Time uses iPhone to shoot magazine covers for 'Firsts' documentary series

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 2017
Time Magazine selected iPhone as its photography tool of choice for the upcoming "Firsts: Women Who Are Changing The World," a multi-platform documentary magazine series and companion book featuring influential women.




As detailed by Kira Pollack, Director of Photography and Visual Enterprise at Time, the magazine contracted Brazilian photographer Luisa Drr to shoot the spread with her iPhone. With work showcasing her native Brazil, Drr was discovered through her Instagram feed, the bio portion of which reads, "All photos made with the iPhone."

Pollack invited the photographer to apply her unique talent to Time's ambitious documentary series. Armed only with an iPhone and minimal field equipment, like a bounce reflector, Drr traveled the U.S. to photograph her vision of some of the most influential women alive.


Photographer Luisa Drr photographs Oprah Winfrey with an iPhone in 2016. | Source: Time


Over the course of the year-long project, Drr used personal iPhones to capture portraits of 46 subjects including Hillary Rodham Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, Janet Yellen, Selena Gomez, Serena Williams, Melinda Gates, Cindy Sherman and other notable names. An iPhone 5 captured the first images in the series, shots of GM CEO Mary Barra, before Drr moved on to an iPhone 6, 6s Plus and finally iPhone 7.

In an interview, Drr explains that because iPhone is always in her pocket, it lets her capture great pictures anywhere, anytime. The alternative is lugging around bulky professional camera equipment. Further, shooting with an iPhone puts subjects at ease as the process is less intrusive, Drr says.

"I like the simplicity of how these pictures are made. But the best part is that as a photographer, you feel extremely light and free. It is almost as if I can make pictures with my hand," Drr said. "There's no noise, gadgets, tools or plugs-- just the subject and myself."

The women featured in "Firsts," many of whom are no stranger to photo shoots, were surprised that Time chose a relatively young photographer bearing little more than an iPhone, but the results speak volumes. For the "Firsts" series, most shoots took about five to ten minutes, with the shortest coming in at around two minutes.

Powerful stories, striking portraits! Bravo @TIME and Luisa Dorr #ShotoniPhone #SheIsTheFirst https://t.co/i5hS8IFgE8

-- Tim Cook (@tim_cook)


Apple's smartphones are often used in professional photo shoots. In the past, magazines like Vogue and Sports Illustrated, the latter being a Time publication, have opted to use iPhone to gain a unique perspective on their subject.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,413member
    It's articles like this one that make me scratch my head. We are constantly being told by the usual suspects here that the iPhone camera is substandard, years behind, not enough pixels. Sites like c|net declare pictures taken with a Samsung phone are better than iPhone pictures. Then an article like this one comes along and PROFESSIONAL photographers choose the iPhone for their work. Of course the rebuttals claim Apple is paying professional photographers big money to use the iPhone and that the iPhone takes shitty pictures.  Is Apple paying everybody off? Are we living in an Apple controlled Matrix?

    Or are the usual suspects here just idiots spewing diarrhea from their pie holes?
    edited September 2017 tmaybshankradarthekatmwhitegregg thurmanwatto_cobradirecthackerStrangeDayspscooter63
  • Reply 2 of 23
    Nobody makes better cameras than a company that makes a line of internet-connected refrigerators.
  • Reply 3 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,292member
    lkrupp said:
    It's articles like this one that make me scratch my head. We are constantly being told by the usual suspects here that the iPhone camera is substandard, years behind, not enough pixels. Sites like c|net declare pictures taken with a Samsung phone are better than iPhone pictures. Then an article like this one comes along and PROFESSIONAL photographers choose the iPhone for their work. Of course the rebuttals claim Apple is paying professional photographers big money to use the iPhone and that the iPhone takes shitty pictures.  Is Apple paying everybody off? Are we living in an Apple controlled Matrix?

    Or are the usual suspects here just idiots spewing diarrhea from their pie holes?
    And in some isolated, technical aspect that may very well be true-ish, but the iPhone also has the most HW adapters to enhance picture quality, but even if you don't use that they still have the best SW editing apps, but you could always offload to another system and device after the photo was taken, and even that is inconsequential when it comes to being a good photographer.


    edited September 2017 russwwillcropointgregoriusm2old4fungregg thurmanwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 23
    lkrupp said:
    It's articles like this one that make me scratch my head. We are constantly being told by the usual suspects here that the iPhone camera is substandard, years behind, not enough pixels. Sites like c|net declare pictures taken with a Samsung phone are better than iPhone pictures. Then an article like this one comes along and PROFESSIONAL photographers choose the iPhone for their work. Of course the rebuttals claim Apple is paying professional photographers big money to use the iPhone and that the iPhone takes shitty pictures.  Is Apple paying everybody off? Are we living in an Apple controlled Matrix?

    Or are the usual suspects here just idiots spewing diarrhea from their pie holes?
    I'm not a professional photographer. But I'm certainly an enthusiast. And I have been paid for editorial photography in a prior freelance period of my life. I edit photography which accounts for over 50% of my freelance graphic design business. I contribute to stock agencies. 

    I have sold sold a couple images shot on iPhone through stock agencies.

    in fact, many stock agencies have iOS apps with image uploaders built in. They are actively encouraging iPhone photographers to submit. 

    Especialy now that iOS can capture RAW files, there is no reason certain types of photography cannot be competently shot with iPhone. 

    I love shooting RAW with the iPhone and processing the image with my professional imaging software. The results can be amazing. 
    tmaymacky the mackywatto_cobrapscooter63
  • Reply 5 of 23
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,579member
    polymnia said:
    lkrupp said:
    It's articles like this one that make me scratch my head. We are constantly being told by the usual suspects here that the iPhone camera is substandard, years behind, not enough pixels. Sites like c|net declare pictures taken with a Samsung phone are better than iPhone pictures. Then an article like this one comes along and PROFESSIONAL photographers choose the iPhone for their work. Of course the rebuttals claim Apple is paying professional photographers big money to use the iPhone and that the iPhone takes shitty pictures.  Is Apple paying everybody off? Are we living in an Apple controlled Matrix?

    Or are the usual suspects here just idiots spewing diarrhea from their pie holes?
    I'm not a professional photographer. But I'm certainly an enthusiast. And I have been paid for editorial photography in a prior freelance period of my life. I edit photography which accounts for over 50% of my freelance graphic design business. I contribute to stock agencies. 

    I have sold sold a couple images shot on iPhone through stock agencies.

    in fact, many stock agencies have iOS apps with image uploaders built in. They are actively encouraging iPhone photographers to submit. 

    Especialy now that iOS can capture RAW files, there is no reason certain types of photography cannot be competently shot with iPhone. 

    I love shooting RAW with the iPhone and processing the image with my professional imaging software. The results can be amazing. 
    I'd forgotten about the RAW capture capability but also, I don't have professional software now. Would it be worth trying and using Pixelmator? (I have previously done a fair amount of image processing.) I recently set video capture to 4k and am blown away by the results.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 23
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    It's articles like this one that make me scratch my head. We are constantly being told by the usual suspects here that the iPhone camera is substandard, years behind, not enough pixels. Sites like c|net declare pictures taken with a Samsung phone are better than iPhone pictures. Then an article like this one comes along and PROFESSIONAL photographers choose the iPhone for their work. Of course the rebuttals claim Apple is paying professional photographers big money to use the iPhone and that the iPhone takes shitty pictures.  Is Apple paying everybody off? Are we living in an Apple controlled Matrix?

    Or are the usual suspects here just idiots spewing diarrhea from their pie holes?
    And in some isolated, technical aspect that may very well be true-ish, but the iPhone also has the most HW adapters to enhance picture quality, but even if you don't use that they still have the best SW editing apps, but you could always offload to another system and device after the photo was taken, and even that is inconsequential when it comes to being a good photographer.


    +1 on great HW & SW being available to the iPhone photographer. 

    I just picked up the Manfrotto pixi & phone clip system which is a super solid tripod with ball-head and standard 1/4" screw. While not iPhone-specific, it is featured in Apple stores where I first played around with them. The pixi is strong enough to hold a full DSLR with a modest lens. Easy to tote with me while I bike around town. The tripod you have with you is the best tripod, as the old saying goes. 

    And, of course, Lightroom Mobile for iOS is incredibl. you can shoot & process DNG format RAW files within the app. You can also process native RAW formats from DSLRs or mirrorless cameras.

    we are close to being able to do the basic capture (or import and edit DSLR captures) and initial processing on mobile devices right now. 
    gregoriusm
  • Reply 7 of 23
    iqatedo said:
    polymnia said:
    lkrupp said:
    It's articles like this one that make me scratch my head. We are constantly being told by the usual suspects here that the iPhone camera is substandard, years behind, not enough pixels. Sites like c|net declare pictures taken with a Samsung phone are better than iPhone pictures. Then an article like this one comes along and PROFESSIONAL photographers choose the iPhone for their work. Of course the rebuttals claim Apple is paying professional photographers big money to use the iPhone and that the iPhone takes shitty pictures.  Is Apple paying everybody off? Are we living in an Apple controlled Matrix?

    Or are the usual suspects here just idiots spewing diarrhea from their pie holes?
    I'm not a professional photographer. But I'm certainly an enthusiast. And I have been paid for editorial photography in a prior freelance period of my life. I edit photography which accounts for over 50% of my freelance graphic design business. I contribute to stock agencies. 

    I have sold sold a couple images shot on iPhone through stock agencies.

    in fact, many stock agencies have iOS apps with image uploaders built in. They are actively encouraging iPhone photographers to submit. 

    Especialy now that iOS can capture RAW files, there is no reason certain types of photography cannot be competently shot with iPhone. 

    I love shooting RAW with the iPhone and processing the image with my professional imaging software. The results can be amazing. 
    I'd forgotten about the RAW capture capability but also, I don't have professional software now. Would it be worth trying and using Pixelmator? (I have previously done a fair amount of image processing.) I recently set video capture to 4k and am blown away by the results.
    I'm not sure if Pixelmator can process RAW. but if it does, absolutely! Give it a try. Lightroom Mobile is my weapon of choice, but I have read there are several other RAW processors. 

    Just be sure you are actually processing the RAW data, not just opening & editing the attached JPEG preview. That is a common mistake that is frustrating and makes many people think RAW processing is bullshit.  
    Anilu_777iqatedogregoriusmpscooter63
  • Reply 8 of 23
    digitalm0nkeysdigitalm0nkeys Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    I'm not sure why this is so special. The iPhone has a good camera if you're a decent photographer you'll get good pictures. What does it matter how you achieve something the result is what counts. 
    polymnia
  • Reply 9 of 23
    What is 'Time'?
  • Reply 10 of 23
    What is 'Time'?
    Time's up!
  • Reply 11 of 23

    I've just started using the ExoLens lenses for the iPhone. There is a 0.6x Wide Angle lens, a 2.0x Zoom lens and a Macro Lens. I think the optics on them are amazing. They really enhance the abilities of the iPhone.

    The iPhone has become the default camera for my vacations since the 7 Plus has released. I don't miss dedicated cameras yet. I'd carry one along next only if I'm off on a safari or something.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 23
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,579member
    polymnia said:
    ...

    Just be sure you are actually processing the RAW data, not just opening & editing the attached JPEG preview. That is a common mistake that is frustrating and makes many people think RAW processing is bullshit.  
    I would not have known that probably - thanks.
    edited September 2017 gregoriusm
  • Reply 13 of 23
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,227member
    Nobody makes better cameras than a company that makes a line of internet-connected refrigerators.
    And washing machines that can take out a garage wall. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 23
    You guys just don't get it. With good lighting, even an average smartphone can get a decent photo. Given iPhone is very good photography tool. It is not that that hard to get a great photo, if you know what you are doing.
  • Reply 15 of 23
    You need to consider that this also catches a headline... "People ask if we are still relevant! Quick lets play a stunt where other publications will link back to us and give us free advertising" "Time shoots on iPhone" creates way more headlines than "Time shoots on Pixel" or "Time shoots on 10kUSD SLRs"
  • Reply 16 of 23
    ...
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 17 of 23
    mike54mike54 Posts: 256member
    I don't think there's a camera that will take a bad photo of that girl in the first photo. Very nice.
    watto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 18 of 23
    I'm not sure why this is so special. The iPhone has a good camera if you're a decent photographer you'll get good pictures. What does it matter how you achieve something the result is what counts. 
    What's interesting is that people claim the iPhone camera is amazing and has been for some time, yet we're supposed to pay extra attention to the iPhone being used as a camera for photojournalism. Are we supposed to be impressed that great photos were taken with a great camera?
  • Reply 19 of 23
    seafox said:
    I'm not sure why this is so special. The iPhone has a good camera if you're a decent photographer you'll get good pictures. What does it matter how you achieve something the result is what counts. 
    What's interesting is that people claim the iPhone camera is amazing and has been for some time, yet we're supposed to pay extra attention to the iPhone being used as a camera for photojournalism. Are we supposed to be impressed that great photos were taken with a great camera?
    I suppose we should be about as impressed as we would seeing a commercial aircraft pilot fly a two-seat jet coast-to-coast. 

    Its obvious the skill is there, but the device is novel and might present a couple unique (but very solvable) challenges. 
  • Reply 20 of 23
    I have just got back from Italy where I visited Pompeii and took loads of photographs on my SE. I am no photographer by any means, but I must admit I am really impressed by how good the photos came out. Zooming in to photos reveals details that I didn't see in real life and I didn't have to delete any photos because the came out bad. I also think the size of the SE makes it a great phone for photography. 
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