Viral YouTube video of plane-to-plane AirDrop bogus, deleted by author

Posted:
in iPhone
A viral video allegedly depicting a pilot sending a photo of another plane a long-distance AirDrop has been refuted by the recipient's airline, and has been deleted.




Frequent YouTube poster LouB747 posted the video on Aug. 3. The video depicted him in the pilot seat communicating from 35,000 feet, with the other Singapore Airlines plane at 36,000 feet in close proximity.

The Singapore Airlines pilot denied that the AirDrop happened, though.

"Our pilot was only replying in jest to the radio message from the captain of the other flight," the airline told IBTimes UK. "Photos were exchanged by email later, however."

The video has since been deleted by the author.

AppleInsider noted that the video couldn't be authenticated on Friday, but confirmed the possibility of it with a naval aviator.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    In other news, employee gets in trouble for getting caught on video doing something against company policy; claims it's a misunderstanding and never happened.
    lolliver
  • Reply 2 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    Maybe AI should test this at the stated altitudes. How much can it cost to rent a couple planes for the day? :wink: 
    dacharlolliver
  • Reply 3 of 23
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    You mean there's fake tech news too?
    fotoformat
  • Reply 4 of 23
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
  • Reply 5 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    lolliver
  • Reply 6 of 23
    chabigchabig Posts: 641member
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
  • Reply 7 of 23
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,899administrator
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Okay, so: the math on it using the Friis Transmission Equation works out even with low-power signals like the bluetooth radio and wi-fi. Attenuation by water vapor is assumed by Friis to be at sea-level, and it's not the same at altitude -- it's a lot lower.

    So, in true Mythbusters fashion, it's plausible that it works -- just not confirmed by this particular video.

    Plus, the naval aviator we asked if it was possible? I've known him for 23 years.
    Solialmondrocalolliver
  • Reply 8 of 23
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,899administrator

    Soli said:
    Maybe AI should test this at the stated altitudes. How much can it cost to rent a couple planes for the day? :wink: 
    I'm on board, literally and figuratively. Let's fire up an indiegogo!
    SoliEsquireCatslolliver
  • Reply 9 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member

    Soli said:
    Maybe AI should test this at the stated altitudes. How much can it cost to rent a couple planes for the day? :wink: 
    I'm on board, literally and figuratively. Let's fire up an indiegogo!
    I’ll donate.
  • Reply 10 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    chabig said:
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
    1) Why do you say it’s beyond BT’s range?

    2) Why can’t someone name their iPhone “SingTriple7”?
    lolliver
  • Reply 11 of 23
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 621member
    sounds like he covering his **s to me. Just bc he broke possibly broke some internal rules and is now claiming publicly it never happened, doesn't mean it didn't happen.

    Think about the timeline of events how this was denied:
    1) video goes viral
    2) media contacts commercial airline
    3) commercial airline top brass internal conversation "Um, this may not be a good look for us, there may be some liability involved now or in future if our pilots start engaging in this behavior"
    4) Public statement "it never happened"
    edited August 2017 lolliver
  • Reply 12 of 23
    RKMStudiosRKMStudios Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    chabig said:
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
    Do we know it was an iPhone and not the cockpit iPads that Singapore Airlines might provide?   It seems the only thing saying that this video is bogus is the article.  Was there some proof provided that the footage wasn't real?
  • Reply 13 of 23
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member
    In other news, employee gets in trouble for getting caught on video doing something against company policy; claims it's a misunderstanding and never happened.


    This reminds me of a picture someone took of Flight Attendant standing in the opening of the non-running jet engineer. The person who took the picture complained to the airline and the airline said it was against company policy for anyone to be doing that other than a mechanic. Turned out later this was a long standing tradition in the airlines for new pilots and attendant to stand in the engine to get their pictures taken. The issue was they were seen by a passenger that person complained about safety issues.

  • Reply 14 of 23
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    Boom.
  • Reply 15 of 23
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,961member
    chabig said:
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
    Do we know it was an iPhone and not the cockpit iPads that Singapore Airlines might provide?   It seems the only thing saying that this video is bogus is the article.  Was there some proof provided that the footage wasn't real?
    A screen grab from the video shows his phone is in airplane mode, no AD would be possible. 

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/real-fake-viral-video-claims-pilot-sent-photos-via-airdrop-singapore-airlines-jet-35000ft-1633552
    edited August 2017
  • Reply 16 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    chabig said:
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
    Do we know it was an iPhone and not the cockpit iPads that Singapore Airlines might provide?   It seems the only thing saying that this video is bogus is the article.  Was there some proof provided that the footage wasn't real?
    A screen grab from the video shows his phone is in airplane mode, no AD would be possible. 

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/real-fake-viral-video-claims-pilot-sent-photos-via-airdrop-singapore-airlines-jet-35000ft-1633552
    What does that have to do with anything?
  • Reply 17 of 23
    Boom.

    Shouldn't that be "sonic boom"?
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 18 of 23
    chabig said:
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
    Do we know it was an iPhone and not the cockpit iPads that Singapore Airlines might provide?   It seems the only thing saying that this video is bogus is the article.  Was there some proof provided that the footage wasn't real?
    A screen grab from the video shows his phone is in airplane mode, no AD would be possible. 

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/real-fake-viral-video-claims-pilot-sent-photos-via-airdrop-singapore-airlines-jet-35000ft-1633552
    Turn on airplane mode, then turn on Bluetooth and wifi while still in airplane mode. AirDrop works perfectly this way with airplane mode showing enabled. 
    flashfan207
  • Reply 19 of 23
    laytechlaytech Posts: 339member
    Clearly a fake, I struggle for airdrop to work every time between my iPhone 8 and my iMac Mini 2016 model. Sometimes it works sometimes it does not. When it does, its terrific.
  • Reply 20 of 23
    chabig said:
    Soli said:
    Can't believe people actually thought this was real
    What about it do you know is impossible and that is common knowledge that no on should believe a radio signal can travel 300 meters?
    Radio obviously can travel 300m. But that's beyond Bluetooth (a very low power radio) range, and Bluetooth is needed for AirDrop to work. Plus, did you see the name of the receiving pilot's iPhone? Nobody names their iPhone "SingTriple7".
    Do we know it was an iPhone and not the cockpit iPads that Singapore Airlines might provide?   It seems the only thing saying that this video is bogus is the article.  Was there some proof provided that the footage wasn't real?
    A screen grab from the video shows his phone is in airplane mode, no AD would be possible. 

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/real-fake-viral-video-claims-pilot-sent-photos-via-airdrop-singapore-airlines-jet-35000ft-1633552
    Turn on airplane mode, then turn on Bluetooth and wifi while still in airplane mode. AirDrop works perfectly this way with airplane mode showing enabled. 
    Yep. 👍🏻
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