Microsoft set to axe nearly 2,000 jobs in bid to 'streamline' smartphone biz

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 37
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,820member
    Sad to hear about all those Finns losing their jobs. 

    It's tragic Nokia got hooked up with Microsoft. 
    Unfortunately, they got hooked up with MS a last gasp. They became irreverent with the rise of the smartphone and MS purchasing the hardware division of Nokia just prolonged the inevitable.
  • Reply 22 of 37
    delreyjonesdelreyjones Posts: 320member
    mike1 said:
    Sad to hear about all those Finns losing their jobs. 

    It's tragic Nokia got hooked up with Microsoft. 
    Unfortunately, they got hooked up with MS a last gasp. They became irreverent with the rise of the smartphone and MS purchasing the hardware division of Nokia just prolonged the inevitable.
    Right.  It wasn't Microsoft that killed Nokia, it was that Cupertino company and its loyal customers.  Or, with due respect to Mick Jagger:  "I shouted out who killed Nokia?, when after all it was you and me."
    edited May 2016 baconstangbadmonk
  • Reply 23 of 37
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,008member
    waverboy said:
    Unfortunately our company replaced our laptops with Surface Pro 2s, and everyone hates those buggy fussy POS.
    Should have bought Surface Pro 4s and all become Forensic Sketch artists! ;)
    pscooter63
  • Reply 24 of 37
    why-why- Posts: 305member
    macxpress said:
    I can't help but think of Steve Ballmer's reaction to the iPhone in 2007. Maybe if he had taken it more seriously they'd still be in the game today. Its unfortunate how much he killed Microsoft because of his arrogance. Not only did he do this for the iPhone, but many other Apple products.

    yeah the same thing happened to blackberry. I'll admit, I'll be very impressed if Microsoft finds a way to turn their phone business around
  • Reply 25 of 37
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    mike1 said:
    Unfortunately, they got hooked up with MS a last gasp. They became irreverent with the rise of the smartphone and MS purchasing the hardware division of Nokia just prolonged the inevitable.
    Right.  It wasn't Microsoft that killed Nokia, it was that Cupertino company and its loyal customers.  Or, with due respect to Mick Jagger:  "I shouted out who killed Nokia?, when after all it was you and me."
    BTW, Nokia's not "dead", man they just absorbed the remains of Alcatel-Lucent-Nortel. They're still a major equipment maker, one of the few that's left. They're just not really there in the consumer market anymore.
  • Reply 26 of 37
    anomeanome Posts: 1,243member
    macxpress said:
    I can't help but think of Steve Ballmer's reaction to the iPhone in 2007. Maybe if he had taken it more seriously they'd still be in the game today. Its unfortunate how much he killed Microsoft because of his arrogance. Not only did he do this for the iPhone, but many other Apple products.
    He thought he could do the same thing he did to Netscape in 95, where he laughed off the web (and web browsers) as a fad while they desperately tried to catch up and dump IE onto all machines.
    The problem is that Windows Phones couldn't really be bundled for free with every Windows installation, and not just because they got bit on anti-trust over the browser thing.

    And that's the secret to Microsoft's success: They can dominate any market they can force people to use their products. Once people get a choice, they start to struggle.
    pscooter63Rayz2016
  • Reply 27 of 37
    vukasikavukasika Posts: 77member
    With BYOD it's delusional to think a mythical 'Surface' phone is going to penetrate the enterprise. BYOD can't be put back into a bottle and Microsoft has little market share in the consumer space. Are businesses even replacing laptops with Surface Pro's? The company I work for has over 200,000 employees and we use Dell and HP laptops. I couldn't get a Surface Pro even if I wanted one. Also we just recently upgraded to Windows 7 and IE 11; we won't be on Windows 10 any time soon. Microsoft doesn't need to be in the phone hardware business. 
    I own 5 companies. BYOD is not acceptable at any of them. BYOD is a fast track to a compromised IT infrastructure. Use you devise on your time not mine. Doubtful the average employee in a BYOD environment is anywhere near as viligant about security as their employers need them to be.
  • Reply 28 of 37
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,735member
    vukasika said:
    With BYOD it's delusional to think a mythical 'Surface' phone is going to penetrate the enterprise. BYOD can't be put back into a bottle and Microsoft has little market share in the consumer space. Are businesses even replacing laptops with Surface Pro's? The company I work for has over 200,000 employees and we use Dell and HP laptops. I couldn't get a Surface Pro even if I wanted one. Also we just recently upgraded to Windows 7 and IE 11; we won't be on Windows 10 any time soon. Microsoft doesn't need to be in the phone hardware business. 
    I own 5 companies. BYOD is not acceptable at any of them. BYOD is a fast track to a compromised IT infrastructure. Use you devise on your time not mine. Doubtful the average employee in a BYOD environment is anywhere near as viligant about security as their employers need them to be.
    BYOD is pretty common these days in large organizations.
    magman1979williamlondonpscooter63
  • Reply 29 of 37
    theothergeofftheothergeoff Posts: 2,081member
    vukasika said:
    I own 5 companies. BYOD is not acceptable at any of them. BYOD is a fast track to a compromised IT infrastructure. Use you devise on your time not mine. Doubtful the average employee in a BYOD environment is anywhere near as viligant about security as their employers need them to be.
    BYOD is pretty common these days in large organizations.
    yes.  It's cheaper to have the end user provide their own phone and calling plan/data plan.  You multiply 10,000 phones by $2000 every 2 years, even stipending them $25 a month is a massive savings, and no hassle (chasing down corp phone users who love to watch netflix over LTE at home).  and the employee doesn't have to carry 2 phones.

    If you limit your BYOD choices to Samsung Knox, iOS, and WinPhone, and you actively manage your network and have an MDM, BYOD phones/tablets won't hit your top 10 of Infrastructure Security risks. 

    Maybe your top 10 in data loss risk, because the biggest risk in corp BYOD is the legalese about who can wipe your phone and when.  You get a salesperson who quits for a better job and takes his contact list with him, along with all his sales notes.  You state in your AUP the right to wipe the phone, she backs it up to her personal computer, and/or turns the phone  off and calls a lawyer and claims corp has no right to destroy personal information on a personal device.

    [been there done that, 4 times with 4 multi$B companies]

  • Reply 30 of 37
    koopkoop Posts: 337member
    Ballmer will go down as one of the worst tech CEOs of all time.
  • Reply 31 of 37
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    koop said:
    Ballmer will go down as one of the worst tech CEOs of all time.
    I think he already has. 

    They will write case studies on how he managed to snatch self-annihilation from the jaws of victory. If I hadn't been around to watch it, I'm not sure I would have believed it. 
  • Reply 32 of 37
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,069member
    vukasika said:
    With BYOD it's delusional to think a mythical 'Surface' phone is going to penetrate the enterprise. BYOD can't be put back into a bottle and Microsoft has little market share in the consumer space. Are businesses even replacing laptops with Surface Pro's? The company I work for has over 200,000 employees and we use Dell and HP laptops. I couldn't get a Surface Pro even if I wanted one. Also we just recently upgraded to Windows 7 and IE 11; we won't be on Windows 10 any time soon. Microsoft doesn't need to be in the phone hardware business. 
    I own 5 companies. BYOD is not acceptable at any of them. BYOD is a fast track to a compromised IT infrastructure. Use you devise on your time not mine. Doubtful the average employee in a BYOD environment is anywhere near as viligant about security as their employers need them to be.
    Sorry, but everything you say is complete nonsense. Most BYOD devices under proper MDM-control are safer than any corporate laptop has been for the last three decades. I doubt you own 5 companies, but you sure have zero clue about IT.
  • Reply 33 of 37
    starwarsstarwars Posts: 68member
    What's worth of nokia only its name (with some of its loyalty users) and their intellectual properties like patents, no else.
  • Reply 34 of 37
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,384member
    williamh said:
    Sad to hear about all those Finns losing their jobs. 

    It's tragic Nokia got hooked up with Microsoft. 
    I think those people were destined to lose their jobs whether or not they got hooked up with Microsoft.  Microsoft may even have kept Nokia afloat longer than it would have been.  I had a Nokia about 15 years ago before I started buying Sony "smart" phones and then iPhones.  Getting another Nokia has never crossed my mind.  That's just me, but I expect many people are the same.

    That's an interesting member name you chose.

    So your Nokia phones were prior to even them producing Smart phones, so you judge all their phones based on a phone from back then?  So when you go to buy an iPad, did you say "well the newton sucked, so why would I purchase another Apple tablet?"
    cnocbui
  • Reply 35 of 37
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,384member
    mike1 said:
    Unfortunately, they got hooked up with MS a last gasp. They became irreverent with the rise of the smartphone and MS purchasing the hardware division of Nokia just prolonged the inevitable.
    Right.  It wasn't Microsoft that killed Nokia, it was that Cupertino company and its loyal customers.  Or, with due respect to Mick Jagger:  "I shouted out who killed Nokia?, when after all it was you and me."

    Nokia didn't die, Nokia sold a dying business unit to MS for billions, while they carried on with their profitible business
    cnocbuixbit
  • Reply 36 of 37
    jimtjimt Posts: 16member
    mike1 said:
    Sad to hear about all those Finns losing their jobs. 

    It's tragic Nokia got hooked up with Microsoft. 
    Unfortunately, they got hooked up with MS a last gasp. They became irreverent with the rise of the smartphone and MS purchasing the hardware division of Nokia just prolonged the inevitable.
    Not to be picky, but don't you mean "irrelevant"?
  • Reply 37 of 37
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    hexclock said:
    Even if they do that, it will still run their awful operating system. 
    Whether people want it to or not.

    anome
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