Verizon debuts unlimited data plan for prepaid customers

Posted:
in iPhone edited April 2017
Verizon on Monday introduced a new unlimited data tier for prepaid customers, with the plan adding to the mobile carrier's four capped options.




Announced through the company's website, the unlimited prepaid plan costs $80 and features all you can eat talk, text and data. Like postpaid plans, the new offering includes unlimited talk to Mexico and Canada, as well as unlimited texting to over 200 international markets.

Similar to unlimited plans from T-Mobile, Verizon's prepaid service limits video streams to 480p resolutions. Mobile hotspot and tethering are also not included as part of the product terms, and user data access might be prioritized behind other customers depending on network conditions.

"In just months, Verizon has transformed its prepaid offerings to make it easier and more affordable for customers to get access to the best network at a great value, no matter how much data they need," said Tami Erwin, executive vice president of operations for Verizon. "This plan is all about giving our prepaid customers more choice."

The introduction of Verizon's unlimited prepaid tier comes months after the firm debuted 5GB and 10GB data plans priced at $50 and $70 per month, respectively. Verizon also offers a 3GB tier for $45 a month, 6GB for $60 a month, and a basic talk and text plan for $30 per month.

Verizon's prepaid unlimited plan is positioned alongside the carrier's Verizon Unlimited postpaid option, which was resurrected in February. Also priced at $80 per month, the subscription version includes mobile hotspot and tethering capabilities with a cap of 10GB, as well as higher bitrate video streaming.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    LMAO @ "features all you can eat talk, text and data."
  • Reply 2 of 23
    Ugly building.  Is that their corporate headquarters?
  • Reply 3 of 23
    2old4fun2old4fun Posts: 221member
    Dirty company, dirty building.
    redgeminipa
  • Reply 4 of 23
    What's up with the Verizon hate?  They're as good as anyone in the industry.  But, I went with T-Mobile because of price/value.

    Regarding the building: Isn't that scaffolding?  It's probably under construction, though I agree it's not attractive.
    ronn
  • Reply 5 of 23
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Regarding the building: Isn't that scaffolding?
    Pretty sure they’re talking about the streaks of what they assume to be filth running down the taupe concrete facade.
  • Reply 6 of 23
    sergiozsergioz Posts: 235member
    "user data access might be prioritized behind other customers depending on network conditions."<-- I wonder how that works?
  • Reply 7 of 23
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    sergioz said:
    "user data access might be prioritized behind other customers depending on network conditions."<-- I wonder how that works?
    “Oh, you’re a cheapskate; throttled 24/7, then. Should have bought one of our real plans!” 
    redgeminipajblongz
  • Reply 8 of 23
    jvmbjvmb Posts: 59member
    I don't understand why prepaid customers get less (no thethering) than post paid customers. Most busineses want to get paid as early as possible. Getting paid before providing the service rather than a month later would be better for business. 
    ronn
  • Reply 9 of 23
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    jvmb said:
    Most busineses want to get paid as early as possible. Getting paid before providing the service rather than a month later would be better for business. 
    Harder to get someone to cough up more money after they paid (and went over their allotment) than to charge them only after you know what they used.
  • Reply 10 of 23
    macseekermacseeker Posts: 439member
    What's up with the Verizon hate?  They're as good as anyone in the industry.  But, I went with T-Mobile because of price/value.

    Regarding the building: Isn't that scaffolding?  It's probably under construction, though I agree it's not attractive.
    I'm just making a comment on the building in the article.  I think AppleInsider could have found a better picture.
  • Reply 11 of 23
    anomeanome Posts: 1,279member
    Have they got a similar offering for their MiFi hotspots? I have one I bought last time I was in the US, and not having to top up data would be great. (Yeah, I should probably cut down on the data I use when travelling, too...)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 23
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,415member
    Harder to get someone to cough up more money after they paid (and went over their allotment) than to charge them only after you know what they used.
    Sorry, but I can't see where it makes sense that it's harder to get them to cough up more after coughing up something,
    than to get them to cough up lots more after enjoying coughing up nothing...
    As has been pointed out, cash in hand is cash that can be earning,
    and that's always sure to warm the cockles of any businessperson's "heart"...
  • Reply 13 of 23
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    boredumb said:
    Sorry, but I can’t see where it makes sense that it's harder to get them to cough up more after coughing up something, than to get them to cough up lots more after enjoying coughing up nothing...
    This is the fast food vs. real food argument, but we already know how that one works out.
  • Reply 14 of 23
    That isn't scaffolding. It's a catwalk going around the top of the building with multiple ladders for access to it. I wonder how many disgruntled employees have used that to see if they could fly... 
  • Reply 15 of 23
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    boredumb said:
    Harder to get someone to cough up more money after they paid (and went over their allotment) than to charge them only after you know what they used.
    Sorry, but I can't see where it makes sense that it's harder to get them to cough up more after coughing up something,
    than to get them to cough up lots more after enjoying coughing up nothing...
    As has been pointed out, cash in hand is cash that can be earning,
    and that's always sure to warm the cockles of any businessperson's "heart"...
    It could be simply that post-paid subscribers are more stable, ongoing customers whereas pre-paid are more come-and-go which incurs more administrative overhead to manage. Offering tethering may be the differentiater that encourages people to become more permanent subscribers. So while cash in-hand is good, a more reliable ongoing revenue stream is even better.
  • Reply 16 of 23
    macseeker said:
    Regarding the building: Isn't that scaffolding?  It's probably under construction, though I agree it's not attractive.
    I'm just making a comment on the building in the article.  I think AppleInsider could have found a better picture.
    I believe it's the Verizon headquarters in downtown New York by the World Trade Center. It's a dingy old building for sure. It's on the National Register of Historic Places (but not because the dirt is old). It was damaged in the 2001 terrorist attacks. This picture is probably from the time of exterior repairs from those attacks.
    edited April 2017
  • Reply 17 of 23
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,366member
    Competition is good. More choices benefits everyone. Keep it coming.

    That said, two things: 1. this plan isn't for me, no thank you; and 2. it seems like the telecoms think "competition" is best done by obfuscating what you get for your money. "If you pay this then, you'll have access to this, unless you don't, and these things that work if you use them properly. Oh, and tax and fees, because reasons." Yuck

    I'm tempted to switch to t-mobile just because they say "$100. Chow down."

  • Reply 18 of 23
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,161member
    macseeker said:
    Ugly building.  Is that their corporate headquarters?
    That is not Verizon headquarters in the picture. Their headquarters is a nice complex in New Jersey. Not sure where the picture is in the article. 
  • Reply 19 of 23
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,415member
    That is not Verizon headquarters in the picture. Their headquarters is a nice complex in New Jersey. Not sure where the picture is in the article. 
    It shouldn't be that hard to track down...Albert Speer can't have designed that many of Verizon's facilities.
    anome
  • Reply 20 of 23
    anomeanome Posts: 1,279member
    boredumb said:
    That is not Verizon headquarters in the picture. Their headquarters is a nice complex in New Jersey. Not sure where the picture is in the article. 
    It shouldn't be that hard to track down...Albert Speer can't have designed that many of Verizon's facilities.
    I knew the architecture looked familiar. Sort of Speer via the 70s Brutalists (the dirty concrete is a key element of Brutalist architecture, apparently).
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