On its 2nd anniversary, Apple Watch settling into role as fitness & notification wearable ...

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  • Reply 21 of 49
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,780member

    Hardware pivots to more health, less fashion

    While the first-generation "Edition" model came in gold and was priced over $10,000, Apple reversed course with the second-generation model last September, switching to a more affordable white ceramic version that carries a starting price of $1,249.
    Er, no, they didn't pivot by not continuing the gold material. Cook stated very clearly at launch that the gold was a limited edition and was special. No one expected otherwise or that it would be around forever. That is the opposite of a limited edition. My own guess as to why they made it was 1) Ive wanted to, and 2) it generated a lot of publicity.
    irelandfastasleeppscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 49
    irelandireland Posts: 17,684member

    Hardware pivots to more health, less fashion

    While the first-generation "Edition" model came in gold and was priced over $10,000, Apple reversed course with the second-generation model last September, switching to a more affordable white ceramic version that carries a starting price of $1,249.
    Er, no, they didn't pivot by not continuing the gold material. Cook stated very clearly at launch that the gold was a limited edition and was special. No one expected otherwise or that it would be around forever. That is the opposite of a limited edition. My own guess as to why they made it was 1) Ive wanted to, and 2) it generated a lot of publicity.
    They wanted it as an option for the initial launch to show it in a range of prices and options. They did that. For AI to label it a pivot is to completely miss the point. Platinum or diamond AW could appear at any point.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 49
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    stanhope said:
    I once forgot to charge my Apple watch which is an integral part of my working out.  I bought a second one, different color, for just in case.  I read Jony Ivy based the Apple watch design on the Cartier "Santos" watch which I once owned.  I have an 18K Cartier "Panthere" now which I never wear which also has a square face.   I would have no use for a round form factor.  What I would like is a matrix configuration for the apps instead of that stupid moving bubble which makes no sense to me in a square environment.  Were Apple to give me that option and an LTE version that could piggyback on my data plan with little or no increase, I'd be in heaven.
    Ha! When the Watch was first revealed I told people the square format was nothing new. I got flamed like crazy. 

    Yes they have existed for decades at least. 
    edited April 2017 bb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 49
    kevin kee said:
    Apple Watch is not an iPhone replacement. I still owns the original Watch and it never left my wrist in all these years save at night where it conveniently lays on top of the charger pad. I can not imagine how life could be without my Watch anymore. It becomes integral part of my day to day activities from paying coffee to checking latest news to not missing a single call [ie. you can easily misplace your muted phone but watch is always with you and will nudge you if someonce calls]. Apple Watch enhancing your iPhone functions and your life. To expect it to have a single killer app is really a wrong way of seeing this device. I also own multiple bands, and the watch itself is really versatile than you can just swap the bands for different events from sports to wedding without even looking slightly out of place.
    Kevin mirrors my use of original Watch.  I have the original black band and a red one; for our hot summers the woven nylon band helps reduce sweating. Wear it always except at night when it's my bedside clock and alarm.  I've found it to be great when cooking so I can have multiple timers going for baking different dishes.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 49
    When I'm forced to visit McD's, I get frequent looks (more than usual) like I'm a psycho as I lean out and curl in my wrist around my clenched fist. Usually, "I'm paying with my watch" suffices, but Sunday, I believe she thought I was trying to barter. "My watch for a grilled-chicken salad."

    in other leisure: "Expect future updates to make it even easier and more convenient to interact with the device— helping to make it an even more integral part of Apple's ecosystem."

    We say "even," you say "more!" Even, more! Even, more!

    Let's mayhap can the Schillerisms. 
    edited April 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 49
    irelandireland Posts: 17,684member
    paxman said:
    I do use my Watch a lot, but just for quick peeks. It tells the time, and lets me check notifications very quickly. Occasionally I reply to a text. I also have a couple of apps that integrate nicely and use those to keep an eye on things without having to reach for my phone. So I do find it useful, but it has taken time for all the little moments to come together in my head as truly useful. For me the battery is very good. I charge it most days when I step into the shower, and that is about it. If I don't charge it I get at least three days use. 
    Impressive. I don't like anything on my wrists, so the product is not for me, but it is clear it's the best smartwatch on the market. They threw away existing watches and figured the best design right now for a smartwatch and they appear they guessed and designed right. For those who don't mind items on their wrist I see the AW of 15 years time being a power house of adavanced Siri commands and advanced sensors.
    edited April 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 49
    2old4fun said:
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    I'm 67, and I love my Apple Watch for its little bits of convenience, too. Adding to your list:

    I cook a lot, and I use its timer a lot. Its tap on the wrist is much better than an audible alarm. If my hands/fingers are covered with stuff, Siri will set a timer if I ask nicely.
    When I'm driving, I like the turn-by-turn chime and vibration warnings for turns coming up.
    I can start/stop/skip songs from my watch without hauling the phone out of my pocket
    I like the Breathe app with its reminders
    GeorgeBMacbb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 49
    I love my Apple Watch and have found it far more useful than I ever imagined. I live in Canada where the tap option is almost the rule rather than the exception and I use the AW for almost all my purchases.

    However, one thing that irritates me is Apples refusal to allow a "seconds" option on the Modular faces.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 49
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,263member
    I concur with all these posts saying that the value of the watch is in the sum of all its myriad parts -- rather than a single killer app.

    I use mine probably more than I realize.  But mostly:
    - Exercise tracking
    - ApplePay (the clerk frowns at those struggling with chip cards, but smiles at me!)
    - turn by turn maps where it taps my wrist
    - timer for cooking (I'm never out of earshot -- or wrist tap)
    - controlling Apple Music (It's surprisingly easy -- maybe better than the phone's interface!)
    - messaging
    - phone calls
    - notifications (calendar, messages, emails, etc...)
    - And, oh yes!   Telling time -- where I also love its watch face skipping through my favorite photos.

    While I have no real desire to see them separate the watch from the phone, I think the watch has immense potential for expansion.   Particularly, but not limited to:  new sensors such as glucose and oxygenation sensors, and enhanced exercise monitoring as well as a low-energy watch face for increased 'always on' mode.   On the last, I think Apple needs to stop favoring/relying on Nike and support and encourage high end apps to better utilize the full capabilities of the watch -- many have not yet taken advantage of the watch's full capabilities...

    I am very optimistic of the watch's future.  As Apple's first new post-Jobs product, I think they will give it their best shot.

    StrangeDaysfastasleep
  • Reply 30 of 49
    I originally thought I would never want LTE either on my watch, until I got AirPods. For things like Skiing/Mountain Biking, to not have to carry my phone at all and have access to Apple Music/Spotify would be great! The longer I wear the watch the more I miss it when its not on my wrist, as an example even just waking up in the morning making coffee, I look down at my wrist automatically to check notifications and even just turn my Sonos Music on and I don't have it on yet, its all the little convinces that add up like others have said. Im happy I bought the Sport Model first gen, as the 2nd Gen was a huge upgrade regarding speed so now I have the Stainless Black. The first gen was just too slow I think Apple could have waited even longer for Series 2 to be the first model. Looks wise I fine the Stainless Models much more attractive, just the polished steel looks much more like a real watch especially with the metal or leather bands I think they look pretty nice, you just have to be will to pay. Also the main killer App will be Apple Pay along with he health functions as they advance more in the future for sure. The US is finally accepting NFC I'd say 80% where I go, unheard of two years ago, now if just all restaurants can accept Apple pay where in business.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 49
    Interesting article...I agree with many of the posters, it's the small conveniences that add up to make the
    Apple Watch a desirable device. My daughter is Chief Resident and she told me, "...it's a 'first world' problem." She loves not having to take her iPhone out of her pocket everytime she gets a text (and she gets hundreds a day from nurses, residents, med students, etc.). She can just glance at her watch, read a text and reply all from her wrist.

    Me, I'm a runner and I love just hitting the trails with the Apple Watch and my AirPods (no phone). Two clicks and I'm running, listening to podcasts.

    I love the x-large font for telling time. I wish I could have the same size font for the temp. I'd just like to swipe and see, e.g., 85 (w/ a small 'degree' symbol) in the largest font possible, and then while running I only want to see, 'current pace' and  'Distance covered.' I'll look at cal's burned, and other data on my iPhone after my run. This would be a nice feature. And while I'm at it, I like the workout data to able to be viewed on my iPad and MacBook. And then lastly, I'm a runner and that's all I do...I wish I could choose that as a default. A few times b/c I didn't have my glasses, I went for a run only to find out I chose a 'walk' or cycle workout by mistake. :)

    The watch, coupled with the AirPods is the way to go! Can't wait for the next iteration! :)
    bb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 49
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,263member
    I originally thought I would never want LTE either on my watch, until I got AirPods. For things like Skiing/Mountain Biking, to not have to carry my phone at all and have access to Apple Music/Spotify would be great! The longer I wear the watch the more I miss it when its not on my wrist, as an example even just waking up in the morning making coffee, I look down at my wrist automatically to check notifications and even just turn my Sonos Music on and I don't have it on yet, its all the little convinces that add up like others have said. Im happy I bought the Sport Model first gen, as the 2nd Gen was a huge upgrade regarding speed so now I have the Stainless Black. The first gen was just too slow I think Apple could have waited even longer for Series 2 to be the first model. Looks wise I fine the Stainless Models much more attractive, just the polished steel looks much more like a real watch especially with the metal or leather bands I think they look pretty nice, you just have to be will to pay. Also the main killer App will be Apple Pay along with he health functions as they advance more in the future for sure. The US is finally accepting NFC I'd say 80% where I go, unheard of two years ago, now if just all restaurants can accept Apple pay where in business.
    The original generation was only slow because of the OS.  Once they upgraded everything to Watch OS3, the original and series 1 & 2 are all pretty much comparable in speed for most functions.   The series 1 and particularly the series 2 offer additional functionality not available on the original series. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 49
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,540member
    brucemc said:
    2old4fun said:
    bitmod said:
    I looked at one last week. The Apple store employee was touting the health feature of tracking pulse.
    I told them my phone can also check my pulse. I then proceeded to show them how as they had no idea you could.
    As the watch still needs to be paired to the phone - the only advantage of the watch is a little bit of convenience.

    I could see it being handy for the fitness enthusiast who wants to monitor pulse while working out, (you have to be still for phone to work).
    At this point in time thou, I still can't find a compelling reason to get one.
    Anyone who is going to drop some serious cash on a watch for fashion isn't even going to consider a techy watch. They are going to get something mechanical that can be passed down to grandchildren. What's the shelf life of these watches? A couple years?

    I think it would have to replace a phone to be compelling - and that tech is at least 10 years away.


    The only advantage of a iPhone is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use ApplePay without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to read and respond to text messages without taking my phone out of my pocket is a little bit of convenience. Being able to answer my iPhone when I left it in another room is a little bit of convenience. Being able to use "Hey Siri" to turn on/off lights in my home is a little bit of convenience. At some point all of the "little bit of convenience" adds up to a large amount of usefulness. I am 76 years old and fitness is not a major concern (but my doctor says it should be) but being able to do these other things is very nice.
    That is really it.  There are a number of functions which add up to an enjoyable user experience for me - but not any one "killer app".  Little things like timers and alarms which go off with a vibration but no sound, so it only alerts me without interrupting others.  Navigation left / right turns with taptic only.  Using Apple Pay on the watch multiple times every day (flip out the arm at the drive through...no need to dig into pockets for watch or phone).  Seeing the temperature, or next meeting, at a glance.  I am not a fitness junky, but greatly appreciate seeing how many active calories I am working through each day, and it helps to motivate to exercise more.

    I've had an Apple Watch for over a year now and go through a drive through about once a week, but I have never paid with my watch.  So I'm curious how it works.  Does the cashier hold something out, or would I be reaching into the drive through window?  I think the fact that I'm left handed, with my watch on my right wrist makes this a less appealing option.  Do they have drive throughs in the UK, where presumably right handed people are at a disadvantage?
    Yeah, wearing the AW on the right wrist definitely would make that a challenge:)  Where I am, all of the drive throughs have card readers on cables.  Since most people have chip & pin cards, they always hand the terminal out, even when the 'tap' is available.  When they do hand it out, I just reach the left wrist over on top of the terminal and "bing", it is done.  I never grab the terminal myself - the cashier just holds it.  There are probably only 4-5 fast food / cafes where I use the drive-thru, and all take Apple Pay like that.  Seriously convenient not to have to get either phone or wallet out.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 49
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,540member
    ...
    While I have no real desire to see them separate the watch from the phone, I think the watch has immense potential for expansion.   Particularly, but not limited to:  new sensors such as glucose and oxygenation sensors, and enhanced exercise monitoring as well as a low-energy watch face for increased 'always on' mode.   On the last, I think Apple needs to stop favoring/relying on Nike and support and encourage high end apps to better utilize the full capabilities of the watch -- many have not yet taken advantage of the watch's full capabilities...

    I am very optimistic of the watch's future.  As Apple's first new post-Jobs product, I think they will give it their best shot.

    IMO, the best way to address the advanced health sensors is via "smart bands", to which we have seen some patent data from Apple.  This separation of functionality allows the band to go through necessary certifications, but not the watch itself.  The bands could hold sensors at different points on the wrist for more accuracy, or different sensors, along with additional battery storage.  Apple already has the "smart connector" concept on iPad Pro were both power and data can be provided, and that concept can work within the band attachment points of today (on a new model of Watch).  A simple "battery band" in a link-style band would be a huge seller on its own, so really hoping Apple goes down this route.

    I originally thought I would never want LTE either on my watch, until I got AirPods. For things like Skiing/Mountain Biking, to not have to carry my phone at all and have access to Apple Music/Spotify would be great! 
    Agree.  LTE on the AW is not meant to replace having a phone, but rather allowing some more freedom to be connected or obtain cloud services, without having to carry the iPhone around all the time.  This is why it doesn't have to adapt all of the cellular standards (LTE only - no need for GSM/CDMA voice, nor 3G services - which can reduce the cost to Apple and us:).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 49
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,356member
    brucemc said:
    ...
    While I have no real desire to see them separate the watch from the phone, I think the watch has immense potential for expansion.   Particularly, but not limited to:  new sensors such as glucose and oxygenation sensors, and enhanced exercise monitoring as well as a low-energy watch face for increased 'always on' mode.   On the last, I think Apple needs to stop favoring/relying on Nike and support and encourage high end apps to better utilize the full capabilities of the watch -- many have not yet taken advantage of the watch's full capabilities...

    I am very optimistic of the watch's future.  As Apple's first new post-Jobs product, I think they will give it their best shot.

    IMO, the best way to address the advanced health sensors is via "smart bands", to which we have seen some patent data from Apple.  This separation of functionality allows the band to go through necessary certifications, but not the watch itself.  The bands could hold sensors at different points on the wrist for more accuracy, or different sensors, along with additional battery storage.  Apple already has the "smart connector" concept on iPad Pro were both power and data can be provided, and that concept can work within the band attachment points of today (on a new model of Watch).  A simple "battery band" in a link-style band would be a huge seller on its own, so really hoping Apple goes down this route.

    I originally thought I would never want LTE either on my watch, until I got AirPods. For things like Skiing/Mountain Biking, to not have to carry my phone at all and have access to Apple Music/Spotify would be great! 
    Agree.  LTE on the AW is not meant to replace having a phone, but rather allowing some more freedom to be connected or obtain cloud services, without having to carry the iPhone around all the time.  This is why it doesn't have to adapt all of the cellular standards (LTE only - no need for GSM/CDMA voice, nor 3G services - which can reduce the cost to Apple and us:).
    And if you're in an are that doesn't have LTE service you then lose your connection? The older techs are currently the cheapest, smallest, and lowest-power aspects of cellular radios. Maybe in the future Qualcomm's patents will be less of an issue that I can see not including LTE in favor of a '5G' tech, but I don't see that happening in the near future.
  • Reply 36 of 49
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,780member
    I originally thought I would never want LTE either on my watch, until I got AirPods. For things like Skiing/Mountain Biking, to not have to carry my phone at all and have access to Apple Music/Spotify would be great! The longer I wear the watch the more I miss it when its not on my wrist, as an example even just waking up in the morning making coffee, I look down at my wrist automatically to check notifications and even just turn my Sonos Music on and I don't have it on yet, its all the little convinces that add up like others have said. Im happy I bought the Sport Model first gen, as the 2nd Gen was a huge upgrade regarding speed so now I have the Stainless Black. The first gen was just too slow I think Apple could have waited even longer for Series 2 to be the first model. Looks wise I fine the Stainless Models much more attractive, just the polished steel looks much more like a real watch especially with the metal or leather bands I think they look pretty nice, you just have to be will to pay. Also the main killer App will be Apple Pay along with he health functions as they advance more in the future for sure. The US is finally accepting NFC I'd say 80% where I go, unheard of two years ago, now if just all restaurants can accept Apple pay where in business.
    The original generation was only slow because of the OS.  Once they upgraded everything to Watch OS3, the original and series 1 & 2 are all pretty much comparable in speed for most functions.  
    I wouldnt go far. My Series 0 on watchOS 3 is not fast by any means. Apps still take far to long to initialize, show a spinner, etc, even if they're in my Favorites tray. Using a Series 2 is noticeably faster.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 37 of 49

    Agree with all the postings here, so many conveniences.. I love my Apple Watch. A couple things I haven't seen mentioned yet:

    -adjusting music and answering calls/messages while I'm in the shower

    -using the official Apple Watch stand, which turns it into a very convenient nightlight, which turns off after a few seconds, but is activated by motion, so if I wake up in the middle of the night all I have to do is tap the mattress and it automatically shows the time. One minor gripe: it would be nice if there was a way to dim the nightlight brightness in the settings.

    watto_cobraGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 38 of 49
    mmatzmmatz Posts: 17member
    Mine is a version 0, which I may replace with the next version.  But I'm not pining for a better watch, because this one works really, really well for the most part.
    I was pleased to discover not long ago that Apple Pay evidently works without having my phone.  Went to the grocery store, realized I'd forgotten my phone, and decided to give it a try anyway.  It worked!
    Another pleasant discovery was that the music complication on the watch face shows (via the little circle) how long a song has to play even when I'm playing music through my car's Sync system.
    As several folks here have said, it's a lot of little conveniences that add up.  I agree, the Watch is the killer app.
    GeorgeBMacSoli
  • Reply 39 of 49
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,263member
    I originally thought I would never want LTE either on my watch, until I got AirPods. For things like Skiing/Mountain Biking, to not have to carry my phone at all and have access to Apple Music/Spotify would be great! The longer I wear the watch the more I miss it when its not on my wrist, as an example even just waking up in the morning making coffee, I look down at my wrist automatically to check notifications and even just turn my Sonos Music on and I don't have it on yet, its all the little convinces that add up like others have said. Im happy I bought the Sport Model first gen, as the 2nd Gen was a huge upgrade regarding speed so now I have the Stainless Black. The first gen was just too slow I think Apple could have waited even longer for Series 2 to be the first model. Looks wise I fine the Stainless Models much more attractive, just the polished steel looks much more like a real watch especially with the metal or leather bands I think they look pretty nice, you just have to be will to pay. Also the main killer App will be Apple Pay along with he health functions as they advance more in the future for sure. The US is finally accepting NFC I'd say 80% where I go, unheard of two years ago, now if just all restaurants can accept Apple pay where in business.
    The original generation was only slow because of the OS.  Once they upgraded everything to Watch OS3, the original and series 1 & 2 are all pretty much comparable in speed for most functions.  
    I wouldnt go far. My Series 0 on watchOS 3 is not fast by any means. Apps still take far to long to initialize, show a spinner, etc, even if they're in my Favorites tray. Using a Series 2 is noticeably faster.
    That's curious.  You should maybe have it checked.   Mine is fast to the point of being virtually instant in all but one exercise tracking app.  That app (I believe) is slow because it continuously syncs with the health app on the phone to get  GPS and heart rate data (the app needs to be updated) -- but that's not the fault of the watch
  • Reply 40 of 49
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,263member
    brucemc said:
    ...
    While I have no real desire to see them separate the watch from the phone, I think the watch has immense potential for expansion.   Particularly, but not limited to:  new sensors such as glucose and oxygenation sensors, and enhanced exercise monitoring as well as a low-energy watch face for increased 'always on' mode.   On the last, I think Apple needs to stop favoring/relying on Nike and support and encourage high end apps to better utilize the full capabilities of the watch -- many have not yet taken advantage of the watch's full capabilities...

    I am very optimistic of the watch's future.  As Apple's first new post-Jobs product, I think they will give it their best shot.

    IMO, the best way to address the advanced health sensors is via "smart bands", to which we have seen some patent data from Apple.  This separation of functionality allows the band to go through necessary certifications, but not the watch itself.  The bands could hold sensors at different points on the wrist for more accuracy, or different sensors, along with additional battery storage.  Apple already has the "smart connector" concept on iPad Pro were both power and data can be provided, and that concept can work within the band attachment points of today (on a new model of Watch).  A simple "battery band" in a link-style band would be a huge seller on its own, so really hoping Apple goes down this route.

    Actually the Apple Watch may already have that "smart connector":  there is a mysterious "diagnostic port" under the band's attachment point that not even the techs at the Apple Store are able or allowed to use...

    But I TOTALLY agree on the "smart bands" and the link-style band that you suggest.
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