drone because it could have public safety like bringing passenger plane down or attach small bomb and target to crash into some high rise office to kill intended and innocent and no one knows who did it. or take video of someone's bedroom scene and than post on youtube to damage/destroy someone's private life.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 5 of 24
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    AppleInsider said:

    The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has indicated that it will require certain classes of drones to be registered, hoping to "help build a culture of accountability and responsibility."

    Any bad guys who wanted to take out the eagle certainly should be able to. Plus, this technique would probably only work with small plastic drones. An eagle would be no match for a heavy duty professional drone.

    Next the feds will probably require a software back door from drone manufacturers to make it possible for them to disable a drone and land it safely. 
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 6 of 24
    dws-2dws-2 Posts: 220member
    Perfect solution, but you need to add lasers.
  • Reply 7 of 24
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    bald eagles? you mean AMERICAN FREEDOM BIRDS! 
    pscooter63
  • Reply 8 of 24
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,976member
    bald eagles? you mean AMERICAN FREEDOM BIRDS! 
    No, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_birds_of_the_Netherlands there aren't bald eagles in The Netherlands. You could tell by the photo/movie that these eagles are either juvenile (takes 4 years for a bald eagle to get white feathers) or a different species.
  • Reply 9 of 24
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,111member
    rob53 said:
    bald eagles? you mean AMERICAN FREEDOM BIRDS! 
    No, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_birds_of_the_Netherlands there aren't bald eagles in The Netherlands. You could tell by the photo/movie that these eagles are either juvenile (takes 4 years for a bald eagle to get white feathers) or a different species.
    They are bald eagles. In the video, you can clearly see one is an adult and the other is a juvenile. 
    nolamacguy
  • Reply 10 of 24
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,338member
    This seems dangerous to the birds. If they can grab the drone at the right spot, then ok. But if they grab it, and it moves so that the props hit the bird, particularly on the leg or feet, then that bird is going to get injured.
    cnocbuipscooter63
  • Reply 11 of 24
    Which will lead to defensive anti-eagle countermeasures, like shooting live mice toward the eagle.
    rbonnerpscooter63
  • Reply 12 of 24
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,976member

    volcan said:
    AppleInsider said:

    The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has indicated that it will require certain classes of drones to be registered, hoping to "help build a culture of accountability and responsibility."

    Any bad guys who wanted to take out the eagle certainly should be able to. Plus, this technique would probably only work with small plastic drones. An eagle would be no match for a heavy duty professional drone.

    Next the feds will probably require a software back door from drone manufacturers to make it possible for them to disable a drone and land it safely. 
    It depends on how large the professional drone is. I know bald eagles in the Pacific Northwest have no problems snatching small dogs, cats and other animals weighing 4-5 lbs while their main diet is spawning salmon during those seasons. We're not talking about grabbing small trout but large salmon. I could see a bald eagle damaging a drone in the 12-18" diameter size just by grabbing it with its tremendously strong talons. Of course, in the PNW, I can't wait to hear about the first drone taken down by a shotgun, especially one from Amazon.
  • Reply 13 of 24
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,763member
    rob53 said:

    It depends on how large the professional drone is. I know bald eagles in the Pacific Northwest have no problems snatching small dogs, cats and other animals weighing 4-5 lbs while their main diet is spawning salmon during those seasons. 
    Eagles have been seen attacking animals as large as a deer so it is not so much the weight. I was thinking that the large professional drones, some with 6 metal rotors spinning at high velocity, could easily injure the bird. I don't like drones but this just seems like it has the potential for animal cruelty, at least to me. 
  • Reply 14 of 24
    19831983 Posts: 1,142member
    "In nature, birds of prey often overpower large and dangerous prey," the company wrote in a press release. "Their talons have scales, which protect them, naturally, from their victims' bites."

     But then prey aren't manmade drones that could be armed in some way to scare off, hurt or even take down that bird of prey, if attacked.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 15 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    melgross said:
    This seems dangerous to the birds. If they can grab the drone at the right spot, then ok. But if they grab it, and it moves so that the props hit the bird, particularly on the leg or feet, then that bird is going to get injured.
    Maybe they will provide the bird with armoured gaiters, but I had the same thought. There isn't much padding on a birds leg and the blades could do some damage.
  • Reply 16 of 24
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,369member
    volcan said:
    Any bad guys who wanted to take out the eagle certainly should be able to. 
    And if the good guys with a raptor can take out bad drones, then a bad guy with a raptor can take out the good guy's drones. Then all drones will have raptor escorts. And then maybe the raptors will engage each other. Nothing can go wrong with this ...
    pscooter63
  • Reply 17 of 24
    rbonnerrbonner Posts: 635member
    Which will lead to defensive anti-eagle countermeasures, like shooting live mice toward the eagle.
    Made my day, thank you. Why are people so concerned about drones? Guy up the street is super concerned about them being over his home, thinking I should chum up to him if he is throwing such great outdoor parties! Really asking, why do we care so much about this? If they are this much of a issue, maybe just ban the sale?
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 18 of 24
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,976member
    rob53 said:
    No, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_birds_of_the_Netherlands there aren't bald eagles in The Netherlands. You could tell by the photo/movie that these eagles are either juvenile (takes 4 years for a bald eagle to get white feathers) or a different species.
    They are bald eagles. In the video, you can clearly see one is an adult and the other is a juvenile. 
    My mistake, I didn't watch the video until now. The only eagle they show attacking the drone might be a juvenile bald eagle. I would have like to have seen the adult bald eagle attack it but they simply held that eagle.
  • Reply 19 of 24
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,976member

    rbonner said:
    Which will lead to defensive anti-eagle countermeasures, like shooting live mice toward the eagle.
    Made my day, thank you. Why are people so concerned about drones? Guy up the street is super concerned about them being over his home, thinking I should chum up to him if he is throwing such great outdoor parties! Really asking, why do we care so much about this? If they are this much of a issue, maybe just ban the sale?
    I think most people see these as an invasion of their privacy as well as being another source of noise. I get tired of the military jets strafing our neighborhood as they perform their training exercises up to midnight. I'd much rather hear birds and laughter from kids than a stupid drone. Drones have their place in certain areas for certain situations but not everywhere.
  • Reply 20 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Cool article. Is it apple related though? Trying to figure out its connection with Appleinsider...
    AI likes drones.
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