Two-thirds of US iPhone owners have a 2+ year old device, are prime for upgrades

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 57
    dougddougd Posts: 292member
    My iPhone 6+ is fine. No need to upgrade
  • Reply 42 of 57
    Fix the design bug introduced with the iPhone 6 series, move the power button somewhere else besides directly opposite the volume buttons, and I'll swap out my 6 plus.  Until then, there isn't anything Apple could do at this point to lure me.  They've been sitting on enough dangling carrots for future models, to try and keep the upgrade demand stable, but I'm not playing that game.  I'll wait long enough until there is ample reason to upgrade.  For anyone who has a 6 or 6s series, this year's minimal change is definitely not worth an upgrade.
    glynh
  • Reply 43 of 57
    Fix the design bug introduced with the iPhone 6 series, move the power button somewhere else besides directly opposite the volume buttons, and I'll swap out my 6 plus.  Until then, there isn't anything Apple could do at this point to lure me.  They've been sitting on enough dangling carrots for future models, to try and keep the upgrade demand stable, but I'm not playing that game.  I'll wait long enough until there is ample reason to upgrade.  For anyone who has a 6 or 6s series, this year's minimal change is definitely not worth an upgrade.
  • Reply 44 of 57
    jumpcutterjumpcutter Posts: 100member
    I will not be "upgrading" to an iPhone 7 because Apple is being silly taking away the headphone jack.There is no reason other than forcing customers into buying additional accessories like a "new" even more expensive lightning port headset. It is a greed thing. Apple should look at fixing it's screen sensitivity issues. I am always making unwanted phone calls or going into an app I did not want. Apple's remedy to that problem was to reset my iPhone which cleared out my settings and did nothing to fix the screen sensitivity issue. This is very annoying. I will not help support Apple anymore until they learn to listen to their customer's complaints and fix things. 
  • Reply 45 of 57
    chadbkchadbk Posts: 9member
    No headphone jack, terrible battery life, and an insanely high price for the current 64gb model, and it looks like we're all going to be forced to buy 128gb for $129 more, even though we don't need it, just like the new iPads, iPhone just isn't worth it anymore...and you wonder why macs have slipped to 5th place in world wide sales, they removed almost all the ports, and jacked up the price, not worth it anymore.
  • Reply 46 of 57
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 1,304member
    Being "prime for upgrades" doesn't mean people are going to do so.  
  • Reply 47 of 57
    toddzrxtoddzrx Posts: 254member
    brucemc said:
    Well, I agree with you, that if the only change from the 6s series to the iPhone 7 is the removal of the headphone jack, that sales will indeed not be great.

    On the other hand, an iPhone 7 just might have:
    - Great improvement in CPU/GPU, enabling new on-board/local learning functions as we saw introduced in iOS 10
    - Significantly improved camera.  Perhaps the OIS for photos and videos along lines of the 6s Plus, but not in the 4.7" 6s.
    - Dual camera with potential "wow features" on the 7 Plus.
    - 32GB as base model for storage, with 128GB next model.  Reason alone to upgrade for many.
    - Significantly improved screen - wide colour and True Tone, better daylight visibility, reduced reflection (all on the latest iPad Pro)

    All seem like pretty reasonable features to expect, and for someone on the iPhone 5s or earlier, getting all that + the 6s feature set, seems compelling to me (I am on 5s and will be upgrading for certain).
    But how many typical (i.e., non-tech) customers will care about any of that?  I'm technically oriented, and nothing on that list makes me want to upgrade and I am also on a 5S.  The only compelling item is the 32GB of storage, but that in itself isn't a reason to upgrade since most everyone that needed more storage on their current phone probably threw down for it anyway; it's just nice if you happen to be in the market.  Yes, your list has decent upgrades, but there's nothing there that will "wow" the typical iPhone customer.  Deleting the headphone jack will just make them more skeptical.
  • Reply 48 of 57
    lkrupp said:
    eightzero said:
    I don't need a new iPhone. My 5s works just fine, does everything I need or want.
    Your opinion doesn’t count. Neither does mine. No AI commenter’s opinion counts in matters like this. We’re talking about the mass market and no one here is part of the mass market. This entire AI community is composed of pro and anti biased individuals. There is no objectivity on forums like AI. None, only axes to grind one way or the other. We’ll just have to wait and see what happens.

    And just to reinforce your point, my iPhone 6S+ is getting a little long in the tooth, so I'll buy the new one this fall. My iPhone SE will continue to be my spare phone!
  • Reply 49 of 57
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    toddzrx said:
    brucemc said:
    Well, I agree with you, that if the only change from the 6s series to the iPhone 7 is the removal of the headphone jack, that sales will indeed not be great.

    On the other hand, an iPhone 7 just might have:
    - Great improvement in CPU/GPU, enabling new on-board/local learning functions as we saw introduced in iOS 10
    - Significantly improved camera.  Perhaps the OIS for photos and videos along lines of the 6s Plus, but not in the 4.7" 6s.
    - Dual camera with potential "wow features" on the 7 Plus.
    - 32GB as base model for storage, with 128GB next model.  Reason alone to upgrade for many.
    - Significantly improved screen - wide colour and True Tone, better daylight visibility, reduced reflection (all on the latest iPad Pro)

    All seem like pretty reasonable features to expect, and for someone on the iPhone 5s or earlier, getting all that + the 6s feature set, seems compelling to me (I am on 5s and will be upgrading for certain).
    But how many typical (i.e., non-tech) customers will care about any of that?  I'm technically oriented, and nothing on that list makes me want to upgrade and I am also on a 5S.  The only compelling item is the 32GB of storage, but that in itself isn't a reason to upgrade since most everyone that needed more storage on their current phone probably threw down for it anyway; it's just nice if you happen to be in the market.  Yes, your list has decent upgrades, but there's nothing there that will "wow" the typical iPhone customer.  Deleting the headphone jack will just make them more skeptical.
    Non tech consumers may care about the much better screen, lower reflectivity, brighter and yes, even better colors (were talking about people buying a premium phone after all).
    Dual Camera is something that certainly can sell to the average non tech users. Do you need to be a techie to use a camera? A good easy to use camera has been a major selling point of Iphones. In fact, camera improvements is something that everyone can understand, it's not like Phone cameras have no improvement left in that area.
    If they get a lot more local SIRI functions

    IOS 10 makes a better job of selling 3D Touch (which is not new, but a selling point for people with older phones).

    Having a much faster GPU/CPU is certainly important if you come from a 5s, 5c and 4s. For those people, it will be night and day.

    Again, funny how you'd dismiss non teche's noticing the GPU/CPU when IOS smoothness is one of the major selling point of Apple. People BUY it because they now this power actually shows up when they use it.

    I wouldn't be surprised if the new bigger phone also has a digitizer like in the Ipad pros; selling more pens and creating a bigger ecosystem for pen enabled apps.


    brucemc
  • Reply 50 of 57
    volcanvolcan Posts: 1,799member
    If the typical two-year upgrade cycle holds steady, Apple could be in line for a major "iPhone 7" product cycle, with a majority of existing iPhone users due for a new handset, according to a new survey.
    Fascinating observation. At least here in the US, a two year refresh cycle based on typical contracts has been routine since the 3Gs came out. How are two year old phones ready for upgrade such an unusual phenomena now?

    apple ][ said:

    iSRS said:
    Just pay full retail without the monthly plan
    Agreed. Screw contract phones. I am paying for my iPhone in full, and I will own it 100%, fully unlocked. :#



    Why buy at full retail price when you can get an unlocked phone with an interest free loan from Apple? That's the way your buddy Trump does business. Use other people's money.



  • Reply 51 of 57
    I'm in the same boat as many here. I've got an iPhone 6 that works well and the iPhone 7's feature set is just not that compelling to jump to. I've upgraded with every cycle and have seen incremental improvements that have been worth the jump each time. Now, not so much. As an Apple shareholder I'd like to see great acceptance of the new phone, but I'm holding my breath on this one. Apple stock is pretty beat up right now. Are we going to see more of the same? Oh no! With that said, I may be a part of that problem. All kidding aside, Apple does need to produce more of the "killer" products that we've seen in the past. At issue though are questions regarding the technology and what's available. Are we at a point of stagnation with current tech? Lots of questions...
  • Reply 52 of 57
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,289member
    seankill said:
    My iPhone 6+ will be turning 2 but I will hold out for the 2017 iPhone. This year's iPhone might be a nice upgrade but I don't anticipate anything being a must-have to the point its worth 850$. Smartphones are maturing much like the PC market did years ago, its most an evolutionary process except every 5-6 years.
    I agree, my iPhone 6 is turning 2 years old. I have upgraded at least every 2 years since the first iPhone in 2007.  This is the first time I'm considering keeping my current phone past its contract end date.  Apple needs to take some risks and be a bit more aggressive vs play it safe with incremental changes.  
    People who said that earlier before the phone out turned to be one of the first who line up to get it. Ironic, isn't it? I would rather reserve any decision until I have a chance to see and hold it in my hand. Or at least wait until the official announcement.
  • Reply 53 of 57
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,254member
    I'd upgrade but I still love my iPhone 6.apple ][ said:
    lkrupp said:
    For the same reason we all do. To spout bullshit.
    I come here mainly to battle Fandroids and to make fun of disgusting liberals. :#
    The joke's on you.
  • Reply 54 of 57
    rhoninrhonin Posts: 60member
    I agree, my iPhone 6 is turning 2 years old. I have upgraded at least every 2 years since the first iPhone in 2007.  This is the first time I'm considering keeping my current phone past its contract end date.  Apple needs to take some risks and be a bit more aggressive vs play it safe with incremental changes.  
    you guys make it sound like Apple has a hopper of new features, fully-formed, complete, and ready to drop into the phone at any time, but that they dont do it because they want to trick you with incremental improvements. its rather silly. that isnt how product development works. iterative improvement is the name of the game. these things dont design or improve themselves...you have to do the work to get there from here. a year is not a lot of time. thus you see iterative improvements. people would be whining their heads off if apple waited 2-3 years+ between new iphone announcements.
    But ... It has been fairly well trotted out that the 2017 model will be the device to get.  So unless you really have to get one or get a great deal why get the 7?  
  • Reply 55 of 57
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    You make calls on a wireless cell network, use wireless data, probably use a wireless remote to get in your car, use a wireless TV remote, likely use wireless with your laptop, but by golly if they take away a fifty year old headphone jack, you're going to put your foot down.
    I have both wired and wireless headphones. The sound quality of my wired ones is so much better. But I'm sure Apple will make a $30 adapter for people's existing headphones. Anytime Phil can get people to spend additional money (like I did with the 29W adapter for my iPad Pro which stupidly doesn't come in the box) Tim's a happy camper. 
    That's right, because rather than improve the quality of wireless audio to compete or surpass the quality of your wired headphones, Apple will just sell you an adapter so you can keep using your old headphones, rather than be motivated to buy a pair of new and better wireless headphones. You always make so much sense with your comments. /s
  • Reply 56 of 57
    sandorsandor Posts: 663member
    eightzero said:
    I don't need a new iPhone. My 5s works just fine, does everything I need or want.

    this is precisely how i feel.

    I have a 5s that does everything i need.
    my wife has a 5c she doesnt want to part with.

    it is purely economic - there are too many expenditures more important than a new phone that would barely offer any different user experience.
  • Reply 57 of 57
    joshajosha Posts: 901member
    dougd said:
    My iPhone 6+ is fine. No need to upgrade
    My iPhone5c, which replaced my 4.5yr old iPhone4, is only a year old. I'll use it for several more years.

    Here in Canada Apple charges far too much for the iPhones.
    They charge the top USA/CDA exchange rate of  about 35%, 
      but the iPhones are manufactured in countries where the exchange rate to CDA has only changed about 10%.
    A price of C$1,000+ for a basic  iPhone6 is just too much and Apple makes excessive profit in CDA!
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