Apple's iOS 10 now running on more devices than iOS 9

Posted:
in iPhone
Adoption of iOS 10 has surpassed the halfway mark in just two weeks of availability, as research shows more than 55 percent of compatible devices are running Apple's latest mobile operating system.









According to statistics compiled by research firm Mixpanel, iOS 10 adoption is tracking at 55.29 percent as of Friday, while iOS 9 stands at 43.8 percent. Older iOS version distribution fell to 4.71 percent.



The fresh metrics come two days after iOS 10 passed its predecessor for a majority share of compatible devices.



Bolstering Mixpanel's numbers, separate findings from AppLovin sees iOS 10 powering 55 percent of iPhones in the U.S., Recode reports.



As with any major Apple software release, consumer uptake of iOS 10 has been brisk. Initial figures from Mixpanel put adoption at 14 percent just 24 hours after it debuted earlier this month. A week later the tally showed moderate growth to one-third of compatible devices.



Apple has yet to announce official iOS 10 adoption numbers. The company traditionally posts regular updates on version distribution through a developer support webpage, though the resource has not been updated since Sept. 12, the day before iOS 10 launched.



Despite the gains, consumers are slower to migrate to iOS 10 than iOS 9, which last year reached the 50 percent mark in only four days.



Apple's iOS 10 offers users design enhancements and feature additions to Messages, Maps, Siri, Photos, Apple Music, News, and more. The free update is available now through the Software Update function in the iOS Settings app.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    I predicted a week, but twelve days isn't bad.
  • Reply 2 of 33
    That's quick. I'm on iOS 9 still. I'll upgrade over the weekend. 
  • Reply 3 of 33
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,256member
    Is there any comparable data on how quickly others adopted iOS in the past?
  • Reply 4 of 33
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,280member
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    dasanman69baconstang
  • Reply 5 of 33
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,179member
    dysamoria said:
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    As it should. Are you one of those "my ancient hardware and software are the best ever and everything after that is horrible" people that never plan to upgrade? iOS6 is ridiculously outdated and limited. 
    tycho24gilly33jude2012nolamacguylolliverjony0
  • Reply 6 of 33
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,256member
    slurpy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    As it should. Are you one of those "my ancient hardware and software are the best ever and everything after that is horrible" people that never plan to upgrade? iOS6 is ridiculously outdated and limited. 
    Older OSes also have the highest probably of being vulnerable to security flaws because of the increased time they've been available to hackers. 
    tycho24gilly33jude2012dasanman69nolamacguywatto_cobralolliverjony0
  • Reply 7 of 33
    I have an iPhone 6, and I wish I hadn't "updated." My battery life has gone down drastically, and sometimes the phone dies completely before even hitting the 20% warning, which never happened previously. With earlier operating systems, I usually finished the day with at least 80% left, but I think those days are gone for good. Also, often when making phone calls, I switch to the numeric keypad, but there is no tone when I press the numbers, so I can't select menu items from automated menus. All of this is happening with the latest version of the OS.

    I find the health app more convoluted and counterintuitive, to the point where I don't really use it anymore (whereas I did occasionally), but this may be different for watch users, and I think the design is at least intentional, unlike the other flaws I mentioned. 

    I can't really think of any advantages that outweigh these disadvantages.
    edited October 2016 dasanman69baconstang
  • Reply 8 of 33
    gilly33gilly33 Posts: 278member
    I have an iPhone 6, and I wish I hadn't "updated." My battery life has gone down drastically, and sometimes the phone dies completely before even hitting the 20% warning, which never happened previously. With earlier operating systems, I usually finished the day with at least 80% left, but I think those days are gone for good. Also, often when making phone calls, I switch to the numeric keypad, but there is no tone when I press the numbers, so I can't select menu items from automated menus. All of this is happening with the latest version of the OS.

    I find the health app more convoluted and counterintuitive, to the point where I don't really use it anymore (whereas I did occasionally), but this may be different for watch users, and I think the design is at least intentional, unlike the other flaws I mentioned. 

    I can't really think of any advantages that outweigh these disadvantages.
    Seems strange all this happening on an iPhone 6. My wife has an IP6 and no worries since the upgrade. Sorry about your woes. Maybe try reinstall. Like someone said the idiots attacking iOS with security breaches makes me want to keep up with the latest update. 
    tycho24watto_cobraAirunJaejony0
  • Reply 9 of 33
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    I have an iPhone 6, and I wish I hadn't "updated." My battery life has gone down drastically, and sometimes the phone dies completely before even hitting the 20% warning, which never happened previously. With earlier operating systems, I usually finished the day with at least 80% left, but I think those days are gone for good. Also, often when making phone calls, I switch to the numeric keypad, but there is no tone when I press the numbers, so I can't select menu items from automated menus. All of this is happening with the latest version of the OS.

    I find the health app more convoluted and counterintuitive, to the point where I don't really use it anymore (whereas I did occasionally), but this may be different for watch users, and I think the design is at least intentional, unlike the other flaws I mentioned. 

    I can't really think of any advantages that outweigh these disadvantages.
    Revert while you can then instead of whining.
    Funny how, others with 6 don't have this battery drain.
    Check your settings and also see what apps are using up the batteries; often resyncing, reindexing and redownloading is what kills the battery in the first few dayss.
    jude2012tycho24watto_cobrajbdragonbaconstanglolliverAirunJaejony0
  • Reply 10 of 33
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,229moderator
    Soli said:
    slurpy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    As it should. Are you one of those "my ancient hardware and software are the best ever and everything after that is horrible" people that never plan to upgrade? iOS6 is ridiculously outdated and limited. 
    Older OSes also have the highest probably of being vulnerable to security flaws because of the increased time they've been available to hackers. 
    Slightly older systems have also been tested and fixed more but the main reason for sticking to slightly older systems is to maintain stable working environments. You have to match development environments across different machines like iOS version in Xcode so when the phone is updated, it means updating Xcode (multi-GB download even though the SDK required is <100MB and the SDK still works on older Xcode versions so the full update is unnecessary) and they restrict the newer Xcode versions to the newer desktop OS so it means updating the desktop OS (which is again unnecessary as the SDKs work on older Xcode versions but you have to install them manually). 1-2 year old systems are the most stable and compatible (with 3rd party software) and still get security updates.

    There's no need to keep reminding people every single day; if the user declines, Apple should take it to mean the user has evaluated the decision and said no. It's bad user experience to keep asking users to do things they have explicitly declined, Microsoft has been doing this with Windows 10 updates. They can leave the notification icon on the settings icon and have a first reminder, then a followup reminder maybe 7 days later and after two explicit declines, do a monthly reminder or leave a message somewhere like in the App Store, system settings, notification panel.

    Another thing I've noticed in the newer systems is incorrect hitboxes. Sometimes pressing a location on screen activates elements it shouldn't. In the App Store for example:



    The icon below the battery icon is the wishlist. If you tap at the top of the Grossing button, it will activate the wishlist button. You can see in the second image, my finger isn't even close to the wishlist button so clearly my intention was not to activate it, it is in fact full on pressing the Grossing button and if there's any contact at all with the screen above the Grossing button, it's minimal. The OS should be activating buttons based on where the finger is most in contact with the screen and hitboxes shouldn't be extending far beyond the visible icon. The wishlist hitbox extends all the way to the bluetooth icon as you can see from the horizontal position of the finger. Hitboxes have to be larger for touch input but not so large that they produce unintended actions.

    This applies to the update notifications because the 'Later' button is put in the middle, where hitting the 'Install Now' button is easier to hit accidentally, especially if it's shown frequently:



    I think it's generally a good idea to push people (especially casual users) onto newer systems but like I say, when you need a stable production environment, the constant reminders are unnecessary and an accidental install is hard to revert back again. Right now iOS 9 is stable and secure, as is El Capitan. iOS 10 and Sierra just came out. It's not good sticking to extremely old systems on hardware that can support newer ones but it's not always better to be on systems that just came out. One reason people get stuck on much older systems is Apple pulling the downloads for previous systems as soon as the new one arrives. Someone might be willing to update to El Capitan or iOS 9 just now knowing they are stable but they only have the option to go to the latest systems. I think it would be good of them to offer both the last system and the current one as options for updating an old system with the latest being the default selection and the last one for people who prefer the stability and compatibility of systems that have been available for at least a year.
    singularitybaconstangdysamoriaAirunJae
  • Reply 11 of 33
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,762member
    I have an iPhone 6, and I wish I hadn't "updated." My battery life has gone down drastically, and sometimes the phone dies completely before even hitting the 20% warning, which never happened previously. With earlier operating systems, I usually finished the day with at least 80% left, but I think those days are gone for good. Also, often when making phone calls, I switch to the numeric keypad, but there is no tone when I press the numbers, so I can't select menu items from automated menus. All of this is happening with the latest version of the OS.

    I find the health app more convoluted and counterintuitive, to the point where I don't really use it anymore (whereas I did occasionally), but this may be different for watch users, and I think the design is at least intentional, unlike the other flaws I mentioned. 

    I can't really think of any advantages that outweigh these disadvantages.
    Chances are that this is caused by a recently updated app that is using more power than it should. 

    Upgraded a few weeks ago and found battery life pretty much the same. 
    jbdragonlolliver
  • Reply 12 of 33
    Headline is misleading. iOS10 is running on more than half of *compatible devices*, but most likely NOT half of all iPhones/iPads still in use.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 13 of 33
    Hmmm...iOS10 55.29% + iOS9 43.8% + other iOS 4.71% = 103.8%. Why does this not add up?
    baconstang
  • Reply 14 of 33
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,256member
    dawnheady said:
    Hmmm...iOS10 55.29% + iOS9 43.8% + other iOS 4.71% = 103.8%. Why does this not add up?
    Either the math is wrong, or they took the percentage of every other iOS version, including, say, the percentage for 9.0, 9.0.1. 9.0.2, 9.1, 9.2, 9.2.1, 9.3, 9.3.1, 9.3.2, and 9.3.3, which may explain how they could get that far over 100%. Now imagine this for having lumped in every point release for all major iOS versions below 9.0. Regardless, it's not good reporting without a better explaination.
    edited October 2016 dysamoria
  • Reply 15 of 33
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,256member
    urungus said:
    Headline is misleading. iOS10 is running on more than half of *compatible devices*, but most likely NOT half of all iPhones/iPads still in use.
    It sounds fine to me. All they state in the headline is that the percentage is higher than iOS 9.x, which I think is the best way to present the data.
  • Reply 16 of 33
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,256member
    Marvin said:
    Soli said:
    slurpy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    As it should. Are you one of those "my ancient hardware and software are the best ever and everything after that is horrible" people that never plan to upgrade? iOS6 is ridiculously outdated and limited. 
    Older OSes also have the highest probably of being vulnerable to security flaws because of the increased time they've been available to hackers. 
    Slightly older systems have also been tested and fixed more but the main reason for sticking to slightly older systems is to maintain stable working environments.
    No argument here.

    There's no need to keep reminding people every single day; if the user declines, Apple should take it to mean the user has evaluated the decision and said no.

    It's annoying with Apps want you to rate them and it's annoying when Apple keeps asking you to update. If you're on a device controlled by your work I seem to recall that can be disabled from the control end, but for the the multitude of normal devices that need to remain stable for their work environment, I don't think there's an option.

    edit: Once you start getting the notifications, it may be possible to stop them.

    Yes there is a way to disable it. First let me explain why you are getting that notification. Even if you have automatic updates turned off, the new IOS update still downloads to your phone and iPad. It is already in your phone and iPad right now waiting for you to completely install it. It is not installed but it is sitting there in your phone and iPad waiting for you to click on it to install. So what you must do is the following:

     TLDR - Go to General > Storage & iCloud Usage > Manage Storage (under Storage) > Select the update item (should have the settings icon and named iOS 9.x.x) > Delete Update
    Click on the Setting icon. Then click on General. click on Storage & iCloud usage. It might just say Storage on your device. When the next page pops up you will see at the top the word Storage. Under it you will see Manage Storage. Click on it and wait till the list is fully populated. Depending on how many apps you have this can take a couple of seconds to about half a minute. Look through this list till you see the new iOS update. Delete it. Then your pop up notice should go away. Don't worry about loosing the update. You can always get it later in the future. If in the future you get the pop up again, then that means Apple has again downloaded it to your phone or iPad without your permission. Simply do the above all over again to delete it and get rid of the new pop up. This is the only way to get rid of the pop up without installing it.
    http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/209498/is-there-a-way-to-turn-off-ios-9-update-reminders

    I don't see why iOS wouldn't just download the update again and then start nagging you about it, but if that works that's at least a work around for something that should be a setting.

    edited October 2016 baconstangdysamoria
  • Reply 17 of 33
    bsenkabsenka Posts: 799member
    slurpy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    As it should. Are you one of those "my ancient hardware and software are the best ever and everything after that is horrible" people that never plan to upgrade? iOS6 is ridiculously outdated and limited. 
     I'd never say "everything new is horrible", but iOS 6 was definitely a better user experience for me. I wish I could instal it on my 6-plus.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 18 of 33
    I lost the ability to use Launcher to access Settings, like Location and Cellular.

    Have I known that, I don't know I would have updated my 6+ just to get some cute Messages effects...
    baconstang
  • Reply 19 of 33
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Marvin said:
    Soli said:
    slurpy said:
    dysamoria said:
    Because it nags you to update. Who wouldn't get sick of that after a while?? I'm glad my iPhone 4 with iOS 6.x doesn't nag me for iOS 7 (it just wastes 4GB of storage).
    As it should. Are you one of those "my ancient hardware and software are the best ever and everything after that is horrible" people that never plan to upgrade? iOS6 is ridiculously outdated and limited. 
    Older OSes also have the highest probably of being vulnerable to security flaws because of the increased time they've been available to hackers. 
    Slightly older systems have also been tested and fixed more but the main reason for sticking to slightly older systems is to maintain stable working environments. You have to match development environments across different machines like iOS version in Xcode so when the phone is updated, it means updating Xcode (multi-GB download even though the SDK required is <100MB and the SDK still works on older Xcode versions so the full update is unnecessary) and they restrict the newer Xcode versions to the newer desktop OS so it means updating the desktop OS (which is again unnecessary as the SDKs work on older Xcode versions but you have to install them manually). 1-2 year old systems are the most stable and compatible (with 3rd party software) and still get security updates.

    There's no need to keep reminding people every single day; if the user declines, Apple should take it to mean the user has evaluated the decision and said no. It's bad user experience to keep asking users to do things they have explicitly declined, Microsoft has been doing this with Windows 10 updates. They can leave the notification icon on the settings icon and have a first reminder, then a followup reminder maybe 7 days later and after two explicit declines, do a monthly reminder or leave a message somewhere like in the App Store, system settings, notification panel.

    Another thing I've noticed in the newer systems is incorrect hitboxes. Sometimes pressing a location on screen activates elements it shouldn't. In the App Store for example:



    The icon below the battery icon is the wishlist. If you tap at the top of the Grossing button, it will activate the wishlist button. You can see in the second image, my finger isn't even close to the wishlist button so clearly my intention was not to activate it, it is in fact full on pressing the Grossing button and if there's any contact at all with the screen above the Grossing button, it's minimal. The OS should be activating buttons based on where the finger is most in contact with the screen and hitboxes shouldn't be extending far beyond the visible icon. The wishlist hitbox extends all the way to the bluetooth icon as you can see from the horizontal position of the finger. Hitboxes have to be larger for touch input but not so large that they produce unintended actions.

    This applies to the update notifications because the 'Later' button is put in the middle, where hitting the 'Install Now' button is easier to hit accidentally, especially if it's shown frequently:



    I think it's generally a good idea to push people (especially casual users) onto newer systems but like I say, when you need a stable production environment, the constant reminders are unnecessary and an accidental install is hard to revert back again. Right now iOS 9 is stable and secure, as is El Capitan. iOS 10 and Sierra just came out. It's not good sticking to extremely old systems on hardware that can support newer ones but it's not always better to be on systems that just came out. One reason people get stuck on much older systems is Apple pulling the downloads for previous systems as soon as the new one arrives. Someone might be willing to update to El Capitan or iOS 9 just now knowing they are stable but they only have the option to go to the latest systems. I think it would be good of them to offer both the last system and the current one as options for updating an old system with the latest being the default selection and the last one for people who prefer the stability and compatibility of systems that have been available for at least a year.
    The reason for not allowing reversion is preventing this being used as a means to go around bug fixes for security issues
    lolliver
  • Reply 20 of 33
    rx4spamrx4spam Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Why is there so little love, (outright derision and hostility even), for people whom, for whatever reason, would prefer to keep an older OS running on their device?
    I typically do not like to update the OS's on my devices, whether they be iOS or OS X, -er, excuse me MacOS,  until a couple of updates have been issued.
    This is both, because I am waiting to hear from different online communities running older no longer supported apps, (e.g. Final Cut Pro 7 on MacOS), about potential incompatibilities, as well as to give time for the folks at Cupertino to clear out any bugs which are naturally present, (both iOS and MacOS), in the first couple iterations of any new software.
    Apple loves to make a big deal reporting the percentage of devices updated to their latest OS, -like it's some badge of pride.
    Well, considering the drip-drip-drip, Chinese water torture, that one has to endure in order to resist the updates, (you'd think the nagware popups were written by the Borg), the reverse side of that story is the real news, -and that is what percentage of holdouts are still able to hang in there out there?
    Concerning iOS, -considering that Apple forces the download of the update onto your phone without implicit consent, and then nags you every single day, asking you to install that update that you didn't allow in the first place, without giving you any solution whatsoever to stop this from happening, -the fact that 45% of the people have still managed to resist this, and any forced update is the real story, and, not how many have actually succumbed to updating their devices, whether by choice or submission.
    Granted, these updates may enhance the user experience, and provide a more secure environment, but that decision, and choice, should still be ours, and not theirs. Giving us a simple preference setting would easily do the trick, but that is clearly not in their interest, only in ours.
    All this said, I have never read any of the Apple agreements that we have to keep giving our consent to from time to time, in order to run their products.
    So for all I know, I may have already given them every right to engage in this old-school, Microsoft like behavior.
    Finally, I have been an Apple user for over twenty seven years.  I sure do miss that old company...  :'(

    singularitybaconstangdysamoria
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