It doesn't matter that Apple's 'iPhone 8' may not support 4G Gigabit LTE or 5G

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    steven n. said:
    gatorguy said:
    steven n. said:
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    If you read the article you could have saved yourself lots of time. Given most websites and internet infrastructure can't handle LTE bandwidth, Gigabit LTE makes the largest pipe bigger but the small pipes limit transfer rates. 
    I didn't need to rely solely on the AI article as I've done a fair bit of reading as of late. Here's  a discussion of actual usage in Australia where real 4G Gigabit networks are live and available. Save yourself some time and read the article I've linked for you before claiming it can't be done.
    http://cellularinsights.com/telstras-gigabit-class-lte-network-the-work-of-art/
    I never said it can't be done. Read what I wrote. It doesn't really matter in the broadest sense given the primary backbone doesn't support these pipes. Even the docutisement you linked to showed data rates far below gigabit speeds even though they were gushing at the seems. I also question if "everyday" tasks are grander if massive multi gigabyte file using your cell phone. Those are exceptions to the everyday activity. 
    It doesn't matter in the broadest sense right now? Well on that we agree. 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 22 of 66
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,037member
    Apple is feeling the pressure.  The army of Android phone manufacturers are upping the hardware specs here and there. Apple releases two models each year.  Apple cannot put all the advanced components in two iPhones.  This gives Android phones bragging right of beating iPhone, Maybe Apple needs to announce more than two new iPhones each year? 
    brucemc
  • Reply 23 of 66
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,673member
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    When a headline pops up on the CNBC ticker on TV at 8AM, saying that Apple's speed throttling of 4G Gigabit LTE and 5G in the next iPhone is what's causing the stock slide, you'd better believe it's about both.

    Face, a analysis finally happened onto some FUD that stuck to the wall and the market it reacting to it. How much FUD came out before this and nothing budge the stock, This hit last week along with the whole tech sector being hammer and it is driving the stock down. The analysis needed to go down since it was holding at one price too long, since they know it would not go up, it is far easier to drive it down and short it along the way. They just made money for their client who they convince to sell and got them to buy in on shorts.
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 24 of 66
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,965administrator
    Okay, here's some practical data for you, culled from the local area. In the Washington DC area, there are eight whole cell towers that support 4G Gigabit LTE on T-Mobile. If you live within about 200 yards from one of those towers, you MIGHT be able to pick it up and get the speeds it promises, but realistically, that's about a 100 yard radius circle, based on propagation drop-off over distance and obstacles.

    There MIGHT be another five towers before the end of 2017 in the area. The metro area spans 5560 square miles.

    Sure. It'll matter to those people in those areas, maybe. And, keep in mind that I clearly said that at some point in the future it would be important. It's just not relevant for even half of the iPhone customers in the US for the next two years, at least.
    edited June 2017 tmaynetmagepscooter63brucemc
  • Reply 25 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    tzeshan said:
    Apple is feeling the pressure.  The army of Android phone manufacturers are upping the hardware specs here and there. Apple releases two models each year.  Apple cannot put all the advanced components in two iPhones.  This gives Android phones bragging right of beating iPhone, Maybe Apple needs to announce more than two new iPhones each year? 
    That does raise one possible marketing angle that I hadn't considered until just now. IF (big) Apple hasn't settled with Qualcomm by fall, and I won't be surprised if they do, and IF (a bit smaller)Apple decides not to enable 4G Gigabit for that reason then those telcos wanting to promote their "impressively faster Gigabit networks" this year and next will feature handsets that can showcase it. That would include any handset using Qualcomm's 835 processor. 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 26 of 66
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,077member
    melgross said:
    This is essentially what I've been saying for a while now. At this point, it's just marketing. By the time we get "the real thing", the iPhone 8 and 7s models, assuming that's what they call them, will be 3 years old, and counting.

    even so, getting an actual GHz/s download speed will be almost impossible. Wired networks get what you expect, but wireless does not. I get about 910 down and 940 up with my FIOS 940/880 connection. That slightly lower down, and a large amount more going back up. It's pretty good, from Ethernet. But I get less than half over WiFi right next to the primary router. My iPad Pro 12.9 can do better, but WiFi can't. LTE is even worse. The best I've every gotten is about 45MHz/s on my iPhone 7+, no matter where I am.

    That's completely untrue.  It's not realistically possible now.  It will become possible, likely, and then standard at some point.  The only question is when.  10 years ago, people were luck to get 5mbs from their smartphones.  My FIOS was 20mbs.  Now it's 50, and that's the bottom plan.  My iPhone 7+ just pulled over 80mbs over AT&T LTE...twice, at peak afternoon times (less than 15 upload).  I would say, somewhat cautiously that we'll have gigabit wireless phone network speeds within 5-7 years.  
  • Reply 27 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    Okay, here's some practical data for you, culled from the local area. In the Washington DC area, there are eight whole cell towers that support 4G Gigabit LTE on T-Mobile. If you live within about 200 yards from one of those towers, you MIGHT be able to pick it up and get the speeds it promises, but realistically, that's about a 100 yard radius circle, based on propagation drop-off over distance and obstacles.

    There MIGHT be another five towers before the end of 2017 in the area. The metro area spans 5560 square miles.

    Sure. It'll matter to those people in those areas, maybe. And, keep in mind that I clearly said that at some point in the future it would be important. It's just not relevant for even half of the iPhone customers in the US for the next two years, at least.
    You could well be right, so I'd tend to agree with you. 
  • Reply 28 of 66
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,957member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    When a headline pops up on the CNBC ticker on TV at 8AM, saying that Apple's speed throttling of 4G Gigabit LTE and 5G in the next iPhone is what's causing the stock slide, you'd better believe it's about both.
    Well it would actually be impossible for Apple to throttle anything related to 5G even if they wanted/needed to SINCE IT DOESN'T EXIST, so repeating something that's plainly not true simply confuses the issue that is. The article as written invites misunderstandings IMO. 

    Now does that mean I think it's a potential issue for most folks? Just as I intimated earlier, NOPE  it really won't matter for most of 'em at least most of the time, but not for the reasons implied in the AI article. Faster 4G Gigabit LTE will be available and ready to use in a number of larger worldwide markets including many in the US within the next several months and any smartphone utilizing Qualcomm's 835 processor or X16 modem (the 835 has it integrated) will be able to take advantage of an available network. Heck it's live now in some markets. 
    I believe we covered the "it doesn't exist" in the U.S. part.
    Neither does the next-gen iPhone or the rumored throttling. Both are just rumors at this point. But by the time the new iPhones start shipping out there will be 4G Gigabit LTE networks here unless the US carriers experience some major disaster this year. 
    Except... as we discussed elsewhere, gigabit doesn't matter, since no one will ever get those speeds. So it doesn't matter. If, as expected, the Intel radios will do 450, then that's enough! Why, because no will get those speeds either, so whatever radios Apple use, they will get the SAME real world max speeds.

    man, this is getting tiring.
    edited June 2017 netmagepscooter63
  • Reply 29 of 66
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,957member
    Okay, here's some practical data for you, culled from the local area. In the Washington DC area, there are eight whole cell towers that support 4G Gigabit LTE on T-Mobile. If you live within about 200 yards from one of those towers, you MIGHT be able to pick it up and get the speeds it promises, but realistically, that's about a 100 yard radius circle, based on propagation drop-off over distance and obstacles.

    There MIGHT be another five towers before the end of 2017 in the area. The metro area spans 5560 square miles.

    Sure. It'll matter to those people in those areas, maybe. And, keep in mind that I clearly said that at some point in the future it would be important. It's just not relevant for even half of the iPhone customers in the US for the next two years, at least.
    I'm willing to bet that, realistically, that it won't matter at all to most people, and that most of them are so clueless, that, even if it did work the way some are saying, that they wont notice, even if they do have it.

    at some point, increased speeds don't matter that much.
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 30 of 66
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,979member
    gatorguy said:
    tzeshan said:
    Apple is feeling the pressure.  The army of Android phone manufacturers are upping the hardware specs here and there. Apple releases two models each year.  Apple cannot put all the advanced components in two iPhones.  This gives Android phones bragging right of beating iPhone, Maybe Apple needs to announce more than two new iPhones each year? 
    That does raise one possible marketing angle that I hadn't considered until just now. IF (big) Apple hasn't settled with Qualcomm by fall, and I won't be surprised if they do, and IF (a bit smaller)Apple decides not to enable 4G Gigabit for that reason then those telcos wanting to promote their "impressively faster Gigabit networks" this year and next will feature handsets that can showcase it. That would include any handset using Qualcomm's 835 processor. 
    I pointed out the potential marketing aspect in an earlier post, and for the record, some Android OS phones are always beating Apple in implementing some feature earlier, though often badly implemented.

    I don't know what Apple has planned for the iPhone 8, but cellular data bandwidth isn't going to be the halo feature anyway. That it might be for Samsung and others is wonderful, but ultimately, isn't going to have a long term effect on the market.

    Better Android users suffer the early teething problems of network upgrades than iOS users.

  • Reply 31 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    When a headline pops up on the CNBC ticker on TV at 8AM, saying that Apple's speed throttling of 4G Gigabit LTE and 5G in the next iPhone is what's causing the stock slide, you'd better believe it's about both.
    Well it would actually be impossible for Apple to throttle anything related to 5G even if they wanted/needed to SINCE IT DOESN'T EXIST, so repeating something that's plainly not true simply confuses the issue that is. The article as written invites misunderstandings IMO. 

    Now does that mean I think it's a potential issue for most folks? Just as I intimated earlier, NOPE  it really won't matter for most of 'em at least most of the time, but not for the reasons implied in the AI article. Faster 4G Gigabit LTE will be available and ready to use in a number of larger worldwide markets including many in the US within the next several months and any smartphone utilizing Qualcomm's 835 processor or X16 modem (the 835 has it integrated) will be able to take advantage of an available network. Heck it's live now in some markets. 
    I believe we covered the "it doesn't exist" in the U.S. part.
    Neither does the next-gen iPhone or the rumored throttling. Both are just rumors at this point. But by the time the new iPhones start shipping out there will be 4G Gigabit LTE networks here unless the US carriers experience some major disaster this year. 
    Except... as we discussed elsewhere, gigabit doesn't matter, since no one will ever get those speeds. So it doesn't matter. If, as expected, the Intel radios will do 450, then that's enough! Why, because no will get those speeds either, so whatever radios Apple use, they will get the SAME real world max speeds.

    man, this is getting tiring.
    The Intel modems won't do 450, or even 300. Why? The Intel modems capable of supporting 4G Gigabit won't be ready in time, But they are coming so other companies might choose to use them later on. 
  • Reply 32 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    When a headline pops up on the CNBC ticker on TV at 8AM, saying that Apple's speed throttling of 4G Gigabit LTE and 5G in the next iPhone is what's causing the stock slide, you'd better believe it's about both.
    Well it would actually be impossible for Apple to throttle anything related to 5G even if they wanted/needed to SINCE IT DOESN'T EXIST, so repeating something that's plainly not true simply confuses the issue that is. The article as written invites misunderstandings IMO. 

    Now does that mean I think it's a potential issue for most folks? Just as I intimated earlier, NOPE  it really won't matter for most of 'em at least most of the time, but not for the reasons implied in the AI article. Faster 4G Gigabit LTE will be available and ready to use in a number of larger worldwide markets including many in the US within the next several months and any smartphone utilizing Qualcomm's 835 processor or X16 modem (the 835 has it integrated) will be able to take advantage of an available network. Heck it's live now in some markets. 
    I believe we covered the "it doesn't exist" in the U.S. part.
    Neither does the next-gen iPhone or the rumored throttling. Both are just rumors at this point. But by the time the new iPhones start shipping out there will be 4G Gigabit LTE networks here unless the US carriers experience some major disaster this year. 
    Except... as we discussed elsewhere, gigabit doesn't matter, since no one will ever get those speeds. So it doesn't matter. If, as expected, the Intel radios will do 450, then that's enough! Why, because no will get those speeds either, so whatever radios Apple use, they will get the SAME real world max speeds.

    man, this is getting tiring.
    Perhaps because you're finding you didn't have the handle on it you thought you did and have to do more reading than expected?  ;)
  • Reply 33 of 66
    tzm41tzm41 Posts: 88member

    It doesn't matter that Apple's 'iPhone 8' may not support 4G Gigabit LTE or 5G


    Very strong statement, but simply untrue. Telecom tech adoption might be slow in the US, but do you think of how many iPhones Apple sells in Australia, Japan, UK, Korea, etc? Those regions with smaller area and higher population density will adopt 4G Gigabit LTE much sooner than US. The internet and wireless speed in Japan and Korea has been putting us in shame for quite a while.
  • Reply 34 of 66
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,957member
    tmay said:
    gatorguy said:
    tzeshan said:
    Apple is feeling the pressure.  The army of Android phone manufacturers are upping the hardware specs here and there. Apple releases two models each year.  Apple cannot put all the advanced components in two iPhones.  This gives Android phones bragging right of beating iPhone, Maybe Apple needs to announce more than two new iPhones each year? 
    That does raise one possible marketing angle that I hadn't considered until just now. IF (big) Apple hasn't settled with Qualcomm by fall, and I won't be surprised if they do, and IF (a bit smaller)Apple decides not to enable 4G Gigabit for that reason then those telcos wanting to promote their "impressively faster Gigabit networks" this year and next will feature handsets that can showcase it. That would include any handset using Qualcomm's 835 processor. 
    I pointed out the potential marketing aspect in an earlier post, and for the record, some Android OS phones are always beating Apple in implementing some feature earlier, though often badly implemented.

    I don't know what Apple has planned for the iPhone 8, but cellular data bandwidth isn't going to be the halo feature anyway. That it might be for Samsung and others is wonderful, but ultimately, isn't going to have a long term effect on the market.

    Better Android users suffer the early teething problems of network upgrades than iOS users.

    What I just find amusing, is that pretty much nobody will see an advantage between either radio. So, Qualcomm's is supposed to hit 1GHz this year, vs 450 for Intel's. But, it's not likely that anyone will even get 450, so it doesn't really matter.
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 35 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    melgross said:
    tmay said:
    gatorguy said:
    tzeshan said:
    Apple is feeling the pressure.  The army of Android phone manufacturers are upping the hardware specs here and there. Apple releases two models each year.  Apple cannot put all the advanced components in two iPhones.  This gives Android phones bragging right of beating iPhone, Maybe Apple needs to announce more than two new iPhones each year? 
    That does raise one possible marketing angle that I hadn't considered until just now. IF (big) Apple hasn't settled with Qualcomm by fall, and I won't be surprised if they do, and IF (a bit smaller)Apple decides not to enable 4G Gigabit for that reason then those telcos wanting to promote their "impressively faster Gigabit networks" this year and next will feature handsets that can showcase it. That would include any handset using Qualcomm's 835 processor. 
    I pointed out the potential marketing aspect in an earlier post, and for the record, some Android OS phones are always beating Apple in implementing some feature earlier, though often badly implemented.

    I don't know what Apple has planned for the iPhone 8, but cellular data bandwidth isn't going to be the halo feature anyway. That it might be for Samsung and others is wonderful, but ultimately, isn't going to have a long term effect on the market.

    Better Android users suffer the early teething problems of network upgrades than iOS users.

    What I just find amusing, is that pretty much nobody will see an advantage between either radio. So, Qualcomm's is supposed to hit 1GHz this year, vs 450 for Intel's. But, it's not likely that anyone will even get 450, so it doesn't really matter.
    The currently available Intel modem, and the one Apple will almost certainly need to use (or one very similar to it) , won't be capable of accessing any carrier's 4G Gigabit network. No idea what makes you think the Intel modem will be hitting 450 even if the network might offer it. They can't utilize the faster network because the Intel modem hardware doesn't connect it. I'm guessing you're still reading up on what's actually going on. 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 36 of 66
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,965administrator
    tzm41 said:

    It doesn't matter that Apple's 'iPhone 8' may not support 4G Gigabit LTE or 5G


    Very strong statement, but simply untrue. Telecom tech adoption might be slow in the US, but do you think of how many iPhones Apple sells in Australia, Japan, UK, Korea, etc? Those regions with smaller area and higher population density will adopt 4G Gigabit LTE much sooner than US. The internet and wireless speed in Japan and Korea has been putting us in shame for quite a while.
    Not arguing that Aus, Japan, SK point, but the numbers of sales are an order of magnitude less than in the US.
    edited June 2017 netmage
  • Reply 37 of 66
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,198member
    I don't see what the big deal is if the iPhone doesn't support Gigabit LTE or 5G. This is the same scenario as when LTE first came out. Sure, Android phones supported LTE before the iPhone, but it was hardly even available anywhere. Once Gigaibt LTE and 5G become widely available, it's going to be supported on the iPhone.
  • Reply 38 of 66
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,957member
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    When a headline pops up on the CNBC ticker on TV at 8AM, saying that Apple's speed throttling of 4G Gigabit LTE and 5G in the next iPhone is what's causing the stock slide, you'd better believe it's about both.
    Well it would actually be impossible for Apple to throttle anything related to 5G even if they wanted/needed to SINCE IT DOESN'T EXIST, so repeating something that's plainly not true simply confuses the issue that is. The article as written invites misunderstandings IMO. 

    Now does that mean I think it's a potential issue for most folks? Just as I intimated earlier, NOPE  it really won't matter for most of 'em at least most of the time, but not for the reasons implied in the AI article. Faster 4G Gigabit LTE will be available and ready to use in a number of larger worldwide markets including many in the US within the next several months and any smartphone utilizing Qualcomm's 835 processor or X16 modem (the 835 has it integrated) will be able to take advantage of an available network. Heck it's live now in some markets. 
    I believe we covered the "it doesn't exist" in the U.S. part.
    Neither does the next-gen iPhone or the rumored throttling. Both are just rumors at this point. But by the time the new iPhones start shipping out there will be 4G Gigabit LTE networks here unless the US carriers experience some major disaster this year. 
    Except... as we discussed elsewhere, gigabit doesn't matter, since no one will ever get those speeds. So it doesn't matter. If, as expected, the Intel radios will do 450, then that's enough! Why, because no will get those speeds either, so whatever radios Apple use, they will get the SAME real world max speeds.

    man, this is getting tiring.
    The Intel modems won't do 450, or even 300. Why? The Intel modems capable of supporting 4G Gigabit won't be ready in time, But they are coming so other companies might choose to use them later on. 
    The ones coming out this year will do 450, that's what I've been reading about them.
  • Reply 39 of 66
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,225member
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    The discussion is a bit confusing at the moment. When did this become about 5G? AFAIK that's not even on the table for a couple more years. 4G Gigabit LTE on the other hand is a real thing, currently available to thousands of mobile handset users, and certainly expected to be more widely available before the 2018 iPhone models are ready to ship. Isn't that what the original news article that AI sourced referring to? While it's not any big deal if it takes a few seconds longer to download some particular file or media saying that it doesn't matter because the tech isn't ready isn't exactly true.

    Perhaps the Qualcomm throttling (if true to begin with) can be reinstituted with a simple software update, but that would might create another issue altogether with the expected Intel modem used in some number of iPhones incapable of utilizing 4G Gigabit no matter what. 
    When a headline pops up on the CNBC ticker on TV at 8AM, saying that Apple's speed throttling of 4G Gigabit LTE and 5G in the next iPhone is what's causing the stock slide, you'd better believe it's about both.
    Well it would actually be impossible for Apple to throttle anything related to 5G even if they wanted/needed to SINCE IT DOESN'T EXIST, so repeating something that's plainly not true simply confuses the issue that is. The article as written invites misunderstandings IMO. 

    Now does that mean I think it's a potential issue for most folks? Just as I intimated earlier, NOPE  it really won't matter for most of 'em at least most of the time, but not for the reasons implied in the AI article. Faster 4G Gigabit LTE will be available and ready to use in a number of larger worldwide markets including many in the US within the next several months and any smartphone utilizing Qualcomm's 835 processor or X16 modem (the 835 has it integrated) will be able to take advantage of an available network. Heck it's live now in some markets. 
    I believe we covered the "it doesn't exist" in the U.S. part.
    Neither does the next-gen iPhone or the rumored throttling. Both are just rumors at this point. But by the time the new iPhones start shipping out there will be 4G Gigabit LTE networks here unless the US carriers experience some major disaster this year. 
    Except... as we discussed elsewhere, gigabit doesn't matter, since no one will ever get those speeds. So it doesn't matter. If, as expected, the Intel radios will do 450, then that's enough! Why, because no will get those speeds either, so whatever radios Apple use, they will get the SAME real world max speeds.

    man, this is getting tiring.
    The Intel modems won't do 450, or even 300. Why? The Intel modems capable of supporting 4G Gigabit won't be ready in time, But they are coming so other companies might choose to use them later on. 
    The ones coming out this year will do 450, that's what I've been reading about them.
    Then you should also have read that Intel won't have a modem capable of using a 4G Gigabit network in time for Apple's iPhone. Even IF an Intel modem could deliver 450MB service it wouldn't matter one whit without a way to access a supporting network. Qualcomm's currently available 835 chipset or X16 modem can. Intel will not be able to in time for Apple's use. Why do you think there's been an ongoing discussion about throttling? 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 40 of 66
    If Apple thinks people are going to shell out $1000 for a new phone that isn't as fast as the Samsung phone that was released months ago then they need a new management team. Maybe a $80 billion dollar loss in market cap in two days of trading will clue them into how serious a problem this is. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that someone at Qualcomm is the source of the Bloomberg article, but regardless, Apple needs to fix this now!
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