Apple officially named as founding member of Partnership for AI, Siri founder named to boa...

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As expected, Apple has been formally inducted into the Partnership on AI as a founding member, naming Siri-founder and Apple exec Tom Gruber to the board of trustees for the group.




Announcing the addition of Apple, the organization noted that the company has been "involved and collaborating" with the partnership before it was ever announced. Apple joins Amazon, Facebook, Google/DeepMind, IBM, and Microsoft as corporate members of the group.

The first meeting of the newly formed Board of Trustees is taking place on Feb. 3 in San Francisco. The board will name an executive steering committee, and an executive director at some point.

Officially titled the "Partnership on Artificial Intelligence to Benefit People and Society," the group's stated goals are to pool resources and develop interoperability for the future of AI technology. At this time, the group has declared that it does not intend to become a governmental lobbyist group.

To meet its goals, the organization anticipates it will "host discussions, commission studies, write and distribute reports on critical topics, and seek to develop and share best practices and standards for industry." Additionally, the group states that it will "conduct outreach with the public and across the industry on topics related to advancing better understanding of AI systems and the potential applications and implications of this technology as they arise."

"This group is a huge step forward, breaking down barriers for AI teams to share best practices, research ways to maximize societal benefits and tackle ethical concerns, and make it easier for those in other fields to engage with everyone's work." said Google's Greg Corrado and the initiative's other chairman Mustafa Suleyman from Google-owned DeepMind in a joint statement when the group was founded in Sept. 2016. "We're really proud of how this has come together, and we're looking forward to working with everyone inside and outside the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence to make sure AI has the broad and transformative impact we all want to see."

Apple's Tom Gruber studied psychology and computer science at Loyola University New Orleans, and recieved a M.S. in Computer and Information Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus.

Following the M.S, he obtained a Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science in 1988, also at the University of Massachusetts. He co-founded the original parent company of Siri, and was brought on by Apple when the company acquired the company in 2010.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,443member
    Congrats to all involved, let's hope great things come of this.
    canukstorm
  • Reply 2 of 24
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,452member
    I’ve been watching Marvel’s Agents of Shield and all this AI and android stuff is scaring me. What ever happened to Issac Asimov’s three laws of robotics? Hmm?
  • Reply 3 of 24
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,024member
    Q: Hey Siri, what time does the art museum close? 
    A: There are 5 tacos places in your area.
  • Reply 4 of 24
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,024member
    Most advances in tech are to promote consuming. The WWW was originally about sharing information now it is a shopping mall. 
  • Reply 5 of 24
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,521member
    spice-boy said:
    Most advances in tech are to promote consuming. The WWW was originally about sharing information now it is a shopping mall. 
    You are clearly using the WWW wrong. Other people have increased their knowledge exponentially.
    StrangeDayscaliMacProuraharawaltg
  • Reply 6 of 24
    spice-boy said:
    Most advances in tech are to promote consuming. The WWW was originally about sharing information now it is a shopping mall. 
    You sound bitter. The web is a platform that offers many things to any people, not one thing to all people. Do what you will with it. 

    Tho I have no idea what that has to do with this story. 
  • Reply 7 of 24

    spice-boy said:
    Q: Hey Siri, what time does the art museum close? 
    A: There are 5 tacos places in your area.
    I doubt you're being truthful here. Can you share a screenshot of the actual query and response?
    cali
  • Reply 8 of 24
    flaneur said:
    spice-boy said:
    Most advances in tech are to promote consuming. The WWW was originally about sharing information now it is a shopping mall. 
    You are clearly using the WWW wrong. Other people have increased their knowledge exponentially.
    I agree that he was being overly broad in his critique of the Web, but I don't believe rapid and convenient access to information has increased our knowledge. It seems to have made most of us just more credulous. I blame Trump on the Web. 
    spice-boy
  • Reply 9 of 24
    Most of what is being passed off as AI are just tricks. A horse trained to tap out the answer to an addition problem with its hoof is not a demonstration of intelligence. Agents such as Siri and Alexa aren't thinking, just giving pre-programmed responses to key words. Even Watson is just an exponentially greater version of this. When Watson spontaneously comes up with a leap of imagination along the lines of Einstein's Theory of Relativity I'll say we have turned the corner. 
  • Reply 10 of 24
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,258member
    Most of what is being passed off as AI are just tricks. A horse trained to tap out the answer to an addition problem with its hoof is not a demonstration of intelligence. Agents such as Siri and Alexa aren't thinking, just giving pre-programmed responses to key words. Even Watson is just an exponentially greater version of this. When Watson spontaneously comes up with a leap of imagination along the lines of Einstein's Theory of Relativity I'll say we have turned the corner. 
    I would have thought that AI beating humans at a game (Go) that requires planning and creative strategy would have impressed you. That's not simply being trained to tap out an answer
  • Reply 11 of 24
    I have played Go since the 70s. Go, like any board game with a fixed number spaces, can be reduced to a finite number of variables. Given enough number crunching power a machine will win. Just like chess. 
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 12 of 24
    Even the Turing test is suspect in my opinion. Saying that a machine is intelligent when it manifests intelligent behavior indistinguishable from human ignores the "mask" effect. A talented and well researched actor can fool even a sugeon into believing he is a fellow surgeon. A computer could fool us into thinking it is human quite easily I think. 
    edited January 2017
  • Reply 13 of 24
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,258member
    I have played Go since the 70s. Go, like any board game with a fixed number spaces, can be reduced to a finite number of variables. Given enough number crunching power a machine will win. Just like chess. 
    Sure doesn't sound like the easy game you're portraying it is. http://www.nature.com/news/google-reveals-secret-test-of-ai-bot-to-beat-top-go-players-1.21253 https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-the-computer-beat-the-go-master/
  • Reply 14 of 24
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,024member
    flaneur said:
    spice-boy said:
    Most advances in tech are to promote consuming. The WWW was originally about sharing information now it is a shopping mall. 
    You are clearly using the WWW wrong. Other people have increased their knowledge exponentially.
    I wasn't talking about me. Do you really believe most people go online to learn something? 
  • Reply 15 of 24
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,024member


    spice-boy said:
    Q: Hey Siri, what time does the art museum close? 
    A: There are 5 tacos places in your area.
    I doubt you're being truthful here. Can you share a screenshot of the actual query and response?
    You are taking this a bit too literally. My point is when you ask Siri a simple question which it has no experience with the answer can be really random. 
  • Reply 16 of 24
    spice-boy said:


    spice-boy said:
    Q: Hey Siri, what time does the art museum close? 
    A: There are 5 tacos places in your area.
    I doubt you're being truthful here. Can you share a screenshot of the actual query and response?
    You are taking this a bit too literally. My point is when you ask Siri a simple question which it has no experience with the answer can be really random. 
    It's your post. When I ask siri what time a specific museum closes, it tells me. if i'm vague, it lists all the museums near me and i can tap one for its POI details. if i ask about something random about cats, it returns Bing search results. 

    So your assertion that it comes back with random answers, like tacos, is bunk. 
    LukeCage
  • Reply 17 of 24
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,417member
    lkrupp said:
    I’ve been watching Marvel’s Agents of Shield and all this AI and android stuff is scaring me. What ever happened to Issac Asimov’s three laws of robotics? Hmm?
    You expected the Three Laws to be the 'Foundation' of AI??? ;)

  • Reply 18 of 24
    It's a well known fact by top Physicists around the globe that the state of AI is that of the mind of a Fruit Fly. The Singularity is nowhere on the horizon. In fact, the more they explore the parallels of the mind it seems more natural to develop nanomachines to enhance Humanity that to attempt to replace it.
    boredumbasdasd
  • Reply 19 of 24
    Even the Turing test is suspect in my opinion. Saying that a machine is intelligent when it manifests intelligent behavior indistinguishable from human ignores the "mask" effect. A talented and well researched actor can fool even a sugeon into believing he is a fellow surgeon. A computer could fool us into thinking it is human quite easily I think. 
    And that is when they strike, when we've been lulled into complacency with our "intelligent assistants". ;)
  • Reply 20 of 24
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,258member
    I have played Go since the 70s. Go, like any board game with a fixed number spaces, can be reduced to a finite number of variables. Given enough number crunching power a machine will win. Just like chess. 

    "...Silver could revisit the precise calculations AlphaGo made in choosing Move 37. Drawing on its extensive training with millions upon millions of human moves, the machine actually calculates the probability that a human will make a particular play in the midst of a game. “That’s how it guides the moves it considers,” Silver says. For Move 37, the probability was one in ten thousand. In other words, AlphaGo knew this was not a move that a professional Go player would make.

    But, drawing on all its other training with millions of moves generated by games with itself, it came to view Move 37 in a different way. It came to realize that, although no professional would play it, the move would likely prove quite successful. “It discovered this for itself,” Silver says, “through its own process of introspection and analysis.”

    Is introspection the right word? You can be the judge. But Fan Hui was right. The move was inhuman. But it was also beautiful."

    https://www.wired.com/2016/03/googles-ai-viewed-move-no-human-understand/

    edited January 2017
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