MCX sells one-time Apple Pay challenger CurrentC to JPMorgan Chase

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 52
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,035member

    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    That's simple:   When CVS refused to accept ApplePay, I switched to Walgreens.   When my local grocery store refused to accept Apple Pay I switched to TraderJoes.   Aside from the convenience, accepting ApplePay demonstrates the store values its customers and their privacy  -- So, as a customer, I value that store.   But, now that I have an AppleWatch, the convenience is terrific too -- I don't have to reach for anything.
    There's no denying Apple Pay's convenient, but there is no tangental issue I've experienced at my grocery store. They allow you to go paperless by emailing you your receipt, but since an Apple Pay card number creates a unique 16-digit card number for each device you do need to input your email address for your iPhone and Apple Watch. Still, not a big deal, unless you're having a wonky issue with your iPhone where you're having to wipe the device, which you can't do before you disable iCloud which then kills Apple Pay for both devices. When you set it up again your financial institution gives you new 16-digit card numbers to use with Apple Pay which means I'll have re-enter my email address into their touchscreen device for paperless billing. While this scenario (which is real and real annoying as part of a larger bug with my iCloud account), it would naturally occur if I had to replace my phone for any reason, which typically means once a year.
  • Reply 22 of 52
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 965member
    I reckon they paid for a handful of patents, some research, maybe a few developers who at least understand payments and encryption really well. The tech is useless.
    edited March 2017 watto_cobraStrangeDayscornchip
  • Reply 23 of 52
    Chase is a crappy company. Screwed around my wife's 97 year old Holocaust survivor mother by holding on to her funds and making it difficult to get her account in order. Must use the float and try to hold onto funds as long as possible. " Sad"
    watto_cobrabaconstang
  • Reply 24 of 52
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Templeton said:
    Chase is a crappy company. Screwed around my wife's 97 year old Holocaust survivor mother by holding on to her funds and making it difficult to get her account in order. Must use the float and try to hold onto funds as long as possible. " Sad"
    Chase is vile trash.
     
    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2012-06-18/dear-mr-dimon-is-your-bank-getting-corporate-welfare-
    watto_cobrabaconstang
  • Reply 25 of 52
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,450member
    Don't worry Chase when you make foolish investments and purchases as this one your BFF President will bail you out. 
    lostkiwiwatto_cobracornchipGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 26 of 52
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 599member
    The more options, the better so long as they are as secure as Apple Pay. We can only benefit from competition. Current C failed for a variety of reasons - with the savvy consumer it was because of security concerns. With companies that signed on it was because they thought they could cut out the financial institutions and take that piece of the pie for themselves. Combine those two pieces and you have guaranteed failure especially when my locker at the clubhouse is more secure than there payment system was. JP Morgan bought the tech and it may have value to them. That doesn't mean they will put it out there as a product. There are a lot of reasons to buy up assets that have nothing to do with using them on the front end of a market.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 52
    StukeyStukey Posts: 12member
    Laughing. The only victory or win MCX can state is that they found a sucker unto which they could unload the remains of CurrentC. Nothing else comes from this story. Well, maybe that JP Chase needs new executive management because I'd fire the idiots who signed off on this purchase. 
    edited March 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 52
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    Lol. Deducted this back when Apple Pay was being blocked in favor of whenever current-c would get its act together. If the mcx actually cared about security, convenience, and ease of use like they say, they'd simply throw full support behind Apple Pay. 

    The only solution that that actually protects the consumer instead of tracks the consumer. 
    Everyone knew CurrentC was going to flop. It earned the negative feedback before even launching due to merchants turning off NFC payments.

    This is what happens when merchants get greedy. Credit cards have been a staple of American commerce since 1959. Making harder than the original card was doomed to fail. The reason Apple Pay works and bad alternatives like Google and Samsung have repeatedly failed, is because to make Apple Pay work, you can use it everywhere there is a NFC-enabled card terminal, which is pretty much everywhere. These alternatives don't work, are insecure (MST), or require special equipment not already present. So the end result is that you're better off using the plastic card you already have than have to flip through apps, or figure out how to hold the phone for it to work.

    As an example of poor design. Many "loyalty cards" still use bar codes, and if you have a screen protector on your phone, most barcode readers can't read through it.
    lostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 52
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    That's simple:   When CVS refused to accept ApplePay, I switched to Walgreens.   When my local grocery store refused to accept Apple Pay I switched to TraderJoes.   Aside from the convenience, accepting ApplePay demonstrates the store values its customers and their privacy  -- So, as a customer, I value that store.   But, now that I have an AppleWatch, the convenience is terrific too -- I don't have to reach for anything.
    You do so at your own inconvenience. I shop almost exclusively at Trader Joes, but there are many things I have to go to other grocery chains to provide. I've found Walgreens is typically more expensive than CVS, and locations less convenient than CVS. I'm not about to overpay for anything, do without, much less drive out of my way because a particular merchant doesn't support a payment method.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 52
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,088member
    Heh... I totally forgot about them.   It's like one day they were there, then overnight shuttered the place down and left hoping no one would notice.

    Good riddance.
    lostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 52
    If Chase drops Apple Pay I'll drop them. No hesitation.

    Edit/add: Looks like I'm not the only one.
    edited March 2017 ai46lostkiwiwatto_cobraGeorgeBMacslprescottbadmonk
  • Reply 32 of 52
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    I don't understand how you think there will be a McDonald's Pay, Pepsi Pay, etc. The systems already established are for devices, like an Apple device, that uses their SW and HW setup to connect into a financial institution's universal backend design, hence Apple Pay. But not everything is going to run off an Apple device, which then severely limits not only general use, but also makes it less safe for Apple Pay users because they will still have to carry physical cards more often because of the article limitation you suggest.

    I know Tag Heuer unveiled a watch that runs Android Wear so I assume that it will use Android Pay if it contains NFC and other necessary HW, but what about Swatch Group? It looks like the Swatch Bellamy will use a homegrown SW design so why should someone who buys a modernized Swatch Group watch from one of their many brands to include the benefits of a secure, NFC-based payment system on-board? It surely won't be a Apple Pay so what is so wrong with there being Swatch Pay that would allow this functionality? The same for Fitbit and other wrist-worn wearables.
    Bellamy has a 2 year lifespan before its payment authorization expires. I don't know what one must do to renew it. Can't imagine it means replacing the watch, but it seems like a lousy concept. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 52
    misa said:
    Everyone knew CurrentC was going to flop. It earned the negative feedback before even launching due to merchants turning off NFC payments.


    This is what happens when merchants get greedy. Credit cards have been a staple of American commerce since 1959. Making harder than the original card was doomed to fail. The reason Apple Pay works and bad alternatives like Google and Samsung have repeatedly failed, is because to make Apple Pay work, you can use it everywhere there is a NFC-enabled card terminal, which is pretty much everywhere. These alternatives don't work, are insecure (MST), or require special equipment not already present. So the end result is that you're better off using the plastic card you already have than have to flip through apps, or figure out how to hold the phone for it to work.
    Android Pay, its Google Wallet predecessor, and Samsung Pay all use the same NFC technology that Apple Pay uses, and they work everywhere Apple Pay works. Samsung Pay actually works more places, in fact, because their phones are equipped with these weird magnetic emitters that supposedly can fake a physical card swipe for non-NFC-enabled terminals. Of course, I've never used it, since I don't have a Samsung phone, so I have no idea how well it works.

    But yeah. CurrentC. It failed because 1) hardly anyone had ever even heard of it, and 2) those who had heard of it were usually pissed off. Interestingly, it's not the first time someone has tried, and failed, to do this sort of thing. Back in 2011 when Android Pay was called Google Wallet, it had a heck of a time catching on because Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile blocked it from accessing the NFC chip on any carrier-branded phone, because the carriers were trying to push their own competing product. That competing product, naturally, took two whole years to come out, and when it finally did, it was slow, buggy as hell, and never had support from more than two or three credit cards. The coup de grâce, though? The competing product was named—I kid you not—ISIS Mobile Wallet. They hastily renamed the thing to Softcard after, well, ISIS, but by that point they were already pretty thoroughly screwed, and they didn't last long.
    edited March 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 52
    Breaking:  MCX CEO and spin master general Brian Mooney appointed as new White House press secretary. 
  • Reply 35 of 52
    I switched our family's prescriptions from Rite Aid to Walgreens because Rite Aid wouldn't accept Apple Pay. Since then, Rite Aid changed its policy, but our family is now established with Walgreens. We are not switching back. Too little, too late.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 36 of 52
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Soli said:

    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    That's simple:   When CVS refused to accept ApplePay, I switched to Walgreens.   When my local grocery store refused to accept Apple Pay I switched to TraderJoes.   Aside from the convenience, accepting ApplePay demonstrates the store values its customers and their privacy  -- So, as a customer, I value that store.   But, now that I have an AppleWatch, the convenience is terrific too -- I don't have to reach for anything.
    There's no denying Apple Pay's convenient, but there is no tangental issue I've experienced at my grocery store. They allow you to go paperless by emailing you your receipt, but since an Apple Pay card number creates a unique 16-digit card number for each device you do need to input your email address for your iPhone and Apple Watch. Still, not a big deal, unless you're having a wonky issue with your iPhone where you're having to wipe the device, which you can't do before you disable iCloud which then kills Apple Pay for both devices. When you set it up again your financial institution gives you new 16-digit card numbers to use with Apple Pay which means I'll have re-enter my email address into their touchscreen device for paperless billing. While this scenario (which is real and real annoying as part of a larger bug with my iCloud account), it would naturally occur if I had to replace my phone for any reason, which typically means once a year.
    I have no idea what you are babbling about...
    But, as I said, my local grocer doesn't accept ApplePay -- so I go elsewhere where my transaction is quick & simple and my personal information is safe & secure.
  • Reply 37 of 52
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Templeton said:
    Chase is a crappy company. Screwed around my wife's 97 year old Holocaust survivor mother by holding on to her funds and making it difficult to get her account in order. Must use the float and try to hold onto funds as long as possible. " Sad"
    I am sorry to hear that you and your wife had trouble with them.
    My experience has been the opposite.   Their website works.   Their cards function well.  And, I really like how I get a text message on my phone & watch within a few seconds of a charge being made on my card (usually before I even leave the store) -- it's one of the best security measures I have seen anywhere.  Essentially, I couldn't ask for more.

    But, that being said, they are not the only game in town and, if they drop ApplePay, I will drop them.  But I doubt that they will:  It was them that told me to use ApplePay instead of their chip card because it is more secure.
    edited March 2017 watto_cobramike1
  • Reply 38 of 52
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    mac_128 said:
    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    That's simple:   When CVS refused to accept ApplePay, I switched to Walgreens.   When my local grocery store refused to accept Apple Pay I switched to TraderJoes.   Aside from the convenience, accepting ApplePay demonstrates the store values its customers and their privacy  -- So, as a customer, I value that store.   But, now that I have an AppleWatch, the convenience is terrific too -- I don't have to reach for anything.
    You do so at your own inconvenience. I shop almost exclusively at Trader Joes, but there are many things I have to go to other grocery chains to provide. I've found Walgreens is typically more expensive than CVS, and locations less convenient than CVS. I'm not about to overpay for anything, do without, much less drive out of my way because a particular merchant doesn't support a payment method.
    Actually, I do not find it inconvenient at all...   The places I shop at because they have Apple Pay are no further or harder to get to than the one's that don't.  Neither do I find them any more expensive (often they are less expensive).  

    But, even if I did find them less convenient, the fact that they accept ApplePay shows their commitment to their customer (me!).  And, I find that commitment carries over into other aspects of their business that makes it well worth shopping there.   Essentially I value those merchants who value me and my business and I avoid those that do not value me or my business -- and a good indication of that is whether or not they accept ApplePay. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 39 of 52
    flydogflydog Posts: 1,121member
    Soli said:

    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    That's simple:   When CVS refused to accept ApplePay, I switched to Walgreens.   When my local grocery store refused to accept Apple Pay I switched to TraderJoes.   Aside from the convenience, accepting ApplePay demonstrates the store values its customers and their privacy  -- So, as a customer, I value that store.   But, now that I have an AppleWatch, the convenience is terrific too -- I don't have to reach for anything.
    There's no denying Apple Pay's convenient, but there is no tangental issue I've experienced at my grocery store. They allow you to go paperless by emailing you your receipt, but since an Apple Pay card number creates a unique 16-digit card number for each device you do need to input your email address for your iPhone and Apple Watch. Still, not a big deal, unless you're having a wonky issue with your iPhone where you're having to wipe the device, which you can't do before you disable iCloud which then kills Apple Pay for both devices. When you set it up again your financial institution gives you new 16-digit card numbers to use with Apple Pay which means I'll have re-enter my email address into their touchscreen device for paperless billing. While this scenario (which is real and real annoying as part of a larger bug with my iCloud account), it would naturally occur if I had to replace my phone for any reason, which typically means once a year.
    That's a retailer requirement (one that I've never come across), and has nothing to do with Apple Pay itself. 
    GeorgeBMacstompywatto_cobra
  • Reply 40 of 52
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Soli said:

    cali said:
    Soli said:
    cali said:
    "Chase Pay"

    this is getting ridiculous. 
    I'm fine with that, so long as they all follow suit with the same backend system popularized by Apple Pay, I'm perfectly happy with Android Pay, Samsung Pay, Chase Pay, Swatch Pay, Whitey Will Pay, etc.

    My only concern is that we can eventually move from having to still carry our physical cards with us when a referential card number can used with a digital token to help protect us from potential theft.
    McDonalds Pay
    Microsoft Pay
    Pepsi Pay
    FaceBook Pay
    Wal Mart Pay(oops!)
    NFL Pay

    I hope it stops. Imagine if they make us have separate apps for them all? Then it's the cluttered wallet all over again. 
    That's simple:   When CVS refused to accept ApplePay, I switched to Walgreens.   When my local grocery store refused to accept Apple Pay I switched to TraderJoes.   Aside from the convenience, accepting ApplePay demonstrates the store values its customers and their privacy  -- So, as a customer, I value that store.   But, now that I have an AppleWatch, the convenience is terrific too -- I don't have to reach for anything.
    There's no denying Apple Pay's convenient, but there is no tangental issue I've experienced at my grocery store. They allow you to go paperless by emailing you your receipt, but since an Apple Pay card number creates a unique 16-digit card number for each device you do need to input your email address for your iPhone and Apple Watch. Still, not a big deal, unless you're having a wonky issue with your iPhone where you're having to wipe the device, which you can't do before you disable iCloud which then kills Apple Pay for both devices. When you set it up again your financial institution gives you new 16-digit card numbers to use with Apple Pay which means I'll have re-enter my email address into their touchscreen device for paperless billing. While this scenario (which is real and real annoying as part of a larger bug with my iCloud account), it would naturally occur if I had to replace my phone for any reason, which typically means once a year.
    Well, Apple will slowly be integrating Fidelity cards to Apple Pay, which means that if YOU choose to give up privacy for this convenience, you'll be able to do so. The Card being linked to your account, they'll be able to track your purchases though not under which card they actually occured, only you can do that :-). Unless of course your using a store credit card... Then they'd have the whole info I guess if you can tolerate the high credit rate.
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