Apple's iOS 10.3 lets customers leave in-app ratings, developers can respond to reviews

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 2017
With Monday's iOS 10.3 release, Apple introduced new App Store tools that streamline app ratings and offer new levels of customer outreach by allowing developers to publicly respond to reviews.




Apple in a post to its developer portal detailed the StoreKit API available on iOS 10.3, noting the new backend assets deliver a variety of improvements to both developers and their customers.

For example, developers can now implement the SKStoreReviewController API to let users rate and leave reviews without leaving an app. Previously, rating request pop-ups, if accepted, transported users to the App Store app.

The cumbersome process involved at least three steps: accepting the rating request, leaving a rating and navigating back to the originating app. Due to the somewhat convoluted procedure, users often ignored such solicitation, perhaps skewing results.

In addition to in-app ratings and reviews, developers can now schedule request prompts -- up to three in a 365-day period. The ensuing prompt allows users can authenticate via Touch ID and write and submit a review.

Also included in the new StoreKit API are tools that grant developers the option of responding to app reviews. Initially announced in January, Apple said the ability to communicate with customers was a highly requested feature for developers.

With the the new API, developers can publicly respond to reviews on both the iOS and Mac App Stores. When a response is filed, a notification is sent out to the user who posted the original comment, who then has an opportunity to update their feedback.

According to Apple's explainer, there is no time limitation applied to the response mechanism, meaning developers can write back to any and all reviewers. Devs can also edit their feedback at any time and only one response per review is displayed on the app's App Store page, Apple says.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,897member
    This ought to make a lot of people happy, I'm sure someone will find something to complain about though.
    aaronjSpamSandwichbrianprince1RacerhomieX
  • Reply 2 of 11
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,075member
    YES. Just dismissed TuneIn Radio asking me for the ten millionth time if I like it (Y/N?) like a love note in school and then asking for a review. This is great.
    repressthisanton zuykov
  • Reply 3 of 11
    In addition to in-app ratings and reviews, developers can now schedule request prompts -- up to three in a 365-day period. The ensuing prompt allows users can authenticate via Touch ID and write and submit a review. 
    I don't understand, can someone elaborate...
  • Reply 4 of 11
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member
    cornchip said:
    This ought to make a lot of people happy, I'm sure someone will find something to complain about though.
    Agreed (on both counts, unfortunately).  This is definitely a step in the right direction.  Having to leave the app was ridiculously counter-productive.  This will make ranking apps much simpler.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,291member
    eriamjh said:
    It's about time. ReFeedback is important.
  • Reply 6 of 11
    When I submit reviews, it always takes a while for the submit window to go away. If click Write Review again, the review is always there. Is it submitted? And I never find my review in the Reviews. How frustrating.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    john.bjohn.b Posts: 2,740member
    The real question is, where is the App Review Nagging setting so we can turn it off?
  • Reply 8 of 11
    command_fcommand_f Posts: 381member
    In addition to in-app ratings and reviews, developers can now schedule request prompts -- up to three in a 365-day period. The ensuing prompt allows users can authenticate via Touch ID and write and submit a review. 
    I don't understand, can someone elaborate...
    An app can pop up a request to you, the user, to rate it in the App Store. Now, it can only do that 3 times a year so it's going to be a whole lot less annoying than some currently misjudged apps. The process for leaving the rating/review is also more slick. This is a Good Thing.
  • Reply 9 of 11
    noelosnoelos Posts: 120member
    john.b said:
    The real question is, where is the App Review Nagging setting so we can turn it off?
    I believe the idea is to give developers time to start using this new API and then at some point (maybe 6-12 months from now - maybe with iOS 11), developers won't be permitted to solicit feedback using anything other means (i.e. they will fail app review if they submit an app that tries to get feedback some other way). Not sure if there will be a system-wide way to turn off all review-requests, but at least on an app-by-app basis, the most prompts you can receive is 3 per annum.
  • Reply 10 of 11
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,685member
    john.b said:
    The real question is, where is the App Review Nagging setting so we can turn it off?
    its been reduced to 3 every 365 days ( if developers use this API, which they will have to)
  • Reply 11 of 11
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,825member
    john.b said:
    The real question is, where is the App Review Nagging setting so we can turn it off?
    http://osxdaily.com/2017/03/29/stop-ios-app-store-rating-review-requests/
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