Will Apple's 9.7" iPad Pro take a chunk out of Microsoft Windows?

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  • Reply 21 of 87
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    jbdragon said:
    I think it can be a pc replacement for some people.  Not me,: have my Windows desktop for a number of reasons.  

    I don't really see iPads used for Photoshop or AudoCAD on such a small size screen!!! Normally you want a nice large screen.   I use my iPad while sitting orb the sofa or in bed, or at work for things like pdf manuals, or watching something while at lunch.  Sometimes other things.  

    If all you do is media consumption and some lite work, a iPad works just fine.  I think the mini it's pointless these days with big screen iPhone's!!! 

    Really, "lite work", always find this utterly funny, a Ipad with half the memory and theoretically half the CPU speed somehow manipulates 4K files with ease, which those big ass windows machine stutter with.

    99% of photoshop's functions can be done easily on and Ipad pro; speed of hardware is rarely what slows you down on most modern computers.
    Photoshop with it's mid 1990s interface is certainly not the summum on what's possible to be done on a modern hardware.

    Chainging workflow and habits is a hard nut to crack, but the fact that ARM is everywhere makes it now inevitable that the desktop paradigm is about to be upended.
    Even MS seems to ackowledge it in their latest strategic moves.

    Within 3 years your whole spiiel will seem quaint.

    99% of people don't do CAD work and even use VM machines; those people who don't do "real work" (sic) will buy those ARM based Pros and Laptops in droves.






    lattermanstudiochiaxamaxai46patchythepirate
  • Reply 22 of 87
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    FB said:
    Only those who are O.K. with incomplete solutions and crave Apple approval, or should it be Appleroval?
    A solution is complete if it feed your needs, everything else is just blah blah blah; most business needs are not CAD works, they're document manipulation and most of those manipulations can be done on a tablet with a keyboard (or not).
    As mobile becomes more and more important, workflow change and needs change.
    chiabb-15
  • Reply 23 of 87
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,324member
    ireland said:
    If I were Apple I'd pay $1B if necessary to Adobe to persuade them to bring PS-proper to iPad.

    And I'd send Autodesk a few hundred million to bring AutoCAD over.

    Apple has all the money in the world, they can use some here to achieve their goals for iPad. AutoCAD  Photoshop and a few apps such as these created for touch would make all the difference in the world to how the iPad is perceived for professional work. And once these apps happen most every other pro app will want to follow.
    I wouldn't pay them a dime. The ecosystem and massive market should be motivation enough.
    ericthehalfbeexamaxnolamacguy
  • Reply 24 of 87
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,791member
    iPad is a fabulous device but I would rather give up my career in programming and start making my living doing organic farming with no internet connection whatsoever than to  have to depend on an iPad for my only computing device.
    asdasdroger wade
  • Reply 25 of 87
    volcan said:
    iPad is a fabulous device but I would rather give up my career in programming and start making my living doing organic farming with no internet connection whatsoever than to  have to depend on an iPad for my only computing device.
    Do us (and yourself) a favor: go ahead.
    chiapscooter63jensonbmagman1979macplusplusnolamacguypatchythepirate
  • Reply 26 of 87
    chiachia Posts: 701member
    jbdragon said:
    I think it can be a pc replacement for some people.  Not me,: have my Windows desktop for a number of reasons.  

    I don't really see iPads used for Photoshop or AudoCAD on such a small size screen!!! Normally you want a nice large screen.   I use my iPad while sitting orb the sofa or in bed, or at work for things like pdf manuals, or watching something while at lunch.  Sometimes other things.  

    If all you do is media consumption and some lite work, a iPad works just fine.  I think the mini it's pointless these days with big screen iPhone's!!! 
    It astonishes me how blinkered, insular and lacking in awareness some people can be.

    Work isn't defined by how powerful your tool is but by what an individual is able to accomplish.

    Just what is "lite" work, a doctor referencing and writing reports on their iPad to save a patient's life, or a teenager playing yet another shooting game on a quad core i7 gaming rig?
    edited March 2016 jensonbmagman1979irelandradarthekatnolamacguyai46patchythepiratebb-15
  • Reply 27 of 87
    chiachia Posts: 701member

    When it comes to being productive and having access to software Windows is twice as good as osx and ten times ios.   The iPad will have no impact on Windows 
    The lack of productivity from your first post in Appleinsider doesn't bode well for your particular Windows device.
    tallest skilpscooter63jensonbmagman1979irelandJanNLnolamacguyai46
  • Reply 28 of 87
    appex said:
    "Will Apple's 9.7" iPad Pro take a chunk out of Microsoft Windows?"

    No way. For that Apple needs a Mac tablet.
    Yes way. The number of PC users who only got to be PC users, by the sheer demands of their jobs, or who went in "kicking and screaming" because of other external demands of the modern world, but only have simple needs and tasks for a "computer", once they discover the relative ease and simplicity of iOS and the well-built iPad, are most likely legion.
    jensonbchiairelandai46
  • Reply 29 of 87
    techlovertechlover Posts: 879member
    This article has all the fixings to start a flame war. From the title that is a question, to the content in the body.

    That being said it is an opinion piece and is fun to think about as long as things stay civil. Well done Mr. Fingas.

    We all know the answer. Apple has been chipping away at Microsoft's OS market share for years. A chunk? No. More like a nibble. But those nibbles really start to add up.

    Meanwhile Microsoft has been diversifying their business for years. Something Apple is smart to do as well. Relying on a few products is not a great place to be long term. The competition is great in hardware, software and services these days. Microsoft missed the mobile train by standing at the wrong station, and may never catch up to the others. But it's going to be a long while before Microsofts dominance will fade into the sunset. If ever.

    Another thing that comes to mind is that Chrome Books are steadily increasing in sales as well. This same article could be written with a title like "Will Chrome Books take a chunk out of iPad sales in education?" Maybe not a chunk, but at least a few nibbles.
    macplusplussingularity
  • Reply 30 of 87
    neutrino23neutrino23 Posts: 1,535member
    The point is not if an iPad can replace all old PCs, but can it replace many. To that I say yes, cautiously. If you simply try to replicate the same applications, forms and practices as before it will be hard. If you rebuild your business based on the strengths of the iPad then it should be easy. Most business people don't run PS or Autocad or Xcode. If you have access to information via a database program such as FileMaker, a CRM such as SalesForce, email, a browser a simple Office suite such as iWork you have covered well over half of what people do with older PCs. Lots of people in field sales, field service, training and applications, order entry, phone support, etc. don't use high end software. The biggest problem I see is legacy software that only runs on Windows, sometimes only XP. Lots of business software is available through apps or Safari (SAP, Concur, SalesForce, etc.) but what to do about some of the little utilities that are anchored in Windows? Maybe fast networks and VNC will come to the rescue?
    chia
  • Reply 31 of 87
    SteeleSteele Posts: 2member
    The iPad Pro needs more killer apps and iOS needs to somehow give the user more control over the file system (without compromising security and stability), for it to be a home run. 

    I score music. Notion is my app of choice for iOS. It's as powerful or more so than its OS X counterpart. I'll sketch and score full orchestral arrangements on my iPad Pro sometimes using the Apple Pencil, upload it to iCloud and open it either Finale, Sibelius or Digital Performer in OS X. This workflow is marvelous. I can now score from any location I like on a device that's the same size and shape as a piece of notation paper. Then mix it at my studio on the MacPros. Perfect! Almost. 

    However, the Surface Pro has an app called Staff Pad that is in some very important ways much more powerful than anything iOS can run. Staff Pad starts as a blank sheet of music paper and allows the composer to use a stylus to begin writing parts like one would on a piece of paper. This is a big part of an ideal workflow for a composer. Notion on the other hand has handwriting recognition but it's located in a small strip at the bottom of the screen. While I'm glad to have it, it's slow, inaccurate and visually non intuitive. Part of this is the apps fault, part is iOS and the iPads fault and part is that the Surface Pro has slightly more powerful hardware and a more flexible OS. 

    My usage may not be typical but I think it's crucial that Apple, while keeping the things that are great about the iPad Pro, (thin device, great battery life, stable and secure OS), also need to move in the direction of a "Mac Pad Pro". Apple has been slow to merge OS X and iOS while usually compromising OS X first to do this. Let's hope Apple doesn't ruin OS X in the process. 

    While there are good reasons for this approach (large enterprises clients like IBM, and Steve Jobs wish to keep iOS dead simple and nearly impossible to wreck), Apple needs to make a serious push to turn iOS into a scientist's, IT admin's and creative pro's dream of an OS. The needs of these types of users usually signals a well liked and usable OS. 

    MS has made many mistakes over the past decade but they timed the release of their tablet OS perfectly, making Apple look slow and out of touch at the same time. I just hope Apple has the right people to move iOS and OS X in the best direction. 
    roger wade
  • Reply 32 of 87
    allanfallanf Posts: 21member
    Another Pro is the recent dramatic enhancements by Micorsoft to their Remote Desktop apps for both iPads and Macs.  Since the latest versions could be downloaded I have not once picked up my new 12" MacBook or iPad Air 2.  My 12.9" iPad Pro is all I ever use for at home or on the road except for major projects requiring a really large screen and then my iMac with the public beta version of MS Remote Desktop is as good or better than sitting in front of my PC at work.
  • Reply 33 of 87
    ireland said:
    If I were Apple I'd pay $1B if necessary to Adobe to persuade them to bring PS-proper to iPad.

    And I'd send Autodesk a few hundred million to bring AutoCAD over.

    Apple has all the money in the world, they can use some here to achieve their goals for iPad. AutoCAD  Photoshop and a few apps such as these created for touch would make all the difference in the world to how the iPad is perceived for professional work. And once these apps happen most every other pro app will want to follow.
    Those apps would never run properly.  Ipad Pro has 2 GB's of usable RAM.  It would be a disaster.
  • Reply 34 of 87
    adamcadamc Posts: 580member
    Good opinion but totally irrelevant. You're reading it all wrong.

    Apple did not position the iPad Pro as a Windows PC replacement.

    There was a slide saying "Ultimate PC replacement" but prior to that slide Phil Schiller said "...many of them [windows users] will find that it's their ultimate PC replacement". See the keynote movie at 46:30.

    What is wrong with that?

    Many of them... If you knowingly or unknowingly disregard that "many of them" part, you're just mixing-up everything.
    I believe Schiller was referring to the basic stuffs these 600m PC users are using their PCs for namely answering emails, surfing the net, participate in social media etc. The heavy lifting work is still done on the desktops and laptops running the full OS.
    bb-15
  • Reply 35 of 87
    Soli said:
    Has MS's Surface endeavour turned a net profit after all the R&D and engineering they've put into that brand name?


    They certainly are trying very hard! The Surface Hub is now for sale. Priced at a pretty penny for the 55" and 84" versions.
    http://tinyurl.com/jf8h774

    The URL (The Verge) doesn't mention anything about the stands, which are also 2.5k+, according to another article I read.

    Soli
  • Reply 36 of 87
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,918member
    adamc said:

    Many of them... If you knowingly or unknowingly disregard that "many of them" part, you're just mixing-up everything.
    I believe Schiller was referring to the basic stuffs these 600m PC users are using their PCs for namely answering emails, surfing the net, participate in social media etc. The heavy lifting work is still done on the desktops and laptops running the full OS.
    Enjoy your heavy lifting work on the desktops and laptops, there is nothing wrong with that.

    It is when you fully master those desktops and laptops that you will switch to iPad ;-)
    edited March 2016
  • Reply 37 of 87
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,918member

    youngliz said:
    ireland said:
    If I were Apple I'd pay $1B if necessary to Adobe to persuade them to bring PS-proper to iPad.

    And I'd send Autodesk a few hundred million to bring AutoCAD over.

    Apple has all the money in the world, they can use some here to achieve their goals for iPad. AutoCAD  Photoshop and a few apps such as these created for touch would make all the difference in the world to how the iPad is perceived for professional work. And once these apps happen most every other pro app will want to follow.
    Those apps would never run properly.  Ipad Pro has 2 GB's of usable RAM.  It would be a disaster.
    Those apps would never run properly on the desktops and laptops either. They are monsters, relics of the past, memory and disk hungry old style programming...
  • Reply 38 of 87

    I think that with the appification evolution, generic software, like Word or Excel, starts to become less and less important. As a psychologist I used Word to write my notes in the dossier of my clients, nowadays I do this in dedicated software, friendly put in an app. Also for my financial stuff I don't use Excel anymore, again an app has taken over. Windows/Surface (and the Mac) is more practical to do generic stuff, while the Ipad is about apps. So the Ipad will be gaining more footprint in the corporate world just because of this evolution of the software world we work in. Think of outlook. That used to be one program for agenda, contacts, to do, and what not. Already, maybe not in outlook itself, but on other platforms all these functions have been divided into several apps that work together. The future for most programs will be appification, and perhaps some - to big perhaps - will not, and for those big computers with large screens remain. So I see the iPad slowly becoming more useful in the corporate world. My wife is on an iPad, and hasn't looked back on the computer she used. Sometimes we have to revert to my computer for some stuff, but it is becoming less and less.
    macpluspluspatchythepirate
  • Reply 39 of 87
    appex said:
    "Will Apple's 9.7" iPad Pro take a chunk out of Microsoft Windows?"

    No way. For that Apple needs a Mac tablet.
    People say this but Mac itself hasn't taken a big bite out of windows as of yet. A Mac tablet would likely not do much in the market. What Apple needs is worthwhile software for iOS and maybe something more in the file management department.
  • Reply 40 of 87
    There are many ifs and buts with the line of reasoning, but part of the problem with this utopian vision is that parts of iCloud are problematic, unreliable or a bit clunky. It needs more work.

    Still Microsoft can't crow too much, OneDrive is poor and trying to download updates can be variable. The business side is much better but then it cost, a lot!

    The best example of a cloud service is Dropbox. It really is EXCELLENT. I had an inclusive OneDrive subscription with office 365 but chose to continue paying for Dropbox. Both Apple and MS should take a look a that service.

    The other issue with cloud services is that it relies on a great internet connection. It's okay if you have 50Mbit, 100Mbit or even gigabit connections. In the UK that's a big variable IF! Where I live I'm lucky to get 3Mbit down so setting up my wife's new iPad from an iCloud backup took hours upon hours. Send she didn't have that much stuff. And sets downloading music. My new 128gb iPad mini is still going now!

    Even if you have a good internet connection it may not help. At work I compared an FTTC and ADSL connection. Speed test shows that the FTTC is over two times faster than the ADSL connection (55Mbit Down, 7 Mbit up v 22Mbit down v 1Mbit up), with similar latency on both.

    Durng the day on the FTTC connection any access to Apples CDS is limited to 150Kbps - 300Kbps, whereas the ADSL is chugging along at an average 2.5Mbps! Joke! During the evening the FTTC is upto a nice 4-6Mbps.

    And it happens on three other FTTC connections I have tried. The ISP's even admit traffic shaping!

    So until the Internet is much much better in every country (not just Korea and Spain), and ISP's improve their core network, then forget it.

    Apple really need to include a local document file system in iOS 10, a bit like how Dropbox works on OS X etc



    liquidmark
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