Samsung's Galaxy Note 8 gets positive reviews, comparisons with iPhone 7 Plus 'Portrait' m...

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  • Reply 41 of 44
    nht said:
    EngDev said:
    nht said:
    EngDev said:
    nht said:

    Not when it's called "Portrait Mode".  Typically the face is the thing you want to get in focus for portraits.  

    ...

    TL;DR;  Its called Portrait Mode.  Focusing on the face is entirely the point.
    This feature shouldn't be exclusively for headshots.

    The face is important, but features, like the body and clothing, can play a huge factor in a portrait and should not have any more blur than the face.
    Even though when using a DSLR you get blur?  How many DSLR shots do I have to provide where the face is in focus but the shirt is not for you to believe that the iPhone is simulating DSLR thin DoF results better than Samsung?  

    Now you're just trolling.
    When you're using a DSLR, you don't get blur on things in the same plane of focus, which is exactly what the iPhone 7 Plus is doing by focusing only on the face and blurring everything else.


    Source: Appleinsider

    Note that the iPhone is blurring the clothing while the DSLR is not (look at the letters, the zipper, etc.).

    In fact, the iPhone can't take a proper picture of a slightly turned face either. When you try to do that, it keeps the entire face in focus, despite one side of the face being further than the other side. 

    Your ignorance doesn't mean I'm "trolling".
    50mm f4 doesn't give you shallow DoF.  At 8 feet your DoF with a 50mm at f4 is 22 inches.  Meaning everything 11 inches in front and behind the focal point will be in focus.

    At f1.8 the DoF 7.7 inches.  That means only things 3.8 inches in front or behind is in focus.  Which means the chest is likely OOF when shooting wide open with a prime to get the shallowest DoF for portraits.

    The "plane of focus" isn't a plane as it has depth.  Who's the ignorant one?


    You're dodging the point completely. The plane of focus for the face is at the same depth as parts of the sweater, such as the zipper, and should not appear out of focus. You fail to acknowledge the obvious flaw in the iPhone's software which only focuses on the face. This flaw in portrait mode is on the software's end. Again, not this feature is not exclusively for headshots.


  • Reply 42 of 44
    nhtnht Posts: 4,456member
    EngDev said:
    nht said:
    EngDev said:
    nht said:
    EngDev said:
    nht said:

    Not when it's called "Portrait Mode".  Typically the face is the thing you want to get in focus for portraits.  

    ...

    TL;DR;  Its called Portrait Mode.  Focusing on the face is entirely the point.
    This feature shouldn't be exclusively for headshots.

    The face is important, but features, like the body and clothing, can play a huge factor in a portrait and should not have any more blur than the face.
    Even though when using a DSLR you get blur?  How many DSLR shots do I have to provide where the face is in focus but the shirt is not for you to believe that the iPhone is simulating DSLR thin DoF results better than Samsung?  

    Now you're just trolling.
    When you're using a DSLR, you don't get blur on things in the same plane of focus, which is exactly what the iPhone 7 Plus is doing by focusing only on the face and blurring everything else.


    Source: Appleinsider

    Note that the iPhone is blurring the clothing while the DSLR is not (look at the letters, the zipper, etc.).

    In fact, the iPhone can't take a proper picture of a slightly turned face either. When you try to do that, it keeps the entire face in focus, despite one side of the face being further than the other side. 

    Your ignorance doesn't mean I'm "trolling".
    50mm f4 doesn't give you shallow DoF.  At 8 feet your DoF with a 50mm at f4 is 22 inches.  Meaning everything 11 inches in front and behind the focal point will be in focus.

    At f1.8 the DoF 7.7 inches.  That means only things 3.8 inches in front or behind is in focus.  Which means the chest is likely OOF when shooting wide open with a prime to get the shallowest DoF for portraits.

    The "plane of focus" isn't a plane as it has depth.  Who's the ignorant one?


    You're dodging the point completely. The plane of focus for the face is at the same depth as parts of the sweater, such as the zipper, and should not appear out of focus. You fail to acknowledge the obvious flaw in the iPhone's software which only focuses on the face. This flaw in portrait mode is on the software's end. Again, not this feature is not exclusively for headshots.
    Nope, not dodging anything. 

    The example used here isn't what the iPhone is trying to emulate: a fast prime wide open with a shallow DoF.

    So the "flaw" is trying to compare a DSLR image taken at f4 against a simulated DSLR shot with a couple more stops shallower DoF.  Does the iPhone provide a perfect simulation?  No, of course not.

    But comparing it against something it isn't trying to emulate doesn't show anything other than you aren't in any position to call anyone else ignorant.

    it doesn't just focus on the face. Focus is placed on the face by the photographer and it uses its depth mask to blur things aggressively as if was a fast prime.  If you don't want simulated shallow depth of field, don't use this mode.
  • Reply 43 of 44
    nht said:
    Yeah, but seeing how it would perform in extreme cases gives an idea of how well that algorithm performs in the majority of cases.
    You can clearly see that spotty DoF effect application from Note phone, which clearly tells you that Sammy did not nail reliable depth mask generation, and hence, the effect sucks so much that it is unusable. In other words, it is what Sammy normally excels at - creating a software feature/tool that no one is going to use, because results are rarely good. THAT is a difference between Apple and Sammy. The difference "nominally" is small. But in reality, if that is how Note generates depth masks, the result is going to suck big time, while for Apple DoF effect is going to be usable 90-95% of time.
    In Samsungs "defense" they called it "Live Focus" which essentially means nothing so they kinda sorta delivered what they promised.  A tool that maybe, maybe not blurs the background in a useful way.

    LOL, that is true.
  • Reply 44 of 44
    nht said:
    EngDev said:
    nht said:
    EngDev said:
    nht said:

    Not when it's called "Portrait Mode".  Typically the face is the thing you want to get in focus for portraits.  

    ...

    TL;DR;  Its called Portrait Mode.  Focusing on the face is entirely the point.
    This feature shouldn't be exclusively for headshots.

    The face is important, but features, like the body and clothing, can play a huge factor in a portrait and should not have any more blur than the face.
    Even though when using a DSLR you get blur?  How many DSLR shots do I have to provide where the face is in focus but the shirt is not for you to believe that the iPhone is simulating DSLR thin DoF results better than Samsung?  

    Now you're just trolling.
    When you're using a DSLR, you don't get blur on things in the same plane of focus, which is exactly what the iPhone 7 Plus is doing by focusing only on the face and blurring everything else.


    Source: Appleinsider

    Note that the iPhone is blurring the clothing while the DSLR is not (look at the letters, the zipper, etc.).

    In fact, the iPhone can't take a proper picture of a slightly turned face either. When you try to do that, it keeps the entire face in focus, despite one side of the face being further than the other side. 

    Your ignorance doesn't mean I'm "trolling".
    50mm f4 doesn't give you shallow DoF.  At 8 feet your DoF with a 50mm at f4 is 22 inches.  Meaning everything 11 inches in front and behind the focal point will be in focus.

    At f1.8 the DoF 7.7 inches.  That means only things 3.8 inches in front or behind is in focus.  Which means the chest is likely OOF when shooting wide open with a prime to get the shallowest DoF for portraits.

    The "plane of focus" isn't a plane as it has depth.  Who's the ignorant one?


    Plane of focus actually is a plane where focus is the sharpest.
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