Adobe updates Creative Cloud with deep Stock integration, content-aware crop for Photoshop CC and m

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2016
Adobe on Tuesday released a set of substantial updates to its Creative Cloud family of products and services, including tight Adobe Stock integration and advanced technologies like facial recognition and content-aware photo cropping.




Continuing on its quest to offer creative professionals an all-inclusive suite of desktop and mobile tools, Adobe's June 2016 CC updates focus on incorporating new and existing features to a growing stable of software properties.

Adobe is touting deep Adobe Stock and CC Libraries integration as one of the more significant additions to its latest set of enhancements. Introduced last year as a standalone service, Adobe's online marketplace for images and video content has become an increasingly important facet to user workflows.

Stock is now a "One-Click Workflow," meaning users can quickly browse, license and integrate image assets directly from popular tools like Photoshop and Illustrator. In practice, Stock assets show up in an interactive CC Libraries toolbar pane through which users can search for, browse and purchase assets. Adobe is also rolling a one-click in-app purchasing feature into Photoshop.

The process of sharing assets with coworkers has also been simplified. Now, users can set CC library permissions to "view" or "edit" when inviting colleagues to collaborate on specific licensed images and video. The Collaborate menu function is available in Adobe's flagship apps which links to permissions controls on the CC web interface.




Additionally, Adobe today debuted the Adobe Stock Premium Collection, a sampling of more than 100,000 images from noted artists and photographers.

Looking ahead, professionals will be able to monetize their work through Adobe Stock directly from desktop and mobile apps including Lightroom CC, Bridge CC, Photoshop Fix and Photoshop Mix. A related service called the Stock Contributor Portal will feature handy monetization tools like automatic asset tagging for keyword-based search discovery.

As for new app technologies, Adobe is introducing a content-aware crop tool in Photoshop which automatically fills in blank areas of a canvas when an image is expanded or rotated beyond its original borders. The software can also recognize and modify facial features as part of the Liquify tool. Font menus are four time faster and content-aware is three times faster than previous versions.

Finally, Photoshop sports a font detection capability that recognizes typefaces in a variety of file types, including flattened JPEG images. The tool then suggests a similar font from a user's preinstalled library or searches online for an alternative Typekit download.

Other CC software enhancements include a character animator preview in After Effects CC, which matches animated assets to an actor's movements. Adobe Premiere Pro CC introduces a set of virtual reality features including a "field of view" mode for content previews, while Illustrator CC gets fast export capabilities for one-click exports into multiple formats and resolutions.

Adobe XD Preview also receives a minor buff with expanded support for German, French and Japanese.

Existing Creative Cloud subscribers can download the updates from Adobe today.

Pricing for new members depends on the application or software suite being purchased. For example, the Creative Cloud Photography plan, which comes with Photoshop CC and Lightroom CC, starts at $9.99 per month on an annual plan, while single-app subscriptions come in at $19.99 per month. Adobe offers an annual plan with access to all apps for $49.99 per month, while the step-up membership with a month of Adobe Stock access and 10 free Adobe Stock images is priced at $79.98 per month.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    I'll never upgrade beyond my current non-rentware version of Photoshop. Screw 'em... and their cloud too!
    jony0macky the mackydysamoria
  • Reply 2 of 22
    LoneStar88LoneStar88 Posts: 320member
    I'll never upgrade beyond my current non-rentware version of Photoshop. Screw 'em... and their cloud too!
    Spoken like a true dilettante.
    moreck
  • Reply 3 of 22
    LoneStar88LoneStar88 Posts: 320member
    As of this posting, I don't see the updates yet.
  • Reply 4 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    As of this posting, I don't see the updates yet

    I know it is a little confusing since it is referred to as June 2016 update but in reality it is version 2015.5
  • Reply 5 of 22
    mj webmj web Posts: 918member
    I'll never upgrade beyond my current non-rentware version of Photoshop. Screw 'em... and their cloud too!
    +1 > Until that fateful day Adobe abandons users who paid thousand$ for their CS6 licenses. I won't install Sierra on my 5K iMac until I confirm it doesn't break CS6. I'm a digital artist and have zero need or desire to use Adobe CC.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 6 of 22
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 912member
    mj web said:
    I'll never upgrade beyond my current non-rentware version of Photoshop. Screw 'em... and their cloud too!
    +1 > Until that fateful day Adobe abandons users who paid thousand$ for their CS6 licenses. I won't install Sierra on my 5K iMac until I confirm it doesn't break CS6. I'm a digital artist and have zero need or desire to use Adobe CC.
    exactly. thousands. some use the word dilettante, but are using it ignorantly.

    not only did many like me pay thousands per application, we then had to pay additional thousands just to upgrade to their "suites". then, they cast aside long-term, loyal, paying customers because they simply got lazy. i still scratch my head about why they decided not to continue to support standalone applications, it's still money in their pocket. were they really losing that much money to pirated versions of their software? it strikes me as typical of adobe to take the lazy way out, rather than push through and attempt to deliver a standalone software solution that discouraged pirating.


    macky the mackygatorguySpamSandwichdysamoriamj web
  • Reply 7 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    mac_dog said:

     it strikes me as typical of adobe to take the lazy way out, rather than push through and attempt to deliver a standalone software solution that discouraged pirating.
    Lazy? I've never seen so much development on the core CC apps. They have basically rewritten everything from scratch and we got hundreds of new features and improvements. The Adobe is lazy false narrative that was spread around when they first went with the subscription model turned out to be completely wrong. They have improved the applications in very big ways. The thing that was wrong with the stand alone software model was that it was a suite. Sometimes only a couple of apps had any substantial upgrades but you had to buy the entire suite every 18 months or so. Now they don't have to wait, if one of the apps is ready for release they just release it and the others come along when they are ready. The result is a much brisker update cycle. It is not a perfect solution for everyone but I like it a lot better and it is less expensive for those who used to update every release anyway.

    And it is not just Adobe that is using the subscription model, most of the big professional applications are adopting the same model. Apps like Office 365, AutoCad, Maya, and yes even Apple is promoting developers adopt the new subscription model announced at WWDC this year.
    edited June 2016 fastasleepmoreck
  • Reply 8 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    I'll never upgrade beyond my current non-rentware version of Photoshop. Screw 'em... and their cloud too!
    Spoken like a true dilettante.
    I've worked with Illustrator and Photoshop since the early 90s, genius.
    edited June 2016 dysamoria
  • Reply 9 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member

    volcan said:
    mac_dog said:

     it strikes me as typical of adobe to take the lazy way out, rather than push through and attempt to deliver a standalone software solution that discouraged pirating.
    Lazy? I've never seen so much development on the core CC apps. They have basically rewritten everything from scratch and we got hundreds of new features and improvements. The Adobe is lazy false narrative that was spread around when they first went with the subscription model turned out to be completely wrong. They have improved the applications in very big ways. The thing that was wrong with the stand alone software model was that it was a suite. Sometimes only a couple of apps had any substantial upgrades but you had to buy the entire suite every 18 months or so. Now they don't have to wait, if one of the apps is ready for release they just release it and the others come along when they are ready. The result is a much brisker update cycle. It is not a perfect solution for everyone but I like it a lot better and it is less expensive for those who used to update every release anyway.

    And it is not just Adobe that is using the subscription model, most of the big professional applications are adopting the same model. Apps like Office 365, AutoCad, Maya, and yes even Apple is promoting developers adopt the new subscription model announced at WWDC this year.
    Nonsense. You used to simply pay upgrade pricing.

    Also, high-end CAD software typically required an annual contract and included services including training.
    edited June 2016
  • Reply 10 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    SpamSandwich said:

    Nonsense. You used to simply pay upgrade pricing.
    I thought that would have been obvious.

    Even if you owned something less than the Master Collection, the upgrade price was still more than the subscription price is today and now you get way more applications. The only way it would have been less is if you didn't upgrade every cycle. And don't forget that now you get two licenses that can be used simultaneously and on two different platforms. Another big benefit for a professional studio. Again, I realize it is not for everyone, but people who make their living using Adobe applications are making more than $50 an hour. You make enough in one hour to pay for the monthly subscription. Furthermore, if you truly are a graphics art professional you'll want to stay on the most current version for compatibility with collaborators.
    moreck
  • Reply 11 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    volcan said:
    SpamSandwich said:

    Nonsense. You used to simply pay upgrade pricing.
    I thought that would have been obvious.

    Even if you owned something less than the Master Collection, the upgrade price was still more than the subscription price is today and now you get way more applications. The only way it would have been less is if you didn't upgrade every cycle. And don't forget that now you get two licenses that can be used simultaneously and on two different platforms. Another big benefit for a professional studio. Again, I realize it is not for everyone, but people who make their living using Adobe applications are making more than $50 an hour. You make enough in one hour to pay for the monthly subscription. Furthermore, if you truly are a graphics art professional you'll want to stay on the most current version for compatibility with collaborators.
    Many printers and other physical print-based houses stick with the old versions of the software because upgrades are often incompatible with their equipment. Don't kid yourself.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 12 of 22
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,835member
    I think it's somewhat hilarious that Adobe keeps pushing their apps in the cloud, when what I actually want is my documents to be built in the cloud, from anywhere.

    Can you build InDesign docs in iCloud or Dropbox yet?
  • Reply 13 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    SpamSandwich said:
    Many printers and other physical print-based houses stick with the old versions of the software because upgrades are often incompatible with their equipment. Don't kid yourself.
    Almost nobody sends working files to the printer and those who do are sending up to date versions that are incompatible with old software. Furthermore the only type of file that sees any proofing or plate making equipment is all PDFx work flow in signatures. I can see you have been out of the business for a number of years. I do almost a million dollars worth of printing every year and have done so for more than 20 years. I absolutely know what I am talking about.
    edited June 2016 fastasleep
  • Reply 14 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    frank777 said:
    I think it's somewhat hilarious that Adobe keeps pushing their apps in the cloud, when what I actually want is my documents to be built in the cloud, from anywhere.

    Can you build InDesign docs in iCloud or Dropbox yet?
    You can't build documents in the cloud the way you can with iWork but you can absolutely save them to Adobe cloud which does allow you to work from anywhere but you would need to download the documents if you were on a different computer. inDesign documents are very different and much more complex than say Google apps or Office docs because they are usually asset based. One really useful feature of Adobe Cloud is collaboration. You can build a library of assets and share them with coworkers around the globe and assign various permissions.
    edited June 2016
  • Reply 15 of 22
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    Still not interested. They lost me at "subscription". They only care about the customers that can afford subscription plans. Mostly that's corporate or successful individual business, not fine artists or hobbyists. They've only justified piracy by locking out the smaller end users, not caused a successful injury strike against it. 
  • Reply 16 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    volcan said:
    SpamSandwich said:
    Many printers and other physical print-based houses stick with the old versions of the software because upgrades are often incompatible with their equipment. Don't kid yourself.
    Almost nobody sends working files to the printer and those who do are sending up to date versions that are incompatible with old software. Furthermore the only type of file that sees any proofing or plate making equipment is all PDFx work flow in signatures. I can see you have been out of the business for a number of years. I do almost a million dollars worth of printing every year and have done so for more than 20 years. I absolutely know what I am talking about.
    Almost a million? I used to be involved in projects that big at least every quarter. You're not impressing anyone and the appeals to authority are tiresome. Your experience is your own and I don't dispute that, but don't try to paint it as typical.
    edited June 2016
  • Reply 17 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    SpamSandwich said:
    Almost a million? I used to be involved in projects that big at least every quarter. You're not impressing anyone and the appeals to authority are tiresome. Your experience is your own and I don't dispute that, but don't try to paint it as typical.
    As I suspected you "used" to do projects... By your comments it is clear that you've been out of the business for many years. 
  • Reply 18 of 22
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    volcan said:
    SpamSandwich said:
    Almost a million? I used to be involved in projects that big at least every quarter. You're not impressing anyone and the appeals to authority are tiresome. Your experience is your own and I don't dispute that, but don't try to paint it as typical.
    As I suspected you "used" to do projects... By your comments it is clear that you've been out of the business for many years. 
    You're brilliant and unappreciated. How could I possibly miss that?
    pulseimages
  • Reply 19 of 22
    moreckmoreck Posts: 187member
    These idiots railing against the subscription model really amuse me. Do the math and you'll find that in the long-run it's actually far cheaper to pay for the subscription.
    pulseimages
  • Reply 20 of 22
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    SpamSandwich said

    You're brilliant and unappreciated. How could I possibly miss that?
    Pretty much a no brainier. I have a lot of experience watching dinosaurs drop out of the business. The printing business has become so competitive in the last 10 years, if you are not using cutting edge technology you'll be gone in no time at all. Your archaic notions totally disqualify you as any authority on the matter.





    edited June 2016 singularity
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