Watch: Siri will translate for you in Apple's iOS 11

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in iPhone
Beginning this fall with iOS 11, Apple's voice-driven personal assistant, Siri, will gain the ability to translate to multiple foreign languages. Here's a peek at how it will work.






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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,644member
    Ok, that's great. Now, how accurate can we expect this to be? Other than a number of basically canned translations such as the "Where is the nearest coffee shop?, How are you?", etc., what can we expect?
  • Reply 2 of 21
    adm1adm1 Posts: 871member
    Is this translator baked into iOS 11 / Siri servers or does Siri just reference a 3rd party app?
  • Reply 3 of 21
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,463member
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    stantheman
  • Reply 4 of 21
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Google Translate is available on iphone. It can be used offline, can translate voice (mic) and text (camera). And translates more than 100 languages. Sorry to hear about your wife. It's awful to think anyone, no matter which language or culture, would be left helpless and lost
    stanthemangatorguy
  • Reply 5 of 21
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    macky the mackypatchythepirate
  • Reply 6 of 21
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,847member
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    I hear about these stories but I've never had anything other than pleasantness from the French (and pretty much every other culture that others say are rude to tourists or Americans).
    stompyStrangeDaysbonobob
  • Reply 7 of 21
    pepe779pepe779 Posts: 84member
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    I hear about these stories but I've never had anything other than pleasantness from the French (and pretty much every other culture that others say are rude to tourists or Americans).
    Well I'm from Europe and I can relate to what others wrote above - the French are exceptionally patriotic and can be a true pain to deal with when you're visiting their country and don't speak their language. I can speak from my own repeated experience and I have no desire to visit France ever again.
  • Reply 8 of 21
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 2,472moderator
    Gimingaw ko nimu Siri
  • Reply 9 of 21
    Gimingaw ko nimu Siri
    My hovercraft is full of eels.
    patchythepirateequality72521
  • Reply 10 of 21
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,463member
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    I hear about these stories but I've never had anything other than pleasantness from the French (and pretty much every other culture that others say are rude to tourists or Americans).
     Your comment makes me sound I'm making it up.  This wasn't a 'story'.  My wife phoned in tears and had be book her an earlier flight home. Oh and her wallet was stolen on the way to the airport.  We have travelled (heck and lived) in numerous countries and never had an issue either any place else, oh wait .. Montreal a similar experience and I was there, so again no 'story'. 

    BTW I lived for a few years in northern Spain, near the border, often popping over in France, and never had any issues with the French folks there.  My best friend of 40 years lives in central France and is English, no issues either.  It seems to be a problem in certain areas for some reason that baffles me.  You are very lucky and maybe you speak French?  As to Americans, never run across one in any country that wasn't very nice, many love the English for some strange reason lol.  The English abroad on the other hand, ever met football fans or tourists on the coast of the more 'popular' areas of the Costa Brava. OMG... lol (full disclosure I am dual English/American)
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 11 of 21
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,847member
    MacPro said:
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    I hear about these stories but I've never had anything other than pleasantness from the French (and pretty much every other culture that others say are rude to tourists or Americans).
     Your comment makes me sound I'm making it up.  This wasn't a 'story'.  My wife phoned in tears and had be book her an earlier flight home. Oh and her wallet was stolen on the way to the airport.  We have travelled (heck and lived) in numerous countries and never had an issue either any place else, oh wait .. Montreal a similar experience and I was there, so again no 'story'. 
    You're telling me you're not aware that story means "an account of past events in someone's life." If I said you or your wife or Gregg were making it up I wouldn't have minced words and would have reiterated my suspicion that one or more of you making it up, or at least in some way incorrect by your perception of events. As I stated in my anecdote, I've never experienced that, but I made no statement that your accounts are in any way less valid or inaccurate than mine.
    stompyStrangeDaysgatorguy
  • Reply 12 of 21
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 5,099member
    I traveled europe during the Bush administration and the unilateral Iraq war. Despite hearing similar stories i had no trouble anywhere, including France (Paris and Bordeaux). Perhaps it was being pleasant and using rudimentary french for common phrases and requests, but everyone was helpful and friendly, despite the political climate of the day. (In fact the only person to insist on a political argument with me over the president's war was a Scot in the pub!)
  • Reply 13 of 21
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,847member
    (In fact the only person to insist on a political argument with me over the president's war was a Scot in the pub!)
    For me, the only political incident of note was within a year after 9/11 by a Brit in an Irish-style pub in Spain.
  • Reply 14 of 21
    Parisians can be hard work. The French in general have always been smooth with me (an Englishman) providing I tried to communicate in French first. They seem to appreciate you having a stab. Only grim experience I had was a migrant at traffic lights starting to clean my windscreen uninvited. When I told him to stop, he gobbed on my car. Wanker. 

    Either way, some less than pleasant experiences reported here. Babel fish technology needs to hurry up. Love this Siri advance. 
  • Reply 15 of 21
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,463member
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    I hear about these stories but I've never had anything other than pleasantness from the French (and pretty much every other culture that others say are rude to tourists or Americans).
     Your comment makes me sound I'm making it up.  This wasn't a 'story'.  My wife phoned in tears and had be book her an earlier flight home. Oh and her wallet was stolen on the way to the airport.  We have travelled (heck and lived) in numerous countries and never had an issue either any place else, oh wait .. Montreal a similar experience and I was there, so again no 'story'. 
    You're telling me you're not aware that story means "an account of past events in someone's life." If I said you or your wife or Gregg were making it up I wouldn't have minced words and would have reiterated my suspicion that one or more of you making it up, or at least in some way incorrect by your perception of events. As I stated in my anecdote, I've never experienced that, but I made no statement that your accounts are in any way less valid or inaccurate than mine.
    Anecdotes are something I try to avoid.  I'm happy for you that you've only had good experiences in such situations, mais, c'estla vie.  Certaines choses sont bonnes, certaines choses sont mauvaises. N'est-ce pas?
  • Reply 16 of 21
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,847member
    MacPro said:
    Anecdotes are something I try to avoid.
    You literally started this off by telling "a short amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person." Plus, I've read countless stories from you over the years telling anecdotes about the UK, life around Sarasota, history with Apple products, things that happened to you—good and bad—about various tech products, etc. Those are all anecdotes. Most conversation is anecdotal.
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 17 of 21
    bonobobbonobob Posts: 107member
    MacPro said:
    Soli said:
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Here's 3 examples (out of many) of my experiences in France during the mid 1960s. As a teenager hitchhiking from Frankfurt to Spain I passed into France at Annecy where the French border guards refused to stamp my passport (as a souvenir of my travels). Passing through Grenoble I had trash thrown at me by passing cars. It seems the presence of an American flag on my back pack angered the drivers/passengers. In Lyon I was unable to communicate with the railroad ticket teller, although I spoke both Spanish and German (I lived in Frankfurt/grew up in So California). The concierge at the hotel across the street (a Spaniard) wrote what I needed. I took that back to the ticket teller. After successfully getting my ticket I reflexively said "Thank You", whereupon the ticket teller said "You're Welcome", then pointed out the way to my gate in perfect English. In all of my travels throughout Europe, Central America, and Asia (as a civilian and in the military) I have never met any people as rude as the French. I've never been back to France and have no desire to return.
    I hear about these stories but I've never had anything other than pleasantness from the French (and pretty much every other culture that others say are rude to tourists or Americans).
     Your comment makes me sound I'm making it up.  This wasn't a 'story'.  My wife phoned in tears and had be book her an earlier flight home. Oh and her wallet was stolen on the way to the airport.  We have travelled (heck and lived) in numerous countries and never had an issue either any place else, oh wait .. Montreal a similar experience and I was there, so again no 'story'. 

    BTW I lived for a few years in northern Spain, near the border, often popping over in France, and never had any issues with the French folks there.  My best friend of 40 years lives in central France and is English, no issues either.  It seems to be a problem in certain areas for some reason that baffles me.  You are very lucky and maybe you speak French?  As to Americans, never run across one in any country that wasn't very nice, many love the English for some strange reason lol.  The English abroad on the other hand, ever met football fans or tourists on the coast of the more 'popular' areas of the Costa Brava. OMG... lol (full disclosure I am dual English/American)
    I don't doubt your experience. However, I have found that by starting with pleasantries in French, followed by asking if they speak English (in French), I have been treated respectfully without fail. They don't always know English, but are polite about it and will still try to help as much as possible. The one time I failed to do this, following a stressful trip through airport security, the vendor sure let me hear about it. I was embarrassed and apologized for my indiscretion, which ameliorated the situation.
  • Reply 18 of 21
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,172moderator
    Google Translate is available on iphone. It can be used offline, can translate voice (mic) and text (camera). And translates more than 100 languages.
    It would be nice to see this functionality in Apple's version and be able to use it inside all apps like Safari. If there's a web page with text in a different language, it can just translate the whole page inline with the tap of a button, no redirects or copy/pasting. Apple's AR would do a good job of replacing text using the camera so reading a menu, bill or information leaflet. Airpods could also listen to someone talking to you with the mics and give translated audio like a modern day Babel fish. Offline use is important when travelling as people might not have data connections and roaming charges can be high. If the eSim options take off, it wouldn't be so important but speed is important in a conversation too.
  • Reply 19 of 21
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,725member
    Parisians can be hard work. The French in general have always been smooth with me (an Englishman) providing I tried to communicate in French first. They seem to appreciate you having a stab. Only grim experience I had was a migrant at traffic lights starting to clean my windscreen uninvited. When I told him to stop, he gobbed on my car. Wanker. 

    Either way, some less than pleasant experiences reported here. Babel fish technology needs to hurry up. Love this Siri advance. 
    Parisian are hard work even if you speak french, they regard everyone without a Paris accent as a kind of plebe despite most people not coming from there! (so most people are faking it... Maybe it is insecurity :-).
  • Reply 20 of 21
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 846member
    MacPro said:
    This is awesome and could have made it possible for an American grandmother (my wife) who, when alone and lost in Paris last year, was met by nothing but refusals to help unless she spoke in French from anyone she asked.  Her abilities in Latin and Spanish were of no avail.  Happily after an hour, now in darkness and quite fearful, an American couple who knew Paris came to her aid.  

    Then again, I wouldn't be surprised if seeing the use of an aid, such as an iPhone, help would still be refused on the grounds this still wasn't really speaking French. /yep still really, really pissed off about this!
    Google Translate is available on iphone. It can be used offline, can translate voice (mic) and text (camera). And translates more than 100 languages. Sorry to hear about your wife. It's awful to think anyone, no matter which language or culture, would be left helpless and lost
    Please do not bring Google Translate here. I tried that monstrosity in Japan, and instead of getting help I needed, it confused the hell out of every Japanese there.
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