Apple's Tim Cook says company aiding in UK terrorism investigations

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple is helping the U.K. government in its investigations of recent terrorist attacks, CEO Tim Cook acknowledged in a TV interview, adding that the company's preference for encryption doesn't mean it lacks information it can share with authorities.




"We have been cooperating with the U.K. government not only in law enforcement kind of matters but on some of the attacks," the executive told Bloomberg. "I cannot speak on detail on that. But in cases when we have information and they have gone through the lawful process we don't just give it but we do it very promptly."

The U.K. has been hit by three Islamist-related attacks in less than three months, most recently an incident in London in which three men plowed a van through pedestrians on London Bridge, then leapt out and began stabbing people in nearby Borough Market before being shot dead by police.

Cook and Apple have often tried to strike a fine line on privacy matters. The company says that it's fully compliant with legitimate warrants and national security letters, but also defends the of use measures like end-to-end encryption, which police and spy agencies have complained can make it difficult or impossible to access some data, such as iMessage content.

"It doesn't mean no information," Cook said in the interview. "Metadata exists and that's very important for building a profile."

Metadata consists of the information surrounding internet traffic, such as senders, recipients, and timestamps for communications. By linking enough pieces of metadata, it can be possible to establish patterns and identities even without reading messages.

Cook separately commented on his decision not to participate in U.S. President Donald Trump's business advisory councils, arguing such groups aren't "terribly productive."

He did say, however, that we will keep advising the President on other issues, such as the Paris climate accord. Trump last week promised to pull the U.S. out of the agreement, despite wide political and scientific consensus, and pressure from business leaders like Cook.

"He didn't decide what I wanted him to decide," Cook remarked. "He decided wrong. It's not in the best interest of the United States what he decided."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,411member
    Hmmm...well, all right.
    But it does make me a bit uneasy that he refers to "a preference for encryption"...
    I'd have preferred "an insistence upon encryption", or, "a principle of encryption".
    Characterizing it as merely "a preference" seems a bit of a step back, toward a possible, eventual, capitulation...
  • Reply 2 of 12
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    boredumb said:
    Hmmm...well, all right.
    But it does make me a bit uneasy that he refers to "a preference for encryption"...
    I'd have preferred "an insistence upon encryption", or, "a principle of encryption".
    Characterizing it as merely "a preference" seems a bit of a step back, toward a possible, eventual, capitulation...
    Wonder Woman couldn't have made that leap. 
  • Reply 3 of 12
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,197administrator
    Regarding this thread, and the active climate change one. They are open on the main page as experiments, to see if you can be cool to each other after the time-out last week.

    Keep on topic, no ad hominem, and be excellent to each other.
    edited June 2017 pscooter63lostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 12
    vision33rvision33r Posts: 210member
    And Apple wouldn't aid the FBI with unlocking the San Bernardino mass shooter case.  
  • Reply 5 of 12
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,197administrator
    vision33r said:
    And Apple wouldn't aid the FBI with unlocking the San Bernardino mass shooter case.  
    No, nor did they here. What they did do, in both cases, is give information that the company had.

    Read the article, please.
    macxpresswatto_cobramacgui
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    vision33r said:
    And Apple wouldn't aid the FBI with unlocking the San Bernardino mass shooter case.  
    Er, no.  

    What Apple wouldn't do was help the FBI unlock everybody's phone, then field the flak when the FBI lose the key to everyone's phone, and then get sued to high heaven for giving the FBI the means to ensure that every iPhone user can get robbed blind by unscrupulous hackers. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 12
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,734member
    This is one hell of a statement by Cook:
    "He didn't decide what I wanted him to decide," Cook remarked. "He decided wrong. It's not in the best interest of the United States what he decided."

    "He didn't decide what I wanted him to decide"? "He decided wrong"?

    No, Tim. Trump is the one who was elected and is now responsible for making presidential decisions. You (Tim) may disagree, but perhaps you are wrong. If you believe you can do better, quit Apple and run for office (and I honestly believe this is what Tim is planning to do, since he is being seen more and more around politicians).

    edited June 2017 boltsfan17
  • Reply 8 of 12
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,760member
    vision33r said:
    And Apple wouldn't aid the FBI with unlocking the San Bernardino mass shooter case.  
    Read the article, not just the headline please....then edit your post accordingly.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 12
    viclauyycviclauyyc Posts: 335member
    Islamist-related attack.   Very accurate words. Good job Roger
    edited June 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 12
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,648member
    Did they say in the Keynote that iMessages are kept in the Cloud?    Does the FBI or CIA or M5 or Scotland Yard get access to it?
    What then on an iPhone is private and secure?
  • Reply 11 of 12
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    k2kw said:
    Did they say in the Keynote that iMessages are kept in the Cloud?    Does the FBI or CIA or M5 or Scotland Yard get access to it?
    What then on an iPhone is private and secure?
    What Craig ('the hair') said was that iMessages will be stored encrypted on the cloud.

    They can't be decrypted by Apple. 
  • Reply 12 of 12
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,114member
    This is one hell of a statement by Cook:
    "He didn't decide what I wanted him to decide," Cook remarked. "He decided wrong. It's not in the best interest of the United States what he decided."

    "He didn't decide what I wanted him to decide"? "He decided wrong"?

    No, Tim. Trump is the one who was elected and is now responsible for making presidential decisions. You (Tim) may disagree, but perhaps you are wrong. If you believe you can do better, quit Apple and run for office (and I honestly believe this is what Tim is planning to do, since he is being seen more and more around politicians).

    Being elected President and having the right to make a/the decision doesn't make any decision right. It just makes it a Presidential decision. He's made several bad decisions so far. Nothing about him holding office made those decisions right.

    Trump made the wrong decision again as Cook observed. Perhaps you are wrong. 
    stourque
Sign In or Register to comment.