Obama administration, FBI must act to restore US government's credibility in Apple's encryption deb

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  • Reply 41 of 126
    Why would Apple give the keys to the kingdom to anyone; assuming they even have them?  It's a First Amendment issue.  It matters not who is running FBI or is President of the USA!  

    If the NSA can't break the code then they need to get better people on the job: OR, kudos to Apple's coders!  
    mwhitewetlanderjony0
  • Reply 42 of 126
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,428member
    I have a theory that a majority of the 1 posters are Fandroids who are merely upset that iPhones are so secure, and they wish for iPhones to be made less secure, because we all know that Androids are a joke, and Fandroids are merely jealous. What do Fandroids have to protect anyway? The average net worth of a Fandroid is probably less than $13.75
    jfc1138anantksundarampscooter63jony0
  • Reply 43 of 126
    The Gestapo is alive and well in DC.  These folks obviously can't read the 1st or 4th amendment to US Constitution ratified in 1789, so they are trying to sway public opinion with threats, and promises to protect us from terrorists. But most know and understand, the real threat is for our own completely out of control Federal, state, and local Gestapo.
    mwhitewetlandermatrix077jony0
  • Reply 44 of 126
    torusoft said:
    Of all the organizations one could choose to fight a public relations war with, Apple would be my last choice. If Comey keeps on this track, I think that between the botched investigation, disingenuousness, a base emotional appeal, and an unprecedented use of the All Writs Act, he'll end up resigning amid scandal. If the United States government can compel private companies and private citizens to do work on their behalf, it is truly breaking down the rights and freedoms it swears to upload and protect. Ordering Apple to break its own encryption is like ordering a safe maker to break into their own safe. Ordering privative companies and private citizens to work on the government's behalf is a hallmark of fascism. Just ask Mercedes Benz or Bavarian Motor Works. We hope people understand just how important this issue is and how it is.
    There's one way we know of to compel private citizens to do work on the government's behalf: the draft.
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 44 of 126
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,449member

    vbmalone said:

    I always feel the people that are so concerned about the government seeing our personal data must have something to hide.  When are people going to realize that using any type of electronic device or the internet to document your lives and personal data are no longer a secret.  If you don't want anyone to see it don't put it on your phone, computer or the cloud.  Use a good old fashion notebook that would need a search warrant.

    I have a lot to hide from criminals, not to mention I don't want the government to have access to my personal opinions. If you find the Internet to be like browsing through an echo chamber because of tracking, then you'll love what the government tells you in the future if it gains fluid access to your opinions.
    ai46steveh
  • Reply 46 of 126
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,449member
    Omaha said:
    Why would Apple give the keys to the kingdom to anyone;
    There you are, already assuming Trump will be our king.
    No way, Jose.
    ai46
  • Reply 47 of 126
    Jesus tap dancing christ, these first time posters must be sharing a box of lead paint chips.  Or employed by the same person.  
    jfc1138anantksundaramai46pscooter63mattinozjony0
  • Reply 48 of 126
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    vbmalone said:

    I always feel the people that are so concerned about the government seeing our personal data must have something to hide.  When are people going to realize that using any type of electronic device or the internet to document your lives and personal data are no longer a secret.  If you don't want anyone to see it don't put it on your phone, computer or the cloud.  Use a good old fashion notebook that would need a search warrant.

    It's not "hiding" from the government, it's "hiding" from the criminals who, once in possession of a person's smartphone, has potential access to their bank accounts, brokerage accounts, credit card accounts, store accounts, ALL the contacts with addresses, etc.
    ai46ewtheckman
  • Reply 49 of 126
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,449member
    torusoft said:
    There's one way we know of to compel private citizens to do work on the government's behalf: the draft.
    Good luck drafting the source code to iOS.
    ai46
  • Reply 50 of 126
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,545member
    Microsoft is going with an Amicus Brief in support of Apple; Versizon is on board as well. It's started...

    Today's looking to be pretty good.
    ai46
  • Reply 51 of 126
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member

    Apple has the social responsibility to cooperate with the government on the safety of its citizenry. Surely they have the expertise to unlock one phone without creating a backdoor software, which can then be destroyed after its specific use for one phone. If one more death occurs from this one unlocked phone, Apple would have blood on their hands.

    The have the legal right to contest a court ruling based on a two hundred year old blank check act that's all of TWO sentences just like everybody else. Judges are not kings with unquestioned power: that's why we have appeals courts and, ultimately the supreme court. The rule of LAW, not individual judges.

    The COURT directed the delivery of  backdoor software set to the FBI, on the request OF the FBI (unlike judge Ornstein in the Brooklyn case Pym did NOT request Apple input before issuing her ruling). So what Apple may or not be capable of in your non-technical knowledge guess doesn't apply: the FBI demanded a backdoor.

    And please, this is a work phone they didn't bother to destroy when they crushed their own phones and EVERYTHING that phone was used for was recorded by the service provider and turned over to the FBI. "blood" my ass.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/28/1651

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Writs_Act
    edited February 2016 hlee1169ai46ewtheckmanjony0
  • Reply 52 of 126
    mj webmj web Posts: 918member
    Just what Apple needs now, a photoshopped of Steve Jobs of Steve Jobs giving the FBI the finger. How classy, how adult; DDE & AI! Even though I agree with the gist of the editorial, I'm applied by the immature prank photo.  
  • Reply 53 of 126
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,782member
    Riversong said:
    Why would anyone expect an "Apple insider" to say anything different.

    As a lifelong opponent of government overreach, I've been following this debate and found Apple's statements to be disingenuous and self-serving, NOT those of the FBI.

    I see the FBI is sending out ringers to argue their case. Why else the sudden influx of single posters?
    ai46ewtheckman
  • Reply 54 of 126
    FACT: "The FBI this month asked Congress for $69 million to "counter the threat of "Going Dark"– being unable to access data because of encryption and other techniques.The bureau currently devotes 39 people and $31 million to this effort."" – SOURCE: WSJ. Remember, FBI Director James Comey is essentially a bureaucrat. When all the dust has settled, it will be revealed this grandstanding act was because Comey is slated this month to more than double his budget but needed a good reason to give to Congress. This public embarrassment is to get more money for his budget out of Congress.
    edited February 2016 ai46jony0since84
  • Reply 55 of 126
    tenlytenly Posts: 707member
    Although annoying, I think all the new posters reflects that this article has been picked up and spread across many other websites.  DED deserves a bonus for this article.  It's eloquent (as usual), on target and although it's far from "clickbait" - it has obviously brought in many new "clicks" for AI.

    For every new moron that posts their disagreement here, I have to assume that there are 50 new intelligent people that silently agree with and support the issues that Daniel brings to light.  They don't create an account and post anything because they have nothing new to add to the discussion.

    Kudos Daniel!
    edited February 2016 hlee1169ai46pscooter63icoco3jony0
  • Reply 56 of 126
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,678member
    tmay said:
    vbmalone said:

    I always feel the people that are so concerned about the government seeing our personal data must have something to hide.  When are people going to realize that using any type of electronic device or the internet to document your lives and personal data are no longer a secret.  If you don't want anyone to see it don't put it on your phone, computer or the cloud.  Use a good old fashion notebook that would need a search warrant.

    Oh so you don't think that I should hide my Credit, Financial, Health information, family, friend and business contacts, prescriptions, family photos... 

    People like you are really tiresome, and your argument is bullshit. But you already knew that didn't you?
     HIPPA was created to protect health care terrorists, don't cha' know? My bank doesn't even use a PIN for their ATM card. They allow you to take out money on the honor system¡
  • Reply 57 of 126
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,449member
    apple ][ said:
    cpsro said:

    I assume that not all of those 175 suspects are dead, so they should use other methods to gain access, without compromising my security and the security of all other Apple users. Let them waterboard the suspects, I don't care. Just do not mess with my security.
    The Fifth Amendment might help them. Be careful what you wish for... you might be the next to be waterboarded.
  • Reply 58 of 126
    mwhitemwhite Posts: 184member
    sog35 said:
    I will explain the issue this way.

    Imagine if it was possible to build a machine that had the ability to read a person's mind. The machine could read a person's mind remotely, from anywhere in the United States. Do you think it would be a good idea to build such a machine?

    Lets say an accused murderer refuses to testify. And the police destroyed the only evidence that could convict him. Would building a mind reading machine be justified to find out the truth?  Would building a machine of freighting power be justified to solve a single murder case? What if this machine or the plans to build such a machine leaked out?  Even if the machine was destroyed after the trial the knowledge of how to build it would remain. I'm pretty sure that most rational people would agree that such a machine should never be built.

    The FBI and US government is asking Apple to build a similiarily dangerous and powerful machine. The ability to hack into any iPhone in the United States is dangerous. And like the mind reading machine its not a matter of if a bad guy gets his hands on it.  Its only a matter of time.  
    I agree.
    jony0since84
  • Reply 59 of 126
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,678member
    1) It's amazing how quickly some people forget about Bush, Cheney, and the Patriot Act.

    2) The facile argument of only allowing a backdoor into terrorist iPhones as if terrorists buy iPhones with a different version of iOS is so ridiculous I can't help but laugh.
  • Reply 60 of 126
    I have a good source... most of the 1 posters are from a government dark hole.
    Ask Appleinsider about the hack attempts they've had in the last few days.
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