Apple rumored to announce Apple Pay for the web at WWDC 2016

Posted:
in iPhone edited June 2016
Building on rumors claiming Apple Pay would see website integration this year, a report on Friday says Apple is planning to officially announce the new payment feature at its Worldwide Developers Conference keynote next week.




The report from Digital Trends is light on details, but the publication's sources say Apple is ready to announce Apple Pay website integration, which brings with it the promise of seamless touch-to-pay transactions on popular e-commerce sites. Apple is predicted to reveal the new branch of Apple Pay onstage at the WWDC 2016 keynote event on Monday, sources said.

While Apple has long been rumored to be working on website support for its in-house payments service, Re/code in March was first to attach a concrete timeline to a potential launch, saying the platform would debut later this year. At the time, it was said Apple plans to limit website transactions to a secure transaction process over which the company has full control, namely Safari for iOS on Touch ID-equipped iPhones and iPads.

In the intervening months rumors of a revamped MacBook Pro have surfaced. According to well-connected analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, Apple's new flagship laptop will sport some ilk of Touch ID technology, potentially embedded in an OLED touchbar component that replaces the top row of physical function keys. This would not only facilitate secure logins, but also introduce support for services like Apple Pay that are currently restricted to iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch.

Sources cited in today's report are not sure if users will be able to complete website purchases on devices lacking Touch ID, a current requirement for all Apple Pay transactions. Whether Apple plans to open the service to third-party web browsers is also unknown.

As for availability, Re/code believes Apple Pay website integration will be ready in time for the busy holiday shopping season.

AppleInsider will be on the scene at WWDC 2016 to offer live coverage of the event's most interesting news. Apple CEO Tim Cook and other top executives are expected to take the stage when the keynote kicks off on Monday, June 13 at 10 a.m. Pacific.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 3,979member
    I wish they'd announce more B&M stores that are accepting Pay. I love using it but too few stores allow it.
    bobschlob
  • Reply 2 of 24
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 598member
    finally....see you later PayPal 
    latifbpnolamacguypatchythepirate
  • Reply 3 of 24
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,591member
    I wish they'd announce more B&M stores that are accepting Pay. I love using it but too few stores allow it.
    I suspect that's more to do with B&M stores trying to hold off on buying NFC pay terminals.  Once the banks start charging them for fraudulent transactions then things will start to move. 

    In the UK, NFC is everywhere and Apple Pay is everywhere with it, even if the retail staff don't know it. 

    I bought some bits at a stately home gift shop a while back. Tapped the iPhone on the terminal while the young flappy-fringed youth looked at me like I'd lost my mind.  His eyes nearly fell out when the terminal beeped. "What did you just do??"

    I guess not all youngsters feel the need to keep up. Good for him. 
    Solichianolamacguypatchythepirate
  • Reply 4 of 24
    tjwolftjwolf Posts: 274member
    I'm curious: can iOS apps that allow in-app purchases already take advantage of ApplePay?  Most probably don't want to, given that Apple will get that 30% "commission" on top of the ApplePay transaction fee (0.12%).
  • Reply 5 of 24
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 907member
    It won't be as simple or easy as Apple Pay is at brick and mortar pay terminals, not at least with all web sites. It would require a great deal of conformity with site formatting or compliant apps to avoid things like keying in the payment amount, etc. I can only imagine a good deal of improvement with some payment portals that I have run across online -- many of them have lost my business since they want me to jump through hoops to pay. I have abandoned hundreds of shopping carts as a result.
  • Reply 6 of 24
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,825member
    tjwolf said:
    I'm curious: can iOS apps that allow in-app purchases already take advantage of ApplePay?  Most probably don't want to, given that Apple will get that 30% "commission" on top of the ApplePay transaction fee (0.12%).
    Vendors don't pay the Pay transaction fee, banks do, for the next couple years at least.
  • Reply 7 of 24
    tjwolftjwolf Posts: 274member
    crowley said:
    tjwolf said:
    I'm curious: can iOS apps that allow in-app purchases already take advantage of ApplePay?  Most probably don't want to, given that Apple will get that 30% "commission" on top of the ApplePay transaction fee (0.12%).
    Vendors don't pay the Pay transaction fee, banks do, for the next couple years at least.
    yes, I know that - I was just trying to describe what Apple gets overall - bad writing on my part.  Sorry.  But do you have an answer to my question?
  • Reply 8 of 24
    DRPDRP Posts: 1member
    I think it would be great if Apple could create a secure connection between your Touch ID enabled Apple device and Mac. One idea would be to create an Apple Trackpad/magic mouse with Touch-ID on the input device. Another more eyeopening idea...Imagine using your iPhone as a touchpad for your Mac desktop allowing wireless secure loggins, online purchases via the iPhone's touch ID. Just dreaming out loud, but this WWDC could be interesting.
    xamax
  • Reply 9 of 24
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,152member
    About damn time. 
  • Reply 10 of 24
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    About time.

    Here's how I think it will go down:

    Apple Pay will work with various vendors who want to support Apple Pay, the website backend will check of the device is an iOS device via the user agent and only present Apple Pay to iOS devices.

    For Desktop/Laptop devices, there will likely be a Bluetooth/WiFi sync that transfers the browser session over to the iOS device if there is no touch-id on the device. I can see touch-id enabled laptops and iMac's becoming a thing (an iMac would likely put the touch id on the bezel.) 

    There is where Google, Samsung et al have no chance of competing. Good luck getting "touch id"-like things into desktops, The only secure path is over the HDMI link. A USB fingerprint reader is not secure since you can just emulate it. (which is why "cloud based" biometric two-factor is a disaster waiting to happen), and USB-based EMV card readers have existed for well over 12 years. I have one in my junk-cable pile. Useful for reading the track information off chip cards, not useful for actually conducting a payment since exactly zero sites have a means to do EMV from a desktop.
  • Reply 11 of 24
    I saw a report in my Twitter feed (from Think/Google no less) that 30% of online shopping is now on mobile (which means iOS has about 24% of all online shopping).

    If true, that's a ridiculous amount of money. Even if Apple Pay only worked in Safari on iOS devices with Touch ID I could see the number of Apple Pay transactions skyrocketing. 
    chiapatchythepirate
  • Reply 12 of 24
    Rayz2016 said:
    I wish they'd announce more B&M stores that are accepting Pay. I love using it but too few stores allow it.
    I suspect that's more to do with B&M stores trying to hold off on buying NFC pay terminals.  Once the banks start charging them for fraudulent transactions then things will start to move. 

    In the UK, NFC is everywhere and Apple Pay is everywhere with it, even if the retail staff don't know it. 

    I bought some bits at a stately home gift shop a while back. Tapped the iPhone on the terminal while the young flappy-fringed youth looked at me like I'd lost my mind.  His eyes nearly fell out when the terminal beeped. "What did you just do??"

    I guess not all youngsters feel the need to keep up. Good for him. 
    Same thing here in Canada. Most retailers don't even know what I'm doing when I pay with my Watch but are quite impressed once I explain what's going on. 
    brucemc
  • Reply 13 of 24
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    tjwolf said:
    I'm curious: can iOS apps that allow in-app purchases already take advantage of ApplePay?  Most probably don't want to, given that Apple will get that 30% "commission" on top of the ApplePay transaction fee (0.12%).
    Pay takes the transaction fee from the banks, not the vendors
  • Reply 14 of 24
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,825member
    tjwolf said:
    crowley said:
    Vendors don't pay the Pay transaction fee, banks do, for the next couple years at least.
    yes, I know that - I was just trying to describe what Apple gets overall - bad writing on my part.  Sorry.  But do you have an answer to my question?
    Not sure that there would be much point in incorporating Pay into in-app purchases.  iTunes already has your bank details on file, just charge it directly.  Pay doesn't offer any UX advantages over click to pay where the vendor already has your billing information.  I suppose it's a bit better for security, but when iTunes is managing the transaction I don't think there's a big worry there.
    edited June 2016 pscooter63nolamacguylorin schultz
  • Reply 15 of 24
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    Hmmm ...

    I suspect that the way it will be implemented on a Mac will be similar to the way it is implemented on the Apple Watch -- The Mac will be paired with your iPhone, which is within BT/WiFi range.

    You currently can pair your iPhone with multiple watches, so adding Macs should require little change to iOS.

    Then at checkout, the user selects ApplePay, and Safari sends the token/packet to the bank.

    Apple would provide standard web code to be included in the vendors web site that:
    1. indicates that ApplePay is supported
    2. displays ApplePay Credit Cards available (from paired iPhone)
    3. allows user to select ApplePay Credit Card to be used for this transaction
    4. directs the iPhone to pay the charge (equivalent to waving the paired iPhone at the NFC Terminal)
    5. receives the approval/denial

    It should be fairly easy for any new or existing web site to accept ApplePay, and gain the benefits, thereof.

    It will be difficult for sites like Walmart or Home Depot to opt out of support for online ApplePay.

    Mega boom!


    edited June 2016
  • Reply 16 of 24
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    crowley said:
    tjwolf said:
    crowley said:
    Vendors don't pay the Pay transaction fee, banks do, for the next couple years at least.
    yes, I know that - I was just trying to describe what Apple gets overall - bad writing on my part.  Sorry.  But do you have an answer to my question?
    Not sure that there would be much point in incorporating Pay into in-app purchases.  iTunes already has your bank details on file, just charge it directly.  Pay doesn't offer any end-user advantages over click to pay where the vendor already has your billing information.

    Except, going forward, the vendor will not have your credit card info on their servers, where it can be hacked -- that's a very big advantage.

    edited June 2016
  • Reply 17 of 24
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 907member
    misa said:

    There is where Google, Samsung et al have no chance of competing. Good luck getting "touch id"-like things into desktops, The only secure path is over the HDMI link. A USB fingerprint reader is not secure since you can just emulate it. (which is why "cloud based" biometric two-factor is a disaster waiting to happen), and USB-based EMV card readers have existed for well over 12 years. I have one in my junk-cable pile. Useful for reading the track information off chip cards, not useful for actually conducting a payment since exactly zero sites have a means to do EMV from a desktop.
    Why can't a USB connected fingerprint reader be secure? Wired ethernet isn't necessarily secure, but it can be made secure in software. The same can be done over USB. Any data transmission can be encrypted. The program could accept only connections from readers with validly signed certificates. This would prevent copycat devices from working. The biggest problem with biometric readers is their design accepting poorly validated biometric data -- a camera accepting a cardboard cutout of the "owner," a fingerprint reader only checking fingerprint ridges/valleys and being fooled by a sticky tape impression or picture (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/29/german_minister_fingered_as_hackers_steal_her_thumbprint_from_a_photo/), etc.
  • Reply 18 of 24
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,507member
    linkman said:
    misa said:

    There is where Google, Samsung et al have no chance of competing. Good luck getting "touch id"-like things into desktops, The only secure path is over the HDMI link. A USB fingerprint reader is not secure since you can just emulate it. (which is why "cloud based" biometric two-factor is a disaster waiting to happen), and USB-based EMV card readers have existed for well over 12 years. I have one in my junk-cable pile. Useful for reading the track information off chip cards, not useful for actually conducting a payment since exactly zero sites have a means to do EMV from a desktop.
    Why can't a USB connected fingerprint reader be secure? Wired ethernet isn't necessarily secure, but it can be made secure in software. The same can be done over USB. Any data transmission can be encrypted. The program could accept only connections from readers with validly signed certificates. This would prevent copycat devices from working. The biggest problem with biometric readers is their design accepting poorly validated biometric data -- a camera accepting a cardboard cutout of the "owner," a fingerprint reader only checking fingerprint ridges/valleys and being fooled by a sticky tape impression or picture (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/12/29/german_minister_fingered_as_hackers_steal_her_thumbprint_from_a_photo/), etc.

    Why do you need any of that on the Mac?   The iPhone already has touchID, the secure element/enclave and the means to initiate and process ApplePay transactions.  An AppleWatch, when paired with an iPhone assumes the ability to initiate  ApplePay transactions -- while the processing of the transactions is left to the iPhone.

    I assume that:
    1. a Mac (and possibly other PCs) can be paired with the iPhone -- and the iPhone does the processing of ApplePay transactions initiated by the Mac.
    2. when you're using your computer that you would have your iPhone with you within BT/WiFi range.

    The transactions would be securely processed (by the iPhone) and the only information displayed on (sent to) the Mac is pictures of your credit cards showing the last 4 digits only.

    The reason that others can't compete is that Apple:
    1. has an install base of hundreds of millions of iPhones that qualify for ApplePay (and have a capable iOS version)
    2. has secure, efficient, fast payment process that runs on this large install base

    I wouldn't be surprised to see a later rollout where you can use your ApplePay on someone else's computer by ad hoc pairing.

    nolamacguyai46patchythepirate
  • Reply 19 of 24
    creek0512creek0512 Posts: 100member
    I wish they'd announce more B&M stores that are accepting Pay. I love using it but too few stores allow it.
    They can't even figure out if they want to use the chip reader or not. I go to the same store and sometimes it makes me use the chip reader, and sometimes a swipe is accepted.
  • Reply 20 of 24
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,825member
    crowley said:
    Not sure that there would be much point in incorporating Pay into in-app purchases.  iTunes already has your bank details on file, just charge it directly.  Pay doesn't offer any end-user advantages over click to pay where the vendor already has your billing information.

    Except, going forward, the vendor will not have your credit card info on their servers, where it can be hacked -- that's a very big advantage.

    Doubtful that will be the case for Apple itself any time soon.  Would any of the subscription services Apple offers be workable with Pay?
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