CrossOver 16 adds Microsoft Office 2013 & 64-bit application virtualization

Posted:
in Mac Software
Windows software solution CrossOver for macOS has updated, and with the update comes full compatibility for the Microsoft Office 2013 suite and 64-bit applications for the first time.




Codeweavers, the CrossOver developers, heralds that Microsoft Office 2013 can now be installed in a CrossOver wrapper, either though a software license, or through an Office 365 subscription. Microsoft Project 2013, Visio 2013, and Outlook 2013 are not yet supported, but the company claims that each are "under active development" with support added soon.

CrossOver 16 also brings functional improvements to financial management package Quicken, and the Microsoft Office 2010 suite. Other fixes include work on audio in Blizzard titles.

Initial AppleInsider testing has shown more "recipes" for Windows software installation now available, as well as application execution speed improvements on some upgraded bottles.

CrossOver 16 is based on the upcoming compatibility-layer software Wine 2.0. Wine 2, when released, will include Codeweavers-provided improvements to the core technology that CrossOver uses to run Windows applications.

Mac customers with active support entitlements will be upgraded to CrossOver 16 the next time they launch CrossOver. Otherwise, a year of updates for CrossOver retails for $60, with a two-week free trial available.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    Supp0rtLinuxSupp0rtLinux Posts: 5unconfirmed, member
    "... either though a software license, or through an Office 365 subscription ..."
    I must be confused... if you have an Office 365 subscription and/or software license why would you go the kludgy reverse-engineered route to install something you can just install natively? I can see it for Visio or Project since MS doesn't make it available for the Mac. But Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and Outlook all exist natively on MacOS now either through Office 365 or enterprise volume license so why put another layer in between? And if "... Microsoft Project 2013, Visio 2013, and Outlook 2013 are not yet supported... " then I'm really lost as to why anyone would pay for this on Mac. On Linux... yeah, I could see it, but why on the Mac?

    Also, the title of the article says "CrossOver 16 adds Microsoft Office 2013 & 64-bit application virtualization" what does this "virtualization" gain you over just using Fusion or Parallels and integrating the native Windows app into your menu bar and app tray? Don't get me wrong... I've been a Linux admin for years and embraced Crossover on Linux many years ago... I just don't see the point of it for Mac. Could someone please enlighten me?
    edited December 2016
  • Reply 2 of 9
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    Because Office 2013 for Mac and Windows aren't precisely the same.
  • Reply 3 of 9
    Also, the title of the article says "CrossOver 16 adds Microsoft Office 2013 & 64-bit application virtualization" what does this "virtualization" gain you over just using Fusion or Parallels and integrating the native Windows app into your menu bar and app tray? Don't get me wrong... I've been a Linux admin for years and embraced Crossover on Linux many years ago... I just don't see the point of it for Mac. Could someone please enlighten me?
    Crossover has dramatically less overhead than running a whole other operating system in a full virtual machine. People complain that the new MacBook Pro "isn't a Pro machine" because it's limited to 16 GB of RAM. This kind of thing lets you reduce your RAM consumption because you don't need to run all of Windows to get at your application.

    The same fundamental drive is behind the Docker craze, which is driving some truly unfortunate development in the Linux world such as systemd. An OS consumes X disk space and Y RAM just to start. If you have 50 VMs on a host, guess what: you burn 50X and 50Y. There are technologies to reduce this like linked clones and RAM deduplication, but they are limited by the hypervisor not necessarily knowing what you're doing in the guest. Multiple "containers" all running on one host OS only need to burn the drive space and RAM to run the host instance of the OS. Ideally, each container should believe itself to have exclusive access to the full disk, the full RAM space, and so forth, but that access will actually be arbitrated. Right now, containers on Linux are a bit of a mess, and most "container hypervisors" actually spin up a separate full VM per container. Or they run all the containers on the same OS with no real separation such that one can interfere with another.

    FreeBSD jails (which provide the origin of the term "jailbreak" on iOS devices) and Solaris zones are significantly more capable than any Linux containerization system I've seen. In fact, Solaris zones can be "branded", which lets them do syscall translation. This lets you run Solaris 8 software unmodified on Solaris 10 by responding to syscalls from inside the branded zone as if the kernel were Solaris 8. One of the brands available is "LX", which does Linux syscall translation to run a lot of Linux software in zones. Check out SmartOS some time.

    Bringing it back around, syscall translation is fundamentally how Wine operates. Over time, the developers add more calls they handle and they improve their handling of edge cases of existing calls. It's very neat technology, and I'm happy to support it. Now that Samsung owns Joyent, I'd love to see them invest significantly in Wine and make "Win32" branded zones for SmartOS! Might be a little harder than LX-branded zones, but I bet it's doable. ;)
    dewmepscooter63
  • Reply 4 of 9
    I used to use CrossOver before when I had to use IE for one specific purpose. I had no issues.
  • Reply 5 of 9
    zimmie said:
    Also, the title of the article says "CrossOver 16 adds Microsoft Office 2013 & 64-bit application virtualization" what does this "virtualization" gain you over just using Fusion or Parallels and integrating the native Windows app into your menu bar and app tray? Don't get me wrong... I've been a Linux admin for years and embraced Crossover on Linux many years ago... I just don't see the point of it for Mac. Could someone please enlighten me?
    Crossover has dramatically less overhead than running a whole other operating system in a full virtual machine. People complain that the new MacBook Pro "isn't a Pro machine" because it's limited to 16 GB of RAM. This kind of thing lets you reduce your RAM consumption because you don't need to run all of Windows to get at your application.

    The same fundamental drive is behind the Docker craze, which is driving some truly unfortunate development in the Linux world such as systemd. An OS consumes X disk space and Y RAM just to start. If you have 50 VMs on a host, guess what: you burn 50X and 50Y. There are technologies to reduce this like linked clones and RAM deduplication, but they are limited by the hypervisor not necessarily knowing what you're doing in the guest. Multiple "containers" all running on one host OS only need to burn the drive space and RAM to run the host instance of the OS. Ideally, each container should believe itself to have exclusive access to the full disk, the full RAM space, and so forth, but that access will actually be arbitrated. Right now, containers on Linux are a bit of a mess, and most "container hypervisors" actually spin up a separate full VM per container. Or they run all the containers on the same OS with no real separation such that one can interfere with another.

    FreeBSD jails (which provide the origin of the term "jailbreak" on iOS devices) and Solaris zones are significantly more capable than any Linux containerization system I've seen. In fact, Solaris zones can be "branded", which lets them do syscall translation. This lets you run Solaris 8 software unmodified on Solaris 10 by responding to syscalls from inside the branded zone as if the kernel were Solaris 8. One of the brands available is "LX", which does Linux syscall translation to run a lot of Linux software in zones. Check out SmartOS some time.

    Bringing it back around, syscall translation is fundamentally how Wine operates. Over time, the developers add more calls they handle and they improve their handling of edge cases of existing calls. It's very neat technology, and I'm happy to support it. Now that Samsung owns Joyent, I'd love to see them invest significantly in Wine and make "Win32" branded zones for SmartOS! Might be a little harder than LX-branded zones, but I bet it's doable. ;)
    Know what takes even less space?  Running the applications natively.  That was the OP's point.
  • Reply 6 of 9
    I hope Visio can run on the Mac under crossover soon. This is one of the last holdouts that requires a Windows VM on the Mac for most engineers. I'm sure Project Managers can't wait for MS Project support under crossover. 

    Id also like to be able to run Cisco IP Communicator, Cisco RTMT, and VMware vSphere Client under Crossover, but this will most likely never happen. 
    Habi_tweet
  • Reply 7 of 9
    zimmiezimmie Posts: 204member
    larrya said:
    Know what takes even less space?  Running the applications natively.  That was the OP's point.
    For the specific applications Word 2013, Excel 2013, PowerPoint 2013, and Outlook 2013, that may be feasible. Even so, CrossOver runs on more than just macOS. Where's the Linux-native version of those applications? That's the audience targeted by CodeWeavers' specific mention of Office.

    Tons of crazy business applications don't currently have Mac equivalents. CrossOver gives them a good chance of working under macOS as long as they don't rely on some crazy edge-case behavior of Windows APIs.
  • Reply 8 of 9
    zimmiezimmie Posts: 204member

    sirozha said:
    I hope Visio can run on the Mac under crossover soon. This is one of the last holdouts that requires a Windows VM on the Mac for most engineers. I'm sure Project Managers can't wait for MS Project support under crossover. 

    Id also like to be able to run Cisco IP Communicator, Cisco RTMT, and VMware vSphere Client under Crossover, but this will most likely never happen. 
    Ha. Our VMware guys tell me the VIC won't work with vCenter 6.5 at all. Once you upgrade, you get an HTML5 client for vCenter-only operations, or the awful Flash client for anything that requires integration (like NSX).

    Regarding other applications, have you checked CodeWeavers' compatibility reports? Visio 2010 is rated as "Runs well" on macOS and Linux. Nobody has sent a report on Cisco IP Communicator in a while.
  • Reply 9 of 9
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,998member
    Steam running in Crossover?  I wonder how it manages the GPUs if you have two without AMD Catalyst drivers?
    watto_cobra
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