Comey: 'Of course' FBI would leverage precedent in San Bernardino case

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 56
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 677member
    I desperately hope there's an investigation into this idiot. How does someone become head of the FBI, via Cornflakes packet??
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 42 of 56
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,994member
    I am listening to this hearing (and I urge you all to do the same, www.span.org). Regardless of their political affiliation, I have to say that I am blown away by the clarity, the thoughtfulness, the sincerity, and the depth of the questions that are being raised by our elected representatives.

    I do not believe that I am about to say this about the US Congress, but I am truly in awe and respect.

    Mr. Comey is completely out of his depth, and he's making the FBI look like a bunch of lazy, uninformed fools. He's a clueless bureaucrat not worthy of serving this country.
    There actually were a small number of representatives who posed thoughtful, informed questions. Then there were the thick-skulled others who asked the same question over and over, never comprehending the answers.
  • Reply 43 of 56
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,071member
    The court in N.Y. was smart enough to see that using the All Writs Act was a pile of crap and really weak and threw out that FBI case to unlock a iPhone in a Criminal investigation. That will be the end result in this case in another court room.
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 44 of 56
    Comey did not even read the order from Judge Orenstein. This fool went into this hearing unprepared, assuming the punching bag position. I think he needs a long vacation. It does not look like he is getting any sleep. Encryption nightmares?

    Darrell Issa would make a great Director of the FBI
    edited March 2016 stompy
  • Reply 45 of 56
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,104member
    I am listening to this hearing (and I urge you all to do the same, www.span.org). Regardless of their political affiliation, I have to say that I am blown away by the clarity, the thoughtfulness, the sincerity, and the depth of the questions that are being raised by our elected representatives.

    I do not believe that I am about to say this about the US Congress, but I am truly in awe and respect.

    Mr. Comey is completely out of his depth, and he's making the FBI look like a bunch of lazy, uninformed fools. He's a clueless bureaucrat not worthy of serving this country.
    There actually were a small number of representatives who posed thoughtful, informed questions. Then there were the thick-skulled others who asked the same question over and over, never comprehending the answers.
    Probably true. I only watched the first 55 minutes, then life intervened.....

    But that's 55 minutes more of awe and respect for the US Congress than I've had in.... forever.
    icoco3
  • Reply 46 of 56
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    There actually were a small number of representatives who posed thoughtful, informed questions. Then there were the thick-skulled others who asked the same question over and over, never comprehending the answers.
    Probably true. I only watched the first 55 minutes, then life intervened.....

    But that's 55 minutes more of awe and respect for the US Congress than I've had in.... forever.
    Watching the 11h Clinton hearings on Bengazi would quickly put your feelings in the right place ;-).

    Yes, it's an accident waiting to happen when you elect enough people... Some won't be total morons :-), some will truly want to serve their constituents and the american people.. Ah, if that was an universal truth!
    muppetry
  • Reply 47 of 56
    revenantrevenant Posts: 491member
    you know, there are other countries where backdoors are mandatory and the gov't snoops into people's digital lives. USA--NK, China and a few others are welcoming you to the club.

    it may be home of the brave, but it is not the land of the free.
  • Reply 48 of 56
    Urei1620Urei1620 Posts: 88member
    I am sure that China,  Russia and North Korra are rooting for Jim Comey. 
    edited March 2016
  • Reply 49 of 56
    There actually were a small number of representatives who posed thoughtful, informed questions. Then there were the thick-skulled others who asked the same question over and over, never comprehending the answers.
    Probably true. I only watched the first 55 minutes, then life intervened.....

    But that's 55 minutes more of awe and respect for the US Congress than I've had in.... forever.

    Did anyone ask him about the password reset botch-up?
  • Reply 50 of 56
    Probably true. I only watched the first 55 minutes, then life intervened.....

    But that's 55 minutes more of awe and respect for the US Congress than I've had in.... forever.

    Did anyone ask him about the password reset botch-up?

    A couple times. It was fortunately pretty clearly expressed by the representatives, and Sewell was allowed to affirm the FBI screw up.
    bestkeptsecret
  • Reply 51 of 56
    fallenjt said:
    After this bullshit matter finishes, Apple should consider creating the iCloud backup option that allows iOS to sync with an old password up to a week or 2 in case these idiots are asking for the backup after intentionally reset the iCloud password. That way, they don't have to deal with this kind of backdoor bullshit again ever.
    "You want to see what inside of that iPhone? Get the court order and I'll give you backup copy, then you're on your own. Don't ever ask me to get into that phone physically...ever."
    Apple did give them the iCloud backup data up to October 2015. After that the iPhone in question hadn't backed up to the cloud. It is the 'beyond October' data that the FBI wants, thus all the 'Make Apple break the encryption' BS since then. Apple advised them to bring the phone to a 'known' WiFi (such as at the man's work station or home) to have it sync to iCloud, but the FBI idiots already changed the iCloud password without knowing the previous password/passcode, thus preventing any future backups and instigating the All Writs Warrant.
  • Reply 52 of 56
    jmc54jmc54 Posts: 202member
    plovell said:
    If anyone here has not yet read Judge Ornstein's Order, I recommend that you do so right away. I know it's long (50 pages) but it does a superb demolition job on the FBI's arguments.

    And Comey will be well aware of the precedent this sets, and will have the FBI appeal it in New York. Ornstein has clearly foreseen this and his reasoning is quite extensive. He was well aware of the precedent-setting value of his Order (and noted it there).
    I didn't read it yet, so I hope this is it!!! https://epic.org/amicus/crypto/apple/Orenstein-Order-Apple-iPhone-02292016.pdf
  • Reply 53 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,442member
    Quote without comment from 9to5:

    "Yesterday, Comey introduced a new and, I would argue, much more effective phrase: ‘warrant-proof spaces.’ He is asking whether it is reasonable that Apple be allowed to create environments that cannot be penetrated by the government even when it comes armed with a search warrant.

    That’s a good argument. A search warrant is granted only when a judge has weighed up the balance of good and harm that would be done, and concluded that in the specific case in question, that it is right for law enforcement to conduct a search. We allow police officers to enter private houses when armed with a warrant. We let them search cars. Even open safe deposit boxes. Why not an iPhone?"



  • Reply 54 of 56
    gatorguy said:
    Quote without comment from 9to5:

    "Yesterday, Comey introduced a new and, I would argue, much more effective phrase: ‘warrant-proof spaces.’ He is asking whether it is reasonable that Apple be allowed to create environments that cannot be penetrated by the government even when it comes armed with a search warrant.

    That’s a good argument. A search warrant is granted only when a judge has weighed up the balance of good and harm that would be done, and concluded that in the specific case in question, that it is right for law enforcement to conduct a search. We allow police officers to enter private houses when armed with a warrant. We let them search cars. Even open safe deposit boxes. Why not an iPhone?"



    lol
    Let them open up the iPhone... all they need are screwdrivers.

  • Reply 55 of 56
    Urei1620Urei1620 Posts: 88member
    gatorguy said:
    Quote without comment from 9to5:

    "Yesterday, Comey introduced a new and, I would argue, much more effective phrase: ‘warrant-proof spaces.’ He is asking whether it is reasonable that Apple be allowed to create environments that cannot be penetrated by the government even when it comes armed with a search warrant.

    That’s a good argument. A search warrant is granted only when a judge has weighed up the balance of good and harm that would be done, and concluded that in the specific case in question, that it is right for law enforcement to conduct a search. We allow police officers to enter private houses when armed with a warrant. We let them search cars. Even open safe deposit boxes. Why not an iPhone?"

    The warrant should be served to the homeowner or resident of the house! Stop bothering the homebuilder for keys that they do not have since the homeowner changed all the locks. Pff. Ridiculous.

    But now, they want the homebuilder to break a wall or a roof to let the bastards in?

    I personally do not agree with Apple unlocking a phone (if they had the ability) that is owned by somebody else without first getting consent from the phone owner.
    edited March 2016
  • Reply 56 of 56
    fmalloyfmalloy Posts: 105member
    Mr. Comey is a fox in sheep's skin. He is showing his true color. It was never just "This one phone"!
    Yeah, you're right. Those bastards. We should just eliminate the FBI. Then, when the next terrorist attack, kidnapping, etc. take place no complaining, right?

    The FBI doesn't care one stupid bit about your boring selfies or droll texts. Don't flatter yourself - nobody cares about your stuff.
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