Samsung's new Galaxy Note 7 largely incremental, except for iris scanner

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 73

    The next big feature will be a sphincter scanner  -- for secure butt-texting!

    pscooter63igorskybaconstang
  • Reply 22 of 73
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    ireland said:
    Would you let Samsung scan your iris?
    Ok, they have an image of my Iris.  Just what exactly are they going to do with it that I should be afraid of?
  • Reply 23 of 73
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    First, please no making the iris scanner such a huge deal merely because Apple is implementing one next year. Several Android devices already have iris scanners, including even ZTE, a budget device maker, who introduced one in 2015. Qualcomm put iris scanning support in their SOCs awhile ago, so I have no idea why it is taking so long for the device makers to enable the feature in their phones.

    Second, I am sick of Samsung. They are lily-livered cowards. Their first design proposals are often really interesting and boundary-pushing stuff, and then they get scared, retreat and just release iterations. They wait until Motorola, LG, Huawei, Google, Asus or Apple implements it instead, and THEN they put the idea that they kicked around into the next phone.

    Their first proposal for the Galaxy Note 7 (Galaxy Note 6 at the time) was awesome. It was going to be 6' (or 5.9'), have 6-8 GB of RAM, dual boot Android and Windows 10, and come with a laptop dock where the USB Type C port would connect to a keyboard, the MHL out in the USB Type C would drive the laptop screen, and the CPU and OS would reside on the phone. But like Samsung always does, they whittle it down, whittle it down until now the Galaxy Note 7 is basically just a bigger Galaxy S7 Edge.

    The funny thing: other companies are now implementing their own versions of what Samsung was RUMORED to be doing with the Galaxy Note. A $99 laptop dock for an Android phone has passed $1 million on Kickstarter and is on the verge of reaching their stretch goals. And a Chinese company named Akyumen is marketing a Holophone that will dual boot Android and Windows 10, and will run on an x86 PC CPU, not a mobile SOC. They offer various docking options as accessories, and they have had 1 million preorders for the thing.

    So companies who were motivated by the rumors of what Samsung was going to do came out with products that they thought that they could use to compete with the Galaxy Note. Ridiculous. Maybe Android smartphone fans should buy the competitors' products and leave cowardly Samsung alone.
    I'm not sure I quite follow.  Did Samsung actually state these intentions concerning the Note 7 or was it just a rumour?
    revenant
  • Reply 24 of 73
    rwesrwes Posts: 158member
    Baldwyn said:
    I don't even have to turn my phone on for Samsung Pay. With the screen off, I swipe up from the home button and my card comes up. I touch the fingerprint sensor, it vibrates and I'm done. With the iris scanner, I'll swipe up, look at my phone, and tap it to the POS reader. What could be easier? 

    BTW, you have the weight of the N7 listed as 345 grams, where It should be at 169. Big difference there. 

    That's Apples original implementation actually. The (iOS) device doesn't have to be woken up first; the other poster who mentioned waking their phone may not know.

    When near a NFC capable terminal, once within range, the device will wake and show a list of cards. If you then rest your finger on the home button, it'll pay with the default card. Otherwise, you can switch cards before and and then rest your finger. Phone vibrates and once moved away from terminal, it'll go back to sleep on its own.

    Both (Apple and Samsung) implementations are nice, fast and smooth (if a user knows).
    edited August 2016 gwydioncnocbuizimmermannpscooter63
  • Reply 25 of 73
    gwydiongwydion Posts: 1,067member
    cali said:
    First, please no making the iris scanner such a huge deal merely because Apple is implementing one next year. Several Android devices already have iris scanners, including even ZTE, a budget device maker, who introduced one in 2015. Qualcomm put iris scanning support in their SOCs awhile ago, so I have no idea why it is taking so long for the device makers to enable the feature in their phones.

    Second, I am sick of Samsung. They are lily-livered cowards. Their first design proposals are often really interesting and boundary-pushing stuff, and then they get scared, retreat and just release iterations. They wait until Motorola, LG, Huawei, Google, Asus or Apple implements it instead, and THEN they put the idea that they kicked around into the next phone.

    Their first proposal for the Galaxy Note 7 (Galaxy Note 6 at the time) was awesome. It was going to be 6' (or 5.9'), have 6-8 GB of RAM, dual boot Android and Windows 10, and come with a laptop dock where the USB Type C port would connect to a keyboard, the MHL out in the USB Type C would drive the laptop screen, and the CPU and OS would reside on the phone. But like Samsung always does, they whittle it down, whittle it down until now the Galaxy Note 7 is basically just a bigger Galaxy S7 Edge.

    The funny thing: other companies are now implementing their own versions of what Samsung was RUMORED to be doing with the Galaxy Note. A $99 laptop dock for an Android phone has passed $1 million on Kickstarter and is on the verge of reaching their stretch goals. And a Chinese company named Akyumen is marketing a Holophone that will dual boot Android and Windows 10, and will run on an x86 PC CPU, not a mobile SOC. They offer various docking options as accessories, and they have had 1 million preorders for the thing.

    So companies who were motivated by the rumors of what Samsung was going to do came out with products that they thought that they could use to compete with the Galaxy Note. Ridiculous. Maybe Android smartphone fans should buy the competitors' products and leave cowardly Samsung alone.
    NO ONE GIVES A SH** what an android device is doing. All eyes are always on Apple and Apple only.


    Poor guy, can't afford iPhone so you settled for a knockoff. Tough. The biggest laugh for me is how Sammy claims it works just like a stripe and you hold the iKnockoff up to the terminal, yet they wanna add iris scanning? What a clusterf*** and must look silly for knockoff users. Imagine?
    Are you for real or arre you just acting?
    revenant
  • Reply 26 of 73
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,016member
    Surprisingly small too for  a large 5.7" display. 153.5 X 73.9 X 7.9 mm, 169g light. Hard to believe it's that narrow, probably good feel in the hand. 

    Still won't buy one (and just because it's Samsung), but the new Note does seem like a darn nice device. 
  • Reply 27 of 73
    Baldwyn said:
    I don't even have to turn my phone on for Samsung Pay. With the screen off, I swipe up from the home button and my card comes up. I touch the fingerprint sensor, it vibrates and I'm done. With the iris scanner, I'll swipe up, look at my phone, and tap it to the POS reader. What could be easier?

    Apple Pay usuability differs from your understanding of it. You do not need to awaken, unlock, nor open Wallet app to use Apple Pay. In fact, your iPhone can be sleeping and you just hover it over a NFC terminal, and like magic, your cards popup automatically on the screen. In fact, Apple Pay works seamlessly when doing any task on the iPhone, doesn't matter what app is open, Apple Pay pops up whenever placed near a readied terminal. Then just authenticate with Touch ID. Done. Still easier than Samsumg Pay. One less step.
    patchythepiratechiaigorskybaconstangnetmageSpamSandwich
  • Reply 28 of 73
    xmhillxxmhillx Posts: 108member
    Baldwyn said:
    I don't even have to turn my phone on for Samsung Pay. With the screen off, I swipe up from the home button and my card comes up. I touch the fingerprint sensor, it vibrates and I'm done. With the iris scanner, I'll swipe up, look at my phone, and tap it to the POS reader. What could be easier? 

    BTW, you have the weight of the N7 listed as 345 grams, where It should be at 169. Big difference there. 

    I'm afraid it won't be as simple as "I'll swipe up, look at my phone".

    I assume most likely you'll have to position the phone correctly in front of your face, you know, so the iris scanner is scanning your iris. You can't just say "look at my phone", that implies you can look at your phone while the camera is angled away towards the ceiling or something; in other words, you can look at your phone while the camer isn't looking at your face. You can touch the fingerprint scanner in any orientation and any position the phone is in, but the iris scanner would need to be directly in front of your face and close enough to your eyes. It's a little more cumbersome, so I don't see it as an improvement or replacement. But rather as an optional supplement to security authentication. 
    edited August 2016 netmage
  • Reply 29 of 73
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,424member
    apple ][ said:
    I wouldn't be surprised if more than 50% of Fandroids do not even know what an iris is.

    As for this so called "iris scanner", it is most likely another cheap Samsung gimmick that won't function properly, and the world will have to wait until Apple does it properly, just like with everything else.
    This is yet again another futile attempt by Samsung to say they came out with something first - like it did with their Samsung watch.  It will fail spectacularly, they'll make fun of Apple for "copying" them when Apple comes out with it on their next iPhone, and then immediately shut its pie-hole when Apple's version not only works flawlessly, but the design is clean and disappears.

    Then of course, Samsung will copy the design verbatim for their next phone and just whine "it was the obvious next step".

    Just wait...
    xmhillxpatchythepirateapple ][baconstangmejsricgtrnetmageSpamSandwich
  • Reply 30 of 73
    bilbo63bilbo63 Posts: 285member
    I sure hope Apple does not move to an iris scanner. That will make the user experience worse – not better.

    Touch ID works great and it's SEAMLESS, it unlocks pretty much instantly as we wake up our device. It's secure, dead easy and we needn't take any extra steps or do anything differently. Holding my phone to my eye for authorization is an additional and unnecessary step. Furthermore I can see that being an issue if you wear glasses and there is a glare on them. Stupid. Stupid. Stupid. I hope the whole iris scanner rumour was nothing but a smokescreen to get Samsung chasing their tails again.
    edited August 2016 xmhillxbaconstangnetmagejmc54
  • Reply 31 of 73
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 649member
    maestro64 said:

    I can see it now, watching some idiot holding the phone camera up to your eye to unlock it an pay. Yeah it is going to pure entertainment in the check out lines.

    Just last week I had to wait as some Android use try to go through all the steps to pull up his frequent buyer card and get the cashier to scan it then going through the steps to pay, it was an ordeal to say the least. Then I walk up an popup apple wallet and scanned my card, then paid with my watch in a matter of a few seconds. People just do not really how easy Apple made this process. People are still amazed how quickly I do things with the phone and watch.


    Curious. I have seen plenty of Android users have absolutely no problem with Android Pay, and none with Google Wallet before then. It may have been a reflection on the user and the phone as opposed to the platform.

    What does that matter ?  He was talking about a personal experience. His experience doesn't equate to "every" android user and neither does yours. There was no mention of the platform, just a single Android user. So I guess now I'm curious ... What are you defending exactly ?  
  • Reply 32 of 73
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,424member
    bilbo63 said:
    I sure hope Apple does not move to an iris scanner. That will make the user experience worse – not better.

    Touch ID works great and it's SEAMLESS, it unlocks pretty much instantly as we wake up our device. It's secure, dead easy and we needn't take any extra steps or do anything differently. Holding my phone to my eye for authorization is an additional and unnecessary step. Furthermore I can see that being an issue if you wear glasses and there is a glare on them. Stupid. Stupid. Stupid. I hope the whole iris scanner rumour was nothing but a smokescreen to get Samsung chasing their tails again.
    I'd be okay with it.  It's the next step in an even more secure method of authentication.  We leave our fingerprints everywhere and that can be used against us if someone really wants to make the effort to duplicate.  It's feasible, albeit minor for 99.999% of the population.  We're simply not important enough.

    If anyone can do it right, without it being obtrusive and obvious, it will be Apple.  I'm looking forward to seeing their implementation of it. 
  • Reply 33 of 73
    anomeanome Posts: 1,242member

    I wonder if it will be as easy to defeat as the facial recognition used to be - just show it a photo of the person (or their iris) and it works.

    Seriously, as a primary security measure, I don't think iris scans are as secure as fingerprint readers, but as I've said elsewhere, in terms of usability for people with certain types of muscular or joint problems it could be beneficial.

  • Reply 34 of 73
    igorskyigorsky Posts: 422member
    igorsky said:
    Apple Pay has worked 100% of the time for me at any pos reader that has supported it.
    Congratulations! It doesn't for others. Not saying it's a wide spread problem, it isn't, but it doesn't work 100% for everyone. 

    Thanks!

    I'll say in the instances where Apple Pay acted up, it has always been because I moved the phone away from the reader too fast before the transaction was completed.  So my mistakes are your gain...you're welcome  ;)
  • Reply 35 of 73
    xmhillxxmhillx Posts: 108member
    maestro64 said:
    maestro64 said:
    Curious. I have seen plenty of Android users have absolutely no problem with Android Pay, and none with Google Wallet before then. It may have been a reflection on the user and the phone as opposed to the platform.


    The process went something like this, pull the phone out, turn it on, unlock the phone, then proceed to find the correct app, then sorting through the app to find the correct loyalty card, hand it to cashier which had no idea what he was trying to do, tried scanning it with barcode laser scanner then realize that will not work, so used the hand held photo scan to read the bar code on the phone screen. Hands the phone back to the person, they put the phone back in the pocket. Cashier complete transaction, person pull phone out of pocket, turns it on, unlook the phone again locate payment app, (not sure if they were using a Samsung or what it had a case so I could not tell) then proceed to get the reader to read the phone.

    Me on the other hand, turn on phone it open to apple wallet, can pulled up loyal card hand it to cashier (this time the cashier knew exactly what to do, thanks to the guy in front of me) gave me back the phone, put it in my pocket, cashier completes transaction, I double click the home button on the watch and paid with my credit card. Done no drama.

    I agree most of it has to do with the user, but that has been my experience most Android users really do not know how to use these apps and they do not work all that seamlessly.

    Hey, there's a shortcut to opening Apple Wallet.

    When you pull your phone out of your pocket (meaning it's asleep, unlocked, screen is off), double click the home button and Wallet comes up. Make sure it's enabled within Setting > Wallet & Apple Pay > Double Click Home Button.

    This is different from hovering the phone over an NFC terminal to activate Wallet. Why? Because Wallet disappears and the screen turns off when you move the phone away from the terminal; which isn't good if you want to pull up your loyalty card to hand it to the cashier.
    Double clicking the home button keeps Wallet on while you pull up your loyalty card; it's (almost) the same as getting into the phone and opening the app. I say "almost" because Double Click Home Button strictly brings up cards only (credit cards, loyalty cards, etc). Opening the Wallet app from within the phone brings up Passes (iTunes, Flight Boarding Passes, etc) in addition to the cards, and also brightens up the screen full blast. It's a little nuance, but still different.

    Not sure if you knew that, but I didn't think so when I interpreted "Me on the other hand, turn on phone it opens to apple wallet...".
  • Reply 36 of 73
    jakebjakeb Posts: 557member
    apple ][ said:
    Funny, I've now seen people do the same with Apple Pay. I then show them how to do it correctly for next time. Even then, sometimes Apple Pay just doesn't work when I've used it at the same pos the day before. Nothing is perfect. Not even Apple pay.
    Can you believe that I have never used Apple Pay yet, not even once?

    Maybe I'll be the guy who makes a dumbass out of themselves, when trying to use it for the first time. :#

    I do have a few cards registered with Apple Pay, but the stores that I frequent most often, like my neighborhood grocery store, does not do Apple Pay I believe.

    Maybe I'll try it just for fun, the next time I happen to walk by a McDonalds or something.

    I can imagine people with the first credit cards felt weird too. I felt very awkward with the whole thing until recently. Now I pay with my watch even like it's no big deal. 


    I think the transition to chip and signature in the US will drive people to try it out. For some reason, paying with the chip is crazy slow. 
  • Reply 37 of 73
    waltgwaltg Posts: 87member
    While I have all apple equipment, and of course stock,,, what I see is Apple falling seriously behind on their phone releases.. Silly things like when should I go to sleep based on when I woke up! Give me a break, silly sh**. In fairness, compare the new galaxies against the now aging iPhone, if your honest, the reaction would be, 'what's apple doing,sleeping, no wonder they are loosing high end market share! Come on Apple, the rumor mill says but wait till next year,,, then next year you will be trying to catch back up! Hum,,, those making fun of the iris scanning capabilities here,,, what were you saying a week or so ago when the rumor mill was building up Apple "MAY" come out with this in a few years???? Being from a manufacturing background and in IT, what I truly see is Apple lagging behind and being left in the dust on this equipment! I'm sure all the fanboys will be working their fingers hard at rebuking and picking this post apart, but this is what I and a lot of the others are seeing happening currently....
  • Reply 38 of 73
    jupiteronejupiterone Posts: 1,564member
    While not yet fully implemented in the operating system, .....
    That's all anyone needs to know.....
  • Reply 39 of 73
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    sflocal said:
    bilbo63 said:
    I sure hope Apple does not move to an iris scanner. That will make the user experience worse – not better.

    Touch ID works great and it's SEAMLESS, it unlocks pretty much instantly as we wake up our device. It's secure, dead easy and we needn't take any extra steps or do anything differently. Holding my phone to my eye for authorization is an additional and unnecessary step. Furthermore I can see that being an issue if you wear glasses and there is a glare on them. Stupid. Stupid. Stupid. I hope the whole iris scanner rumour was nothing but a smokescreen to get Samsung chasing their tails again.
    I'd be okay with it.  It's the next step in an even more secure method of authentication.  We leave our fingerprints everywhere and that can be used against us if someone really wants to make the effort to duplicate.  It's feasible, albeit minor for 99.999% of the population.  We're simply not important enough.

    If anyone can do it right, without it being obtrusive and obvious, it will be Apple.  I'm looking forward to seeing their implementation of it. 
    I doubt the fingerprint left on any surface is good enough to unlock iPhone. 
    netmage
  • Reply 40 of 73
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    iPhone 6S Plus screen is wider than Galaxy N7.  N7 screen is stretched.  It is less useful with a stretched screen.  
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