Code42 ends consumer CrashPlan backup plans to prioritize business services

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 2017
Code42, the company behind the CrashPlan online backup service, stopped accepting new subscribers for its CrashPlan for Home plan on Tuesday, with the backup firm shifting its focus away from consumers to enterprise and small business customers.




The CrashPlan website advises users that, effective as of August 22, Code42 will no longer accept new CrashPlan for Home subscriptions nor renewals of existing subscriptions. The sunsetting of the service will apparently take place over several months, with CrashPlan for Home expected to cease on October 23, 2018.

The service will continue to honor existing CrashPlan for Home subscriptions during this time, and has extended customer subscriptions at no extra cost by 60 days, to give users time to transition to a new backup system.

For customers wanting to stay with the service, Code42 suggests they move over to CrashPlan for Small Business, which costs $10 per month per device. Customers choosing this option will have their data moved over and will be able to use CrashPlan for Small Business for the remainder of their current Home subscription for free, followed by a 75 percent discount off the service for the following 12 months.

Carbonite is being offered as an alternative option, selected as an "exclusive partner" to Code42 for home users. Just as with CrashPlan for Small Business, subscribers are being offered a price cut for switching services to Carbonite, this time a discount of 50 percent, though customers won't be charged until their CrashPlan for Home subscription expires.

For customers who have a CrashPlan for Home subscription that extends beyond October 22, 2018, CrashPlan will automatically upgrade their account to the Small Business plan before the end-of-support date.

"The needs of our business and consumer customers have diverged dramatically in the past few years," said Code42 president and CEO Joe Payne about the end of the consumer service. "With the rise in threats facing organizations today, we are uniquely positioned to deliver the data security and visibility solutions those organizations require. This continues to fuel our high growth and is driving our strategic decision to focus solely on business and education markets."

"We worked hard to find the best possible alternatives for CrashPlan for Home customers as we transition out of the consumer market."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 31
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,786member
    A bunch of my former dot com colleagues work for Code42, neat to see them in the news here. Seems like a pretty decent place to work in Minneapolis. 
  • Reply 2 of 31
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,297member
    WHO? Never heard of it. maybe that's why they're getting out of the Home market. I've been using Carbonite for years.
  • Reply 3 of 31
    jbdragon said:
    WHO? Never heard of it. maybe that's why they're getting out of the Home market. I've been using Carbonite for years.
    Right.  Think about that.  For most consumers backing up isn't even a thought that enters their mind.  So, you're already in the minority for even performing a backup in the first place.  Now, you're someone who is obviously aware of at least some backup solutions and you've never even heard of CrashPlan.  I imagine that CrashPlan's consumer side doesn't amount to very many people.  It's probably just time for them not to bother with such a small subset of their customers, maybe more effort than it's worth.
    edited August 2017
  • Reply 4 of 31
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,294member
    jbdragon said:
    WHO? Never heard of it. maybe that's why they're getting out of the Home market. I've been using Carbonite for years.
    Crash Plan has been around a long time, maybe even before Carbonite. Not sure why they are getting out of the home market since Crash Plan had been one of the best companies to use. 
    omar morales
  • Reply 5 of 31
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    jbdragon said:
    WHO? Never heard of it. maybe that's why they're getting out of the Home market. I've been using Carbonite for years.
    Crash Plan has been around a long time, maybe even before Carbonite. Not sure why they are getting out of the home market since Crash Plan had been one of the best companies to use. 

    They're not getting out of the home market; they're simply covering up a massive dent in their business model, or this is a classic bait and switch; I haven't decided which. 
    The Home plan offered backups for all the machines in your home. This is dumb: a family of four all downloading music and videos and whatever else will use an awful lot of resources. There's no way you can plan ahead with that sort of arrangement. 

    So what CrashPlan is doing is getting rid of the families that are eating them alive, and hoping that those that stay will migrate to a service where they can charge per machine. 

    This 'focus on business' is pure bull. They got the maths wrong 
    edited August 2017 Frankus
  • Reply 6 of 31
    jbdragon said:
    WHO? Never heard of it. maybe that's why they're getting out of the Home market. I've been using Carbonite for years.
     I don't use Crashplan as I prefer Backblaze (have you ever heard about them?) But anyone that had done the slightest research on a serious online backup solution will have heard about Crashplan. 
  • Reply 7 of 31
    CrashPlan is (was) considered by many to be the best online backup service. If you've never heard of them, then you didn't do enough research into the online backup market.
    frannyor
  • Reply 8 of 31
    I use CrashPlan for Home and this sucks because I don't want to upgrade to their small business plan because of the price. Also, their alternative backup program Carbonite, they want to help you move to DOES NOT work on Linux like CrashPlan does. I use exclusively Debian Linux and will now have to look at alternative cloud backup solutions. Thanks CrashPlan.
  • Reply 9 of 31
    Oh, for crying out loud...I migrated to CrashPlan because Carbonite was so difficult to use. It kept crashing...I had to reinstall over and over. It was a memory hog and slowed my MacBook. And CP RECOMMENDS these goobertooths. (Or is it gooberteeth?)

    Maybe your average micro computer user doesn't think about backup, but I do. And I'd really appreciate a product that didn't suck. CrashPlan seemed like that product. 

    I already have an external HD with Carbon Copy Cloner, the Apple Time Capsule, and iCloud backup. I  would like another online backup, but Carbonite won't be it. I was using Backblaze, but then CrashPlan seemed like a good alternative. Guess I was wrong about that.

     I am just disgusted. And cheesed off that I have to find another backup option. Like most issues with Apple -- actually, all computer products -- this is way more trouble than it should be.
    edited August 2017 David_MICOwreighven
  • Reply 10 of 31
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    This is odd for sure. I know more people using Backblaze than Crashplan but both seemed like good options. I wonder why the shift?

    I wish there were spots available throughout the US to connect to 1GB fiber and complete your first backup. My internet speed is wouldn't allow me to backup any sooner than 7 months (just my SSD on my Mac). 
  • Reply 11 of 31
    jdb8167jdb8167 Posts: 626member
    frannyor said:

     I am just disgusted. And cheesed off that I have to find another backup option. Like most issues with Apple -- actually, all computer products -- this is way more trouble than it should be.
    I find BackBlaze better in almost every way than CrashPlan--moot now. CrashPlan never implemented a non-Java native client for the Mac despite promising for years. The only thing missing from BackBlaze is peer-to-peer backups which I never found very compelling anyway.
    edited August 2017
  • Reply 12 of 31
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,786member
    frannyor said:

     I am just disgusted. And cheesed off that I have to find another backup option. Like most issues with Apple -- actually, all computer products -- this is way more trouble than it should be.
    Strange comment. I find most of my computing with Apple to be worth the rare instances of trouble. As a longtime Windows user and developer, it's night & day -- so little of my life is now spent dicking around in my desktop OS, reinstalling, fixing registry keys, etc...
    David_MICOmacky the mackywatto_cobraRayz2016
  • Reply 13 of 31
    This truly sucks. At least I've had the benefit of CrashPlan for close to a decade. It's true what another poster said - there's no way this is feasible as a business model. I'd be happy if they doubled the price and kept it going! All the alternatives stink.
    David_MICO
  • Reply 14 of 31
    Have used CrashPlan home for last six years. Very happy.

    Have now switched over to Pro following their instructions: present contract stays valid (and therefore paid for). Renewal will cost u$s 2,50/month for first year (which is less than the yearly subscription for home version), afterwards u$s 10/month (per device). So actually have nearly two years to decide whether to pay u$s 10 or switch to something else.

    Great thing about CrashPlan is that they keep erased or lost files plus keep weekly/monthly yearly versions of documents you have worked on (all configurable). That is something I appreciate and not everyone has. So I can restore an old version from years ago.

    Did not have family plan (no one wanted to share their PCs backup with me via one and only email/password) so no change there.


  • Reply 15 of 31
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    In about a year you'll be able to use Filecoin to store stuff on the web in a distributed, anonymous and encrypted form for much less, so...

    http://filecoin.io
    edited August 2017
  • Reply 16 of 31
    barthrhbarthrh Posts: 136member
    Based on the comments here and a quick check, looks like Backblaze is the best bet. The issue with Carbonite is that they back up ONLY ONE external drive. If you have more than one, you need to do some consolidation. BB does them all. The best bet in the short term, however, is to convert your CrashPlan to the Small Business account because it's a paltry $2.50/mo for the next year after your current subscription expires.
  • Reply 17 of 31
    Been a user of CrashPlan since 2013. For Mac users best alternative amongst strong competitors. Code42's decision makes me question if the similarly priced alternatives are viable longterm (e.g. Carbonite, BackBlaze, etc.). If Code42 decided to depart the low cost consumer market why not the others? Is there enough profit to operate in the $60/month market?

    Code42's offer to migrate to the Small Business plan is effectively a price increase. In my case likely the right choice given CrashPlan's strengths over the alternatives (true continuous backups, retention of versions forever, support of local backups, etc.)

    I'll be researching their migration to Small Business given my 1TB of photos, digitized family 8mm films, music and general data. Who wants to upload that to another provider ESPECIALLY with Comcast's broadband CAP?!
  • Reply 18 of 31
    Code42 has made it clear they are focusing on businesses, and most importantly, enterprise ever since they brought on a new CEO. CrashPlan has some amazing administration features, but with it being Java based, it can become a pathetic piece of software if you are backing up a ton of data, and it will eat tons of RAM on your computer to keep itself running.

    I have since moved all my clients to BackBlaze and don't use Crashplan anymore. BackBlaze has it's own slew of problem, but in terms of pricing and the backup engine, it's extremely good. Their Windows and Mac agents are written with native code, hardly use any RAM or CPU resources, and the agent just runs silky smooth on most computers I put it on. I have one client backing up 6TB on one computer and Backblaze doesn't skip a beat. CrashPlan would choke and use tons more resources to accomplish the same goal.
  • Reply 19 of 31
    barthrhbarthrh Posts: 136member
    BackBlaze has it's own slew of problem...
    What are they? Curious to know before I make a move (lots of time since I took the $2.50/mo discounted SB rate).
  • Reply 20 of 31
    barthrh said:
    BackBlaze has it's own slew of problem...
    What are they? Curious to know before I make a move (lots of time since I took the $2.50/mo discounted SB rate).
    If you are buying for your personal use, then I would say you are fine. Remember though, Backblaze is not a archive service like CrashPlan was. If you delete something on your computer, Backblaze will purge it from your backup within 30 days.

    My main problem with Backblaze is admin features for handling lots of computers across different companies and groups. This is something that CrashPlan excelled at, and something that BackBlaze hasn't taken seriously. However, price and backup engine are my #1 priorities, and BackBlaze wins out soley on those alone.
    kruegdude
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