U.S. urges Samsung Galaxy Note 7 owners to stop use, return after 26 burned, 55 property damage fir

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 40
    kenc said:
    So, doesn't that mean they only sold 2.5M Galaxy N7 in 2 weeks of being on the market, Aug 19 to Sep 2nd? Isn't that like paltry?

    Apple probably has that many iPhone 7 Plus' backordered per day!
    caliapplepieguywatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 40
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member

    Now, now, let's not get nasty. We all know how karma works. Samsung still makes great products and this could've happened to anybody, including the almighty Apple. Oh my, can you just imagine the PR on this if it were Apple? Samsung is still a major parts supplier for Apple, correct? So let's not bash Samsung. I don't like the Android OS in any way, but have you seen the Samsung OLED displays and the amazing color on them lately? Wow, what vivid colors! And the cameras take amazing photos. Buuuut....I still can't wait for my black iPhone 7 Plus to arrive (next) Friday
    Whatever. 

    I guess this is what happens when you pack your phone with features to score spec points with little regard as to how safe and useful they'd be in real life. This is why Samsung keeps updating the screen beyond the point where anyone except Clark Kent can see the dots, and adds an iris scanner that warns you not to look at it too long because it might damage your eyes.

    The problem with this whole burning phone fiasco is not the fact it happened, it's how Samsung is handling it. 

    What did Apple do when they heard that someone had been killed using a faulty unapproved third party cable while charging an iPhone? They investigated and decided the best thing to do for their reputation and the safety of their customers was offer a discounted genuine lightning cable in return for a potentially dangerous one. That is how you go about protecting your reputation.

    http://www.phonearena.com/news/Apple-announces-plan-to-swap-third-party-power-adapters-for-discounted-Apple-manufactured-chargers_id46088

    Samsung's response to this has been slow and mealy-mouthed – to such an extent that US Regulators have had to step in.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37381531

    "Because this product presents such a serious fire hazard, I am urging all consumers... to take advantage of this recall right away,'' Elliot Kaye, chairman of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission said.
    Mr Kaye said Samsung should not have tried to do the recall by itself, saying: "Anybody who thinks that a company going out on its own is going to provide the best recall for that company, and more importantly for the consumer, needs to have more than their phone checked,"


    chiacalijony0
  • Reply 23 of 40
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    A snapshot of Internet comments posted to Consumer Reports indicates that many people who have a Galaxy Note 7 phone don't understand the risk involved, while others are offering their personal opinions, claiming that most phones probably aren't defective and that nothing really needs to be done about it. 

    Amazing. Even Cnocbui isn’t trying to defend this.

    What the anti-Apple crowd doesn't realise is that the sooner this is resolved, the sooner Samsung can move on. Advising people to play Russian Roulette with their health is not the best idea in my opinion.
    chiacalijony0
  • Reply 24 of 40
    calicali Posts: 3,494member
    #bombgate

    I was watching the news today and they covered this #bombgate story using the phrase "Samsung phones" along with warnings. Immediately after the screen flashed to iPhone 7 and the reporter announced "iPhone 7 releases tomorrow and is experiencing incredible demand".

    Man was I happy.

    Also When I read the headline and author of this article I literally yelled "yes!" In a quiet room of strangers. Admittedly this is a soft piece by DED and I'm disappointed. 
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 25 of 40
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    apple ][ said:
    I saw on the news last night, that the Galaxy 7 has now been banned on busses and subways in my city.

    I will keep my eyes open, and if I see anybody using a Galaxy 7 the next time that I am on public transportation, I will report them to the authorities. 

    Fandroids watch out!
    Why would you report them? I just don't understand this meddlesome behavior, we are talking less than 100 phones going up in smoke so far. I have never had a desire to buy an Android device but I really can't support harassing people that decide to own such devices.
  • Reply 26 of 40
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,137member
    RealGate™
  • Reply 27 of 40
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Now, now, let's not get nasty. We all know how karma works. Samsung still makes great products and this could've happened to anybody, including the almighty Apple. Oh my, can you just imagine the PR on this if it were Apple? Samsung is still a major parts supplier for Apple, correct? So let's not bash Samsung. I don't like the Android OS in any way, but have you seen the Samsung OLED displays and the amazing color on them lately? Wow, what vivid colors! And the cameras take amazing photos. Buuuut....I still can't wait for my black iPhone 7 Plus to arrive (next) Friday
    It has happened to a number of manufactures in different industries, including aircraft. There is always a risk with batteries and the charging techniques used with them. Apple has in fact had a few phones go up in flames due to battery thermal run away.   It isn't a question if could it happen to Apple, it has happened just not to the extent Samsung is suffering right now.   

    You our are right of course with respect to the Samsung bashing.   Too many people expect a company to have an instant grip on what a root cause is.   There are many possibilities that could result in these battery failures.   It will take awhile to completely understand the problem.  
    singularity
  • Reply 28 of 40
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,137member
    The sad thing is that Samsung will probably not destroy the phones but ship them to 2nd and 3rd world countries.  That would be consistent with their unscrupulous behavior manifested in the past.
    applepieguySpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 40
    chia said:
    but have you seen the Samsung OLED displays and the amazing color on them lately? Wow, what vivid colors

    There are  least 92 people in the US who've seen just how vivid and amazing the color of flames their Samsung can display.
    Laughed so hard I almost woke up the baby.
    SpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 40
    It's like a scaled-down version of global warming...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 40
    I wouldn't worry about it.  B)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 40
    apple ][ said:
    I saw on the news last night, that the Galaxy 7 has now been banned on busses and subways in my city.

    I will keep my eyes open, and if I see anybody using a Galaxy 7 the next time that I am on public transportation, I will report them to the authorities. 

    Fandroids watch out! :#
    What a silly thing to say. I just received a replacement for my Galaxy Note 7 and it looks identical to the recalled one. Can you tell the difference between a phone with a defective battery and one without?
  • Reply 33 of 40
    perkedel said:
    It sure is quiet in android forums, no outrage about this as the audio jack; it is as if nobody owns this model.
    You aren't really looking, there is a tremendous amount of discussion about this issue. Every tech blogger is talking about it, the XDA Developer forums have thousands of discussions. And it goes beyond the Note 7, people are upset about how both Samsung and the carriers are handling this issue. It's going to have a lasting negative affect on Samsung and their phones. http://www.androidauthority.com/samsung-perception-problem-bigger-note-7-716362/
  • Reply 34 of 40
    This seems like it's going to be a logistical nightmare. How many rectangular Notes will have to be examined? And how will the "safe" Notes be distinguished from the "unsafe" ones? Feels like I'm going to side-eye anyone with a recent Note.
    All are being recalled, and anyone that doesn't send theirs in is a fool. There's no way of knowing if your unit is defective or not, it isn't worth the risk. Samsung was very good about replacing my Galaxy Note 7. Their Canada website had good info about replacing the phone. Received my replacement yesterday and I've got everything transferred from the old phone. But visually, there is no difference than the old one so that people can see that it has a safe battery.
  • Reply 35 of 40
    gilly017 said:
    Good ole Sammy not coming clean. Giving 'conflicting information' about what's happening with their product. This company is truly sad and has no conscience whatsoever. 
    Samsung was pretty good (in Canada) about communicating about the issue and getting a replacement. The carriers are a different matter, they've been absolutely clueless about the issue and recall.
  • Reply 36 of 40
    Fandroid :
    people who are not equipped to make basic life decisions on their own.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 37 of 40
    dkimak said:
    This seems like it's going to be a logistical nightmare. How many rectangular Notes will have to be examined? And how will the "safe" Notes be distinguished from the "unsafe" ones? Feels like I'm going to side-eye anyone with a recent Note.
    All are being recalled, and anyone that doesn't send theirs in is a fool. There's no way of knowing if your unit is defective or not, it isn't worth the risk. Samsung was very good about replacing my Galaxy Note 7. Their Canada website had good info about replacing the phone. Received my replacement yesterday and I've got everything transferred from the old phone. But visually, there is no difference than the old one so that people can see that it has a safe battery.
    Are you referring to the Note 7 itself, or the packaging ?

    Wasn't the packaging supposed to have an "S" sticker on it as the distinctive marking ?


  • Reply 38 of 40
    uroshnor said:
    dkimak said:
    This seems like it's going to be a logistical nightmare. How many rectangular Notes will have to be examined? And how will the "safe" Notes be distinguished from the "unsafe" ones? Feels like I'm going to side-eye anyone with a recent Note.
    All are being recalled, and anyone that doesn't send theirs in is a fool. There's no way of knowing if your unit is defective or not, it isn't worth the risk. Samsung was very good about replacing my Galaxy Note 7. Their Canada website had good info about replacing the phone. Received my replacement yesterday and I've got everything transferred from the old phone. But visually, there is no difference than the old one so that people can see that it has a safe battery.
    Are you referring to the Note 7 itself, or the packaging ?

    Wasn't the packaging supposed to have an "S" sticker on it as the distinctive marking ?


    The packaging for the replacement phones has a small black square 'dot' on the label.  I believe the 'S' sticker is only in Korea, there wasn't one on my box.

    There are no markings on the replacement Note 7 to differentiate it from the ones that were recalled.
  • Reply 39 of 40
    dkimak said:
    apple ][ said:
    I saw on the news last night, that the Galaxy 7 has now been banned on busses and subways in my city.

    I will keep my eyes open, and if I see anybody using a Galaxy 7 the next time that I am on public transportation, I will report them to the authorities. 

    Fandroids watch out! :#
    What a silly thing to say. I just received a replacement for my Galaxy Note 7 and it looks identical to the recalled one. Can you tell the difference between a phone with a defective battery and one without?
    If you can't tell the difference, there may not be one.

    Didn't we hear that the non-defective phones won't start shipping till Sep 27th. 

    So the one you have... :/
  • Reply 40 of 40
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,611member
    kenc said:
    So, doesn't that mean they only sold 2.5M Galaxy N7 in 2 weeks of being on the market, Aug 19 to Sep 2nd? Isn't that like paltry?
    Yes, that seems to be about right. Given that people are being hurt with this defect, I suppose the (relatively) low sales of it are a good thing. Unlike some people here, I wouldn't wish this sort of dangerous defect on any company, even one I don't hold in very high regard, and I hope that now that the governments of North America have stepped in, Samsung will step up its efforts to recall and replace the defective units. It's easy to criticize Samsung for what appears to be an imperfect response to this, but I'm not sure they had a good grip on the extent of the possible damage early on. I hope Apple and other companies are learning about this, as it could (possibly) happen to them someday as well.
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