IBM deploying 1,300 Macs per week, Apple users need much less support than PC counterparts

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 48
    geekmeegeekmee Posts: 313member
    I know...Let's not get ahead ourselves. But I have been a corporate windows app trainer for end users for over 20 years. There are two things that have consistent: 1.) Users remain ambivalent and clueless about the OS 2.) Users consistently hate the No Help support experience.
  • Reply 22 of 48
    I work for a very large tech company that has been allowing and supporting Macs for a while now. One of the biggest changes I have seen personally is how responsive IT is becoming for Mac support. They are already officially supporting Sierra. That means that they have tested all of our internal solutions are working fine or with acceptable caveats. They start with the betas and work with vendors on found issues, etc. Hard for me to believe they got it done this fast. I have never seen them move that fast to a new Windows release.
    lolliverpscooter63baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 48
    GusMplsGusMpls Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    brucemc said:
    Great hard data on support costs.

    Interested to know if any data comes out regarding user experience / satisfaction.
    This was also discussed in Mr. Previn's presentation. Much higher csat for Mac users. The presentation should be available at Jamf's web site next week some time.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 24 of 48
    Worth considering that the macs are all new, while the thinkpads will all be a few years old so it's not that surprising there is a difference

    They showed comparisons between the Lenovo T460 and Lenovo X1 Yoga vs MacBook and MacBook Pro. Those Lenovos are not a few years old. The T460 was launched in Feb 2016.

    So much for your theory.
    Do you have a source for that? I couldn't find anything online and the infographic just says "PC"
  • Reply 25 of 48
    wood1208 said:
    Color me impressed.  I figured the IBM thing wouldn't have legs.  Nice job, Tim and Co.
    When IBM decides to do something it does and it will give big boost to MacOS in enterpeise. I know, because I worked their.
    One unexpected side effect of the move from Windows to OSX/MacOS is that IBM is planning to or actually releasing more of their Enterpise level software on the Apple OS.
    One dev team leader I know told me that almost 50% of his Dev team are using Apple kit now and many of them are testing the forthcoming MacOS Client release.
    The Apple branch of this product went out of service around 2004. It is nice to know that Apple is getting some love from IBM these days.
    All we need are the servers that can run OSX/MacOS.

    It is nice to know that Apple is getting some love from IBM these days.
    All we need are the servers that can run OSX/MacOS.

    Mmm...  

    Apple introduced the A7 64-bit ARM chip 3 years ago.  Thinking out loud here, but what if Apple has been developing and testing  64-bit ARM Server SOCs in the last 3+ years?  

    Could they be ready to internally deploy [let's call it] the A10s internally to Apple server farms?  (Aside: Maybe they've been deploying them all along -- resulting in occasional disruptions to Apple's cloud offerings).

    Could they be ready to market it to SMBs?

    Could they be ready to market it to others, like IBM, as a general purpose server offering?


    Crazy?  

    Look at this from 2013 comparing a Calxeda cluster of 24 32-bit ARM SOCs against Intel Xeon chips.  It's a long article, but worth reading:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6757/calxedas-arm-server-tested

    Lots of charts, here's a few:




    FWIW, Calxeda bit the dust in December 2013 -- because it could not find additional funding.  Both Google and Amazon hired former Calxeda employees.


    And this:

    Foxconn, ARM, and AtGames buy Calxeda assets

    Updated 2x: Better yet they will continue on with the roadmap

    Dec 22, 2014 by Charlie Demerjian
     
    Calxeda Logo
    In news that will send shivers up the spine of many in the server world, a group that includes Foxconn just bought Calxeda’s assets. More interestingly this consortium that also includes ARM and AtGames Cloud Holdings will keep going with their products.
    edited October 2016 tmay
  • Reply 26 of 48
    brost84brost84 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    Here is the link to the video that covers all of the IBM information. While the video is an hour and a half long the IBM information is in the first hour.
  • Reply 27 of 48
    When our organization first started letting users get Macs, albeit reluctantly, they had zero tech support for Mac users. We got by just fine.
    lolliverwilliamlondondysamoriapscooter63baconstangwatto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 48
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,594member
    I'd love to walk through an all Mac office landscape. Just once.  It would be very refreshing. 
    baconstangwatto_cobrawilliamlondon
  • Reply 29 of 48
    spodspod Posts: 25member
    In 1981 Apple posted the ad "Welcome IBM. Seriously" when they released the IBM PC to compete with the Apple II and it didn't end up too good for Apple in the end.  Decades later Apple should post a new ad "You're welcome IBM. ROTFL"
    brakkenwatto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 48
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,042member
    I still remember how my IT department peers were utter jackasses about Macs... I wonder if any of them have grown up yet and what they think of this kind of news. Admittedly, the Mac has become way more tech-oriented under the surface, but the user experience has not changed significantly since then. Simpler is smarter, not "dumbed down".
    baconstangbrakkenwatto_cobrawilliamlondon
  • Reply 31 of 48
    macOS:  Breaking Windows
    pscooter63
  • Reply 32 of 48
    wood1208 said:
    Color me impressed.  I figured the IBM thing wouldn't have legs.  Nice job, Tim and Co.
    When IBM decides to do something it does and it will give big boost to MacOS in enterpeise. I know, because I worked their.
    One unexpected side effect of the move from Windows to OSX/MacOS is that IBM is planning to or actually releasing more of their Enterpise level software on the Apple OS.
    One dev team leader I know told me that almost 50% of his Dev team are using Apple kit now and many of them are testing the forthcoming MacOS Client release.
    The Apple branch of this product went out of service around 2004. It is nice to know that Apple is getting some love from IBM these days.
    All we need are the servers that can run OSX/MacOS.

    It is nice to know that Apple is getting some love from IBM these days.
    All we need are the servers that can run OSX/MacOS.

    Mmm...  

    Apple introduced the A7 64-bit ARM chip 3 years ago.  Thinking out loud here, but what if Apple has been developing and testing  64-bit ARM Server SOCs in the last 3+ years?  

    Could they be ready to internally deploy [let's call it] the A10s internally to Apple server farms?  (Aside: Maybe they've been deploying them all along -- resulting in occasional disruptions to Apple's cloud offerings).

    Could they be ready to market it to SMBs?

    Could they be ready to market it to others, like IBM, as a general purpose server offering?


    Crazy?  

    Look at this from 2013 comparing a Calxeda cluster of 24 32-bit ARM SOCs against Intel Xeon chips.  It's a long article, but worth reading:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6757/calxedas-arm-server-tested

    Lots of charts, here's a few:




    FWIW, Calxeda bit the dust in December 2013 -- because it could not find additional funding.  Both Google and Amazon hired former Calxeda employees.


    And this:

    Foxconn, ARM, and AtGames buy Calxeda assets

    Updated 2x: Better yet they will continue on with the roadmap

    Dec 22, 2014 by Charlie Demerjian
     
    Calxeda Logo
    In news that will send shivers up the spine of many in the server world, a group that includes Foxconn just bought Calxeda’s assets. More interestingly this consortium that also includes ARM and AtGames Cloud Holdings will keep going with their products.
    This is all quite interesting...

    Every time I hear about Macs in the enterprise, or when people say Apple is more focussed on consumers and not interested in enterprise, I wonder how Apple handles their own internal enterprise needs. Obviously, one of the largest tech companies on the planet would know a thing or two about enterprise, so it was always a bit perplexing to me that Apple would not have more products to offer in this regard.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 48
    ksecksec Posts: 1,554member
    I am actually interested in how many manage those. From Update to provisioning. Apple has been lacking software in this department from both macOS and iOS devices. From SME to Enterprise. Or correct me if I am wrong.
  • Reply 34 of 48
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • Reply 35 of 48
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 36 of 48
    dklebedev said:
    sog35 said:
    The business market is ripe for an iOS Desktop

    A10X 
    128 GB Flash
    Keyboard/Mouse 
    $299

    256 GB Flash $349
    512 GB Flash $399

    Wouldn't that require Apple to build mouse support for iOS?
    This would be so easy for them to resolve. They would start with tvOS (which is a non-touch iOS variant) and implement not a mouse (that's silly) but rather a TouchPad to continue the "touch" paradigm on a non-touch iOS screen. It could operate like this, when you touch the TouchPad an area of the screen displays a small area the size of the end of your finger by defocusing the area to represent where you are "touching" on the screen. When you picked your finger up off the TouchPad the "cursor" would disappear. This would easily retain the touch paradigm of iOS without ruining the "touch based" iOS experience. If you move to an entry box, the cursors changes (as it does in tvOS), if you click something, it'll select whatever it's supposed to select, and on and on. You could select tools and use the TouchPad to navigate, they could really do an elegant job of it. tvOS uses a small touchpad on the remote, so Apple is already quite a way there, they just need to extend it a bit. It could work, if they do it I hope they go that way rather than introduce an ugly mouse and pointer to what is quite an elegant and simple OS.
  • Reply 37 of 48
    wood1208 said:
    Color me impressed.  I figured the IBM thing wouldn't have legs.  Nice job, Tim and Co.
    When IBM decides to do something it does and it will give big boost to MacOS in enterpeise. I know, because I worked their.
    One unexpected side effect of the move from Windows to OSX/MacOS is that IBM is planning to or actually releasing more of their Enterpise level software on the Apple OS.
    One dev team leader I know told me that almost 50% of his Dev team are using Apple kit now and many of them are testing the forthcoming MacOS Client release.
    The Apple branch of this product went out of service around 2004. It is nice to know that Apple is getting some love from IBM these days.
    All we need are the servers that can run OSX/MacOS.

    It is nice to know that Apple is getting some love from IBM these days.
    All we need are the servers that can run OSX/MacOS.

    Mmm...  

    Apple introduced the A7 64-bit ARM chip 3 years ago.  Thinking out loud here, but what if Apple has been developing and testing  64-bit ARM Server SOCs in the last 3+ years?  

    Could they be ready to internally deploy [let's call it] the A10s internally to Apple server farms?  (Aside: Maybe they've been deploying them all along -- resulting in occasional disruptions to Apple's cloud offerings).

    Could they be ready to market it to SMBs?

    Could they be ready to market it to others, like IBM, as a general purpose server offering?


    Crazy?  

    Look at this from 2013 comparing a Calxeda cluster of 24 32-bit ARM SOCs against Intel Xeon chips.  It's a long article, but worth reading:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6757/calxedas-arm-server-tested

    Lots of charts, here's a few:
    This is all quite interesting...

    Every time I hear about Macs in the enterprise, or when people say Apple is more focussed on consumers and not interested in enterprise, I wonder how Apple handles their own internal enterprise needs. Obviously, one of the largest tech companies on the planet would know a thing or two about enterprise, so it was always a bit perplexing to me that Apple would not have more products to offer in this regard.

    We first visited Apple HQ in July 1978... As we drove up we saw two employees carrying IBM Disk Packs into the back of the building -- so they, obviously, were using an IBM computer.

    Later, in the 1980s, Apple had at least 1 Cray maimframe for R&D.  I assume they still used IBM computers for accounting (or possibly some Unix machines).

    During the mid 1880s, we sold/installed 7 Corvus LANs in various departments within Apple Headquarters, for example the PR department.

    Apple also had a satellite earth station that they used to broadcast live whatever to their offices around the world.  I think this predated Walmart broadcasting Monday Rah-Rah meetings to all the US Walmart stores.

    So, yes, Apple has used enterprise class electronics since the early days -- but they never publicized it.

    I suspect that Steve Jobs wasn't proud of that fact -- but it didn't affect his decision to hire Tim, with his IBM/Compac enterprise background...

    Or, maybe it did?

    roundaboutnow
  • Reply 38 of 48
    ksec said:
    I am actually interested in how many manage those. From Update to provisioning. Apple has been lacking software in this department from both macOS and iOS devices. From SME to Enterprise. Or correct me if I am wrong.

    Apple deployment programs and Jamf Pro – helping IT achieve mythical status.

    They may not know your name, but they’ll know you do big things.

    We know you like to start your day with an empty inbox and zero help tickets. Jamf Pro empowers you to do just that and deliver the IT experience users have only dreamed of. Provision the perfect Mac, iPad or iPhone with the right software, apps and settings, and deploy each device seamlessly with the workflow of your choosing. 




    https://www.jamf.com/products/jamf-pro/deployment/

    edited October 2016 williamlondon
  • Reply 39 of 48

    dklebedev said:
    sog35 said:
    The business market is ripe for an iOS Desktop

    A10X 
    128 GB Flash
    Keyboard/Mouse 
    $299

    256 GB Flash $349
    512 GB Flash $399

    Wouldn't that require Apple to build mouse support for iOS?
    This would be so easy for them to resolve. They would start with tvOS (which is a non-touch iOS variant) and implement not a mouse (that's silly) but rather a TouchPad to continue the "touch" paradigm on a non-touch iOS screen. It could operate like this, when you touch the TouchPad an area of the screen displays a small area the size of the end of your finger by defocusing the area to represent where you are "touching" on the screen. When you picked your finger up off the TouchPad the "cursor" would disappear. This would easily retain the touch paradigm of iOS without ruining the "touch based" iOS experience. If you move to an entry box, the cursors changes (as it does in tvOS), if you click something, it'll select whatever it's supposed to select, and on and on. You could select tools and use the TouchPad to navigate, they could really do an elegant job of it. tvOS uses a small touchpad on the remote, so Apple is already quite a way there, they just need to extend it a bit. It could work, if they do it I hope they go that way rather than introduce an ugly mouse and pointer to what is quite an elegant and simple OS.


    http://www.apple.com/shop/product/MJ2R2LL/A/magic-trackpad-2

    They could include a touch pad similar to the above with BT 5.

    Your idea to start with tvOS is a good one.   And, Apple could implement HandOff in tvOS, so that any iPad or iPhone could be used as a temporary display when the desktop device is used as a headless server.

    edited October 2016 williamlondonroundaboutnow
  • Reply 40 of 48
    sog35 said:
    dklebedev said:
    sog35 said:
    The business market is ripe for an iOS Desktop

    A10X 
    128 GB Flash
    Keyboard/Mouse 
    $299

    256 GB Flash $349
    512 GB Flash $399

    Wouldn't that require Apple to build mouse support for iOS?
    This would be so easy for them to resolve. They would start with tvOS (which is a non-touch iOS variant) and implement not a mouse (that's silly) but rather a TouchPad to continue the "touch" paradigm on a non-touch iOS screen. It could operate like this, when you touch the TouchPad an area of the screen displays a small area the size of the end of your finger by defocusing the area to represent where you are "touching" on the screen. When you picked your finger up off the TouchPad the "cursor" would disappear. This would easily retain the touch paradigm of iOS without ruining the "touch based" iOS experience. If you move to an entry box, the cursors changes (as it does in tvOS), if you click something, it'll select whatever it's supposed to select, and on and on. You could select tools and use the TouchPad to navigate, they could really do an elegant job of it. tvOS uses a small touchpad on the remote, so Apple is already quite a way there, they just need to extend it a bit. It could work, if they do it I hope they go that way rather than introduce an ugly mouse and pointer to what is quite an elegant and simple OS.
    Like this idea.


    Or, something like this, done in Apple style:


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