On its 2nd anniversary, Apple Watch settling into role as fitness & notification wearable ...

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in Apple Watch edited April 2017
Originally pitched as a multitude of things, including an intimate communication tool and new frontier for mobile apps, the Apple Watch has been refined and simplified in the years since its debut, focusing on what Apple has determined to be the fledgling device's core strengths.




Any new platform and product category takes time to find its footing -- the first iPod was Mac-only, the first iPhone shipped without an App Store, and the first iPad required activation through iTunes before it could even be used.

The Apple Watch has been no different.

Finding what works

In the last two years, Apple has quickly learned that the less you need to interact with your wearable device, the better.

Accordingly, Apple has shown a willingness to go back to the drawing board with the Apple Watch, refining what works and eschewing what does not. Those changes have helped sales of the Apple Watch to grow, reaching a new record in the holiday 2016 quarter.

Features that work without much --or any --physical input have proven to be the "killer apps" for Apple Watch. That includes handsfree "Hey Siri," double clicking the side button for Apple Pay, and quick glances for iPhone notifications.

The Apple Watch also works well as a fitness and health device because, again, it handles most of the capabilities on its own. Closing out Activity rings is an automatic process that resets itself every day. Heart rate is automatically measured and saved to the Health app throughout the day.


Hardware pivots to more health, less fashion

Though the Apple Watch remains largely the same externally, Apple has made some tweaks on that front too. While the first-generation "Edition" model came in gold and was priced over $10,000, Apple reversed course with the second-generation model last September, switching to a more affordable white ceramic version that carries a starting price of $1,249.

Apple has also partnered with Nike on specialized versions of its watch, though the hardware is essentially identical to the standard Series 2 models. This week, the partnership with Nike will expand with a new NikeLab model set to go on sale Thursday with a new watch band color.

The partnership with Nike, in some ways, summarizes where the Apple Watch has succeeded, and where the original vision fell short.

Inside, Apple made the device far more capable with the Series 2 model thanks to a new dual-core S2 processor. Once again, this addresses some of the slowness with the original model's hardware and software. The focus is yet again a device that is both faster and easier to use.


Rapid revisions and progress

The Apple Watch was first announced in September of 2014, but didn't find its way onto the wrists of consumers until April 24 of 2015. While launch-day hardware is still supported two years later, the software has changed considerably.

At launch, third-party apps for Apple Watch did not run natively, instead offloading the processing requirements to a connected iPhone. This led to apps that loaded extremely slow -- something Apple rectified quickly, adding support for native apps with watchOS 2, and mandating apps go native by June of 2016.

The platform was shaken up even further last September with the launch of watchOS 3, which completely changed the functionality of the hardware side button. While previously the button was used for sending Digital Touch scribbles to contacts, Apple eventually realized that feature was not widely used, let alone worth the justification of a dedicated button.

With watchOS 3, the Apple Watch side button changed to link to a new app dock, allowing quick access --and background loading --of frequently used apps. The new dock also brought about the end of a swipe-up "Glances" view, instead brining a familiar Control Center for that gesture.

Third-party apps on the Apple Watch simply have not taken off in the way they did on iOS. A wearable display is too small for most apps to be useful.

The honeycomb home screen of apps gets the job done, but it's not quick or easy to use, leading to the app dock and a push for more watch face complications in watchOS 3. The core focus for Apple since the first watch launched has been speed --both software and hardware updates have emphasized a device that not only runs faster, but allows users to access what they need faster.


Apple Watch, year 3 and beyond

As the Apple Watch passes its second birthday, expect a new update this fall that could add an LTE radio for independent wireless connectivity. Undoubtedly a new model will also be faster, and offer equal-or-better battery life.

Little is known about a hypothetical "watchOS 4," but if the Apple Watch does gain cellular capabilities, it's likely that the platform will start to become less dependent on a tethered iPhone.

Beyond speed and connectivity, other logical hardware upgrades would include an always-on display, battery life that gets well over a day's worth of use, and thinner and lighter designs. It's unclear if and when the technological advances needed for those kinds of breakthroughs might be coming down the pike.

Some users have also clamored for new form factors for the Apple Watch -- specifically, a round display option in addition to the current square panel. Doing so could help the device appeal to customers who prefer traditional, round watch faces.

However, there haven't been any rumors of a forthcoming round Apple Watch. And given Apple's migration away from fashion and toward health, fitness, and ease of use, it seems unlikely that a round-screened model might arrive anytime soon.

As the Apple Watch has evolved over its first 24 months, Apple's focus has remained on simplicity and speed. Expect future updates to make it even easier and more convenient to interact with the device --helping to make it an even more integral part of Apple's ecosystem.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 49
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 267member
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    mike1
  • Reply 2 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,327member
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.
    Your 3rd-party app using the camera and LED flash to check your pulse through your finger wouldn't have been as effective as a wearable. The future of health monitoring are wearables, injectables, and even devices you swallow.

    edited April 2017 randominternetpersonpscooter63watto_cobraGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 3 of 49
    seanismorrisseanismorris Posts: 1,105member
    I'm still not seeing the killer app...

    Maybe when it gets cellular, so I can ditch the phone.

    I'd consider replacing my android phone for a watch (fitness) phone.
    allmypeople
  • Reply 4 of 49
    2old4fun2old4fun Posts: 226member
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    brucemckevin keerandominternetpersonai46wlymchiacecil444slprescottradarthekatcali
  • Reply 5 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,327member
    I'm still not seeing the killer app...

    Maybe when it gets cellular, so I can ditch the phone.

    I'd consider replacing my android phone for a watch (fitness) phone.
    Why focus on a single app as opposed to what the whole device can offer? And why does it have to replace your iPhone in order to be useful? That's like saying I don't ride a bike because I have a car or I don't use Spotify because I have music in iTunes/Music app. You can have both, and I don't think we're close to seeing cellular show up on the Watch.
    edited April 2017 kevin keeanantksundaramchiaradarthekatcalipscooter63watto_cobraGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 6 of 49
    stanhopestanhope Posts: 156member
    I once forgot to charge my Apple watch which is an integral part of my working out.  I bought a second one, different color, for just in case.  I read Jony Ivy based the Apple watch design on the Cartier "Santos" watch which I once owned.  I have an 18K Cartier "Panthere" now which I never wear which also has a square face.   I would have no use for a round form factor.  What I would like is a matrix configuration for the apps instead of that stupid moving bubble which makes no sense to me in a square environment.  Were Apple to give me that option and an LTE version that could piggyback on my data plan with little or no increase, I'd be in heaven.
    Solibrucemcwatto_cobraGeorgeBMacbb-15
  • Reply 7 of 49
    levilevi Posts: 344member
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    Sure, much of the functionality of Watch can be found on iPhone. Same can said regarding iPhone relative  iPad and MacBook. Heart rate monitoring, exercise /activity tracking and payment (Apple Pay) are better accomplished (and done so discretely) with the Watch - all of which, including music playback can be accomplished w/o iPhone present - which isn't emphasized enough IMO. Also, as some one not generally interested in traditional watches, I find Apple Watch to be significantly more appealing as I can adjust the look and function based on mood or occasion - i.e. different watch faces, bands, etc. I think sales alone show that folks are willing to spend the money. Starting price is $200+, and ASP is likely significantly higher. I myself wear a $1000 ver and recently bought a $850 ver as a gift for someone. The most expensive traditional watch I ever bought was $300 Citizen. Apple Watch is considerably more useful and better looking IMO
    Soliwatto_cobraGeorgeBMacbb-15
  • Reply 8 of 49
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,540member
    2old4fun said:
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    That is really it.  There are a number of functions which add up to an enjoyable user experience for me - but not any one "killer app".  Little things like timers and alarms which go off with a vibration but no sound, so it only alerts me without interrupting others.  Navigation left / right turns with taptic only.  Using Apple Pay on the watch multiple times every day (flip out the arm at the drive through...no need to dig into pockets for watch or phone).  Seeing the temperature, or next meeting, at a glance.  I am not a fitness junky, but greatly appreciate seeing how many active calories I am working through each day, and it helps to motivate to exercise more.
    2old4funwlymchiawatto_cobraGeorgeBMacbb-15
  • Reply 9 of 49
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,540member
    I am not so sure that LTE functionality will arrive on the watch this year.  Would be great if it does, but I have a feeling the tech isn't quite ready without impacting battery life.  I always considered that more likely in the 4th or 5th gen version.
    Soliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,327member
    brucemc said:
    2old4fun said:
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    That is really it.  There are a number of functions which add up to an enjoyable user experience for me - but not any one "killer app".  Little things like timers and alarms which go off with a vibration but no sound, so it only alerts me without interrupting others.  Navigation left / right turns with taptic only.  Using Apple Pay on the watch multiple times every day (flip out the arm at the drive through...no need to dig into pockets for watch or phone).  Seeing the temperature, or next meeting, at a glance.  I am not a fitness junky, but greatly appreciate seeing how many active calories I am working through each day, and it helps to motivate to exercise more.
    Or even just seeing who is sending you a message or calling before you get your phone out. It's a huge time saver and it's also less impolite to glance at your wrist for a split second over taking several seconds to pull out phone during a meeting or conversation.
    2old4funchiaradarthekatwatto_cobraGeorgeBMacbrucemcbb-15
  • Reply 11 of 49
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,134member
    Apple Watch is not an iPhone replacement. I still owns the original Watch and it never left my wrist in all these years save at night where it conveniently lays on top of the charger pad. I can not imagine how life could be without my Watch anymore. It becomes integral part of my day to day activities from paying coffee to checking latest news to not missing a single call [ie. you can easily misplace your muted phone but watch is always with you and will nudge you if someonce calls]. Apple Watch enhancing your iPhone functions and your life. To expect it to have a single killer app is really a wrong way of seeing this device. I also own multiple bands, and the watch itself is really versatile than you can just swap the bands for different events from sports to wedding without even looking slightly out of place.
    edited April 2017 Soli2old4funrandominternetpersonanantksundaramchiaradarthekatprairiewalkerpscooter63watto_cobraGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 12 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,327member
    brucemc said:
    I am not so sure that LTE functionality will arrive on the watch this year.  Would be great if it does, but I have a feeling the tech isn't quite ready without impacting battery life.  I always considered that more likely in the 4th or 5th gen version.
    One day, but as you say we're probably some generations away based on where cellular and battery tech is at right now. Perhaps a bigger concern is about cost of the HW, licensing, and subscription access via the carrier. If it's $10 per month to ping back onto your phone's plan would that be worth it for the average person to spend $120 a year more over purchase price? Apple has kept their upgrade cost at a steady $129 for cellular on the iPad, and with this tech needing to be more compact, will that cause the price to jump?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 49
    irelandireland Posts: 17,684member
    The home screen can keep its circular icons, but locked into a grid rather than the current digital-pizza design.
    edited April 2017 randominternetpersonanantksundaramradarthekat
  • Reply 14 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,327member
    ireland said:
    The home screen can keep it's circular icons, but they should be locked into a grid instead of the current digital-pizza design.
    I'm certainly not a fan of the home screen layout and flow.
  • Reply 15 of 49
    brucemc said:
    2old4fun said:
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    That is really it.  There are a number of functions which add up to an enjoyable user experience for me - but not any one "killer app".  Little things like timers and alarms which go off with a vibration but no sound, so it only alerts me without interrupting others.  Navigation left / right turns with taptic only.  Using Apple Pay on the watch multiple times every day (flip out the arm at the drive through...no need to dig into pockets for watch or phone).  Seeing the temperature, or next meeting, at a glance.  I am not a fitness junky, but greatly appreciate seeing how many active calories I am working through each day, and it helps to motivate to exercise more.

    I've had an Apple Watch for over a year now and go through a drive through about once a week, but I have never paid with my watch.  So I'm curious how it works.  Does the cashier hold something out, or would I be reaching into the drive through window?  I think the fact that I'm left handed, with my watch on my right wrist makes this a less appealing option.  Do they have drive throughs in the UK, where presumably right handed people are at a disadvantage?
    edited April 2017
  • Reply 16 of 49
    kevin kee said:
    Apple Watch is not an iPhone replacement. I still owns the original Watch and it never left my wrist in all these years save at night where it conveniently lays on top of the charger pad. I can not imagine how life could be without my Watch anymore. It becomes integral part of my day to day activities from paying coffee to checking latest news to not missing a single call [ie. you can easily misplace your muted phone but watch is always with you and will nudge you if someonce calls]. Apple Watch enhancing your iPhone functions and your life. To expect it to have a single killer app is really a wrong way of seeing this device. I also own multiple bands, and the watch itself is really versatile than you can just swap the bands for different events from sports to wedding without even looking slightly out of place.
    My thoughts/experience exactly. It's a superb device for the price.

    I've lost count of of how often I use to during a typical day for stocks, weather, texts, music, email checks, activity tracking, calendar alerts, and (still the most fun of all) ApplePay.
    edited April 2017 radarthekatwatto_cobrabb-15
  • Reply 17 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,327member
    brucemc said:
    2old4fun said:
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    That is really it.  There are a number of functions which add up to an enjoyable user experience for me - but not any one "killer app".  Little things like timers and alarms which go off with a vibration but no sound, so it only alerts me without interrupting others.  Navigation left / right turns with taptic only.  Using Apple Pay on the watch multiple times every day (flip out the arm at the drive through...no need to dig into pockets for watch or phone).  Seeing the temperature, or next meeting, at a glance.  I am not a fitness junky, but greatly appreciate seeing how many active calories I am working through each day, and it helps to motivate to exercise more.
    I've had an Apple Watch for over a year now and go through a drive through about once a week, but I have never paid with my watch.  So I'm curious how it works.  Does the cashier hold something out, or would I be reaching into the drive through window?  I think the fact that I'm left handed, with my watch on my right wrist makes this a less appealing option.  Do they have drive throughs in the UK, where presumably right handed people are at a disadvantage?
    That's an issue and will likely continue to be one. Even if you're watch wrist is on ten window-side whilst driving, it can still be a chore. In some ideal future perhaps our cars will also have *Pay, or pass from our watch or phone through our car, without being potentially uncomfortable, but I doubt it for some thing like drive-thru service.

    with McDonald's they have their card reader on a cable to hand out the window so you can meet hem halfway. It works, but something designed to be more portable would be better. Perhaps something on a stick will come about?
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 49
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,266member
    As someone who nearly always has my MBP and iPhone on me, I didn't think I saw the point of (personally) owning an iPad. I received an iPad 2 for a birthday present, and it quickly found its way into my everyday life to the point I'd miss it if I didn't have it with me at times. The Watch has been similar to that, but in more unexpected and essential ways. When my first gen Watch died, every day I missed that thing until I got a replacement.

    You just have to use it for a while and it'll find ways into your daily routine that you can't live without. What that is exactly varies quite a bit amongst different people. The killer app is the Watch itself.
    edited April 2017 radarthekatpscooter63GeorgeBMacwatto_cobrabb-15
  • Reply 19 of 49
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,507member
    Apple never marketed the Apple Watch as a phone replacement. Some people want it to be one, especially since Sammi Gear has cellular capability. I'm ambivalent, because of battery life and an additional data plan. If and when it happens, I'll certainly consider it.

    For me, the Watch's strength is synergy— the sum is greater than it's parts. Convenience is aggregative. All those little conveniences add to effortless, don't give it a thought big utility. And while not a fitness devotee, it has inspired me to be even more active. The various achievements are fun to collect. Great looking artwork as well.

    The killer app in a regular watch is the telling of time. The day/date or additional chronological functions are icing, unless maybe someone needs a stopwatch function. The Watch is much more than that.

    I've also been using Siri in the Watch for HomeKit home automation. Alexa is not working out so I've sent her back to her mother. Maybe down the road...  

    As for a round Watch, I'm open to the execution. It doesn't have to be a rectangular Watch in a round shape. I have more than one shirt, one pair of pants, one jacket, and one hat. There is already a bigger accumulation of band in my collection than I'd have ever thought. I have many mechanical watches, a few of them high end, all round. I have more than one Watch and wouldn't mind a round one. There would be compromises just as there are when choosing a MacBook, MacBook Air, or MacBook Pro. I'd like to have the option. 

    As for using the Watch in a drive-thru, most places don't accommodate it. I do MacDonald's from time to time, and they hold the whole Slide Card reader out the window. They have to rotate it so the NFC reader pad is at the bottom (upside down) to give it extra reach. You hold your arm out the window and 'tap' the pad. A Taptic response tell you it's done. Due to the lack of ubiquity (and poor McD management), I've had to train several employees during my purchases.

    And yeah, there's also a slight cool factor when paying with the Watch and the person on the other side of the counter is still waiting for a card or maybe a phone.
    SoliGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 49
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,615member
    I do use my Watch a lot, but just for quick peeks. It tells the time, and lets me check notifications very quickly. Occasionally I reply to a text. I also have a couple of apps that integrate nicely and use those to keep an eye on things without having to reach for my phone. So I do find it useful, but it has taken time for all the little moments to come together in my head as truly useful. For me the battery is very good. I charge it most days when I step into the shower, and that is about it. If I don't charge it I get at least three days use. 
    irelandGeorgeBMac
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