Reminder: Apple says it's only streaming 4K iTunes movies, not offering downloads

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 51
    mac_128 said:
    rprice54 said:
    Well, that’s a dealbreaker for me. I don’t have access to those kind of speeds where I live. I’ll put that money back in my pocket and get a UHD disc player and keep buying discs. 
    You'd be doing that anyway, or waiting hours to download a movie. I'm sure Apple cache's the movie on the expanded storage space for the ATV, so streaming it would only take a little pre-planning? Hopefully.
    But if I could download the movie then once it’s stored I am good to go. I have my entire movie library stored on a NAS for Easy streaming to my current ATV. If I could do the same for 4K I would quit buying discs. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 51
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,541member
    Will the hand wringing ever end...

    - Apple TV in its recent incarnation over many years has not supported downloads
    - 4K resolution is not something anyone will notice on an iPad or iPhone screen
    - The only area where this has any impact is downloading a 4K file to a Mac/PC.  I doubt any statistical meaningful number watch a movie on these platforms, and unlikely that many more stream to their ATV from iTunes vs. stream directly from Apple.  I am a pretty big Apple enthusiast and product owner, and don't do this anymore.
    - No doubt this is entirely rooted in the licensing rules demanded by the content owners (e.g. not an Apple initiated restriction, as limited as it is).
    - Anyone who tries to tie this to climate change is beyond desperate

    watto_cobrarandominternetperson
  • Reply 23 of 51
    The pirates win again. How do you stream a 4K movie over a 5 mbps DSL connection if that is all that is available where you live? You don't. You say "screw this" and download a pirated 4K version since you have already paid for the content and you would not feel even slightly bad about it.
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 24 of 51
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,441member
    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
    So we "sort of" get an upgrade to 4K.   Streaming only sounds nice but I've already exceeded my Comcast Terabyte cap like 4 times.  4K isn't going to make this cap any harder to hit.  

    Also it's not the most carbon friendly approach.   Content Distribution Networks are fueled by datacenters which are often "fueled" by energy sources that aren't so clean.  I'm a bit dismayed that a company that prides itself on not using non-recyclable materials is promoting a carbon unfriendly approach to video video disty. 

    I'm going to pick up a Nvidia Shield TV and see how that works along with a ATV 4K.   I'm feeling too constrained with streamers and this "Just stream everything" when my fastest network at home is my LAN. 

    So people buy the movie on DVD, and now that it's out on Blue-Ray, they magically expect the studios to give it to them for free?  There is nothing to read here.

    I'm not sure I buy the carbon footprint here... it's much less than the old days of stamping-out a billion DVD's on plastic, and VHS videotapes back in the day.  You're watching the 4K movie either on your TV, or computer, or both... so you're burning electricity either way, and the datacenter still remain on and running whether people stream movies or not.
    https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/sources-greenhouse-gas-emissions

    The generation of Electricity in its entirety contributes more carbon than our vehicle emissions.  Data centers are getting cleaner thanks to solar and hydroelectric. The first thing I do in every new home is replace low efficiency appliances and lighting. The wife and I are looking at Solar for our roof. 

    Our children have to clean up the trash the former generation leaves. I’m trying to keep that mess as small as possible 
    Then Apple is the sort of data center you should want more of. They’re powered 100% by renewable energy sources.

    https://www.apple.com/environment/
    "Powered by" is a bit of a misnomer, at least as most general readers would understand it, just as it is when almost every other company claims it. In truth most of Apple's electricity originates from the same coal/oil/'nuclear power-plants that we all depend on. So what makes it possible to claim "powered 100% by renewable energy"? Trading in Green Energy Credits. If you read the fine print in Apple's Energy Reports you find it mentioned. (I've linked them before)

    Before you start, No I'm not of the belief Apple is being is being dishonest either, What you think "powered by" and what business means when they say it are two different definitions. You just have to read up to understand what it means.

    Apple absolutely deserves kudos for championing wind farms, solar and other renewable energy sources, they lead by example and with their own pocketbook. They are also far better than some of their other tech brethren in this regard (looking at you Amazon)...but heir North Carolina data center is one of the examples of where what is said is not what you're hearing. In truth their North Carolina power operations are powered by Duke Energy, a producer who depends primarily on coal and nuclear and that's what is sent to their Maidenhead center. Purchasing and/or trading in Green credits allow them to claim 100% renewable. 

    I don't know if you'll bother to read this Forbes link which explains it (and which I would agree upfront comes off as aggressively and unnecessarily harsh on Apple so you'll have to look past it) but it's here if you want to understand the difference between the claim and what you thought Apple was saying. 
    EDIT: I'm deleting that link to prevent a needless distraction from the thread topic. If you want to separate the wheat from the chaff to understand what an enterprise claiming to be using  "100% renewable" sources really means and how it's accomplished it will be easy enough to look for yourself.  
    You would do well to delete this mess that you've written.

    Your complaint is the purity and granularity of how electrons are pushed around the grid, not Apple's, nor anyone else's for that matter, investments and green offsets.


    randominternetperson
  • Reply 25 of 51
    The pirates win again. How do you stream a 4K movie over a 5 mbps DSL connection if that is all that is available where you live? You don't. You say "screw this" and download a pirated 4K version since you have already paid for the content and you would not feel even slightly bad about it.
    Those are odd pirates.  I'm pretty sure the movie industry isn't too upset about people who download copies of media that they have already purchased.  I'm equally sure that pirate sites are overwhelmingly used by people who don't have vast Blu-Ray collections.
  • Reply 26 of 51
    brucemc said:
    Will the hand wringing ever end...

    - Apple TV in its recent incarnation over many years has not supported downloads
    - 4K resolution is not something anyone will notice on an iPad or iPhone screen
    - The only area where this has any impact is downloading a 4K file to a Mac/PC.  I doubt any statistical meaningful number watch a movie on these platforms, and unlikely that many more stream to their ATV from iTunes vs. stream directly from Apple.  I am a pretty big Apple enthusiast and product owner, and don't do this anymore.
    - No doubt this is entirely rooted in the licensing rules demanded by the content owners (e.g. not an Apple initiated restriction, as limited as it is).
    - Anyone who tries to tie this to climate change is beyond desperate

    Agreed.  Are they any estimates of how many homes have 4K capable TVs?  It's got to be a small minority now with rapid growth imminent.

    In any case, more and more people are getting all of their content from streaming, so this is a non-issue.  If you have crappy, capped broadband take that up with your provider (or their regulators).
  • Reply 27 of 51
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,311member
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! This is one of the reasons why Streaming is so popular. because the quality of the stream is so much lower than from a Blu-Ray Disc, that HD streaming looked just fine to people because of having to small of a HDTV. Hell you could watch a DVD and it would look just fine. Because that's about the quality you're streaming. Same goes with 4K. It's not Ultra Blu-Ray Disc quality, but people can't tell, because the TV's are way to small for the distance they sit. They can't see the better detail anyway.

    https://www.tekrevue.com/tv-screen-size-calculator/

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    edited March 2018 tmay
  • Reply 28 of 51
    What about the actual video files themselves?  That is, are they still in H.264, or are they being updated to H.265?  If it hasn't been switched over, might they be waiting for the new release of MacOS, next week?
    H265 4K files end up being just slightly larger than the 1080p equivalent in x264
  • Reply 29 of 51
    NotsofastNotsofast Posts: 450member
    So we "sort of" get an upgrade to 4K.   Streaming only sounds nice but I've already exceeded my Comcast Terabyte cap like 4 times.  4K isn't going to make this cap any harder to hit.  

    Also it's not the most carbon friendly approach.   Content Distribution Networks are fueled by datacenters which are often "fueled" by energy sources that aren't so clean.  I'm a bit dismayed that a company that prides itself on not using non-recyclable materials is promoting a carbon unfriendly approach to video video disty. 

    I'm going to pick up a Nvidia Shield TV and see how that works along with a ATV 4K.   I'm feeling too constrained with streamers and this "Just stream everything" when my fastest network at home is my LAN. 
    All of Apple's data centers are powered by 100% renewable energy which is where the streaming is coming from so there isn't anything that is "carbon unfriendly" about this approach. In fact, downloading has a much greater negative environmental impact as it requires millions of decentralized storage devices, energy to store and maintain that data, waste when they have to be replaced or their parts upgraded.  As an eco-warrior no doubt you will move to streaming only.
  • Reply 30 of 51
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,040member
    The pirates win again. How do you stream a 4K movie over a 5 mbps DSL connection if that is all that is available where you live? You don't. You say "screw this" and download a pirated 4K version since you have already paid for the content and you would not feel even slightly bad about it.
    Are pirates really providing 4K content? Or are they stating it's a 4K version when in fact it is lower resolution? 
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 31 of 51
    sirlance99sirlance99 Posts: 1,295member
    jbdragon said:
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! This is one of the reasons why Streaming is so popular. because the quality of the stream is so much lower than from a Blu-Ray Disc, that HD streaming looked just fine to people because of having to small of a HDTV. Hell you could watch a DVD and it would look just fine. Because that's about the quality you're streaming. Same goes with 4K. It's not Ultra Blu-Ray Disc quality, but people can't tell, because the TV's are way to small for the distance they sit. They can't see the better detail anyway.

    https://www.tekrevue.com/tv-screen-size-calculator/

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    I buy all my movies in 4K for around $5-$10. Just bought the new Thor movie in 4K for $10, which is only 4K on Vudu and not iTunes. 
  • Reply 32 of 51
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,388member
    jbdragon said:
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! 
    ???
    Forget the calculator. I just replaced my 50" plasma (donated to my son) with a TCL 607P55 4K, viewed anywhere from 6-8 feet from the display.  There's a HUGE difference in the image quality, even standard non-HDR content. I've seen those "calculator's" before and IMO they are somewhat nonsense, a suggested best-case rather than a rule, and if that's what is holding you back then don't. It is certainly worth it.  

    edited March 2018 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 33 of 51
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,407member
    sflocal said:
    So we "sort of" get an upgrade to 4K.   Streaming only sounds nice but I've already exceeded my Comcast Terabyte cap like 4 times.  4K isn't going to make this cap any harder to hit.  

    Also it's not the most carbon friendly approach.   Content Distribution Networks are fueled by datacenters which are often "fueled" by energy sources that aren't so clean.  I'm a bit dismayed that a company that prides itself on not using non-recyclable materials is promoting a carbon unfriendly approach to video video disty. 

    I'm going to pick up a Nvidia Shield TV and see how that works along with a ATV 4K.   I'm feeling too constrained with streamers and this "Just stream everything" when my fastest network at home is my LAN. 

    So people buy the movie on DVD, and now that it's out on Blue-Ray, they magically expect the studios to give it to them for free?  There is nothing to read here.

    I'm not sure I buy the carbon footprint here... it's much less than the old days of stamping-out a billion DVD's on plastic, and VHS videotapes back in the day.  You're watching the 4K movie either on your TV, or computer, or both... so you're burning electricity either way, and the datacenter still remain on and running whether people stream movies or not.
    https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/sources-greenhouse-gas-emissions

    The generation of Electricity in its entirety contributes more carbon than our vehicle emissions.  Data centers are getting cleaner thanks to solar and hydroelectric. The first thing I do in every new home is replace low efficiency appliances and lighting. The wife and I are looking at Solar for our roof. 

    Our children have to clean up the trash the former generation leaves. I’m trying to keep that mess as small as possible 
    Unless you have invented a magical landfill vaporizer, you’re kidding yourself. China announced not long ago they will no longer be taking much of the recycling garbage of foreign countries, including the US.

    http://m.newser.com/story/254010/china-has-stopped-taking-the-worlds-plastic-trash.html
    edited March 2018
  • Reply 34 of 51
    atomic101atomic101 Posts: 134member
    Is there any historical precedent to when we might be able to expect downloadable 4k movies in the future?
  • Reply 35 of 51
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,441member
    jbdragon said:
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! This is one of the reasons why Streaming is so popular. because the quality of the stream is so much lower than from a Blu-Ray Disc, that HD streaming looked just fine to people because of having to small of a HDTV. Hell you could watch a DVD and it would look just fine. Because that's about the quality you're streaming. Same goes with 4K. It's not Ultra Blu-Ray Disc quality, but people can't tell, because the TV's are way to small for the distance they sit. They can't see the better detail anyway.

    https://www.tekrevue.com/tv-screen-size-calculator/

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    I buy all my movies in 4K for around $5-$10. Just bought the new Thor movie in 4K for $10, which is only 4K on Vudu and not iTunes. 
    I just checked Vudu's pricing on the Thor: Ragnarok and it's quite a bit higher than you state, but it is listed as available in UHD for $24.99.

    Apple doesn't have Thor: Ragnarok listed in 4k, again, as you state, but available 4K HDR movies are typically $19.99 or less.
    edited March 2018
  • Reply 36 of 51
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,294member
    linkman said:
    The pirates win again. How do you stream a 4K movie over a 5 mbps DSL connection if that is all that is available where you live? You don't. You say "screw this" and download a pirated 4K version since you have already paid for the content and you would not feel even slightly bad about it.
    Are pirates really providing 4K content? Or are they stating it's a 4K version when in fact it is lower resolution? 
    Yes, there are 4K UHD blu ray discs rips you can download. The file size is pretty large though. Over 40 gigs typically. 
  • Reply 37 of 51
    sirlance99sirlance99 Posts: 1,295member
    tmay said:
    jbdragon said:
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! This is one of the reasons why Streaming is so popular. because the quality of the stream is so much lower than from a Blu-Ray Disc, that HD streaming looked just fine to people because of having to small of a HDTV. Hell you could watch a DVD and it would look just fine. Because that's about the quality you're streaming. Same goes with 4K. It's not Ultra Blu-Ray Disc quality, but people can't tell, because the TV's are way to small for the distance they sit. They can't see the better detail anyway.

    https://www.tekrevue.com/tv-screen-size-calculator/

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    I buy all my movies in 4K for around $5-$10. Just bought the new Thor movie in 4K for $10, which is only 4K on Vudu and not iTunes. 
    I just checked Vudu's pricing on the Thor: Ragnarok and it's quite a bit higher than you state, but it is listed as available in UHD for $24.99.

    Apple doesn't have Thor: Ragnarok listed in 4k, again, as you state, but available 4K HDR movies are typically $19.99 or less.
    There are more places to buy digital codes than Vudu or iTunes. Pretty big market of people buying and selling digital codes. 
  • Reply 38 of 51
    jbdragon said:

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    Handbrake is the tool of choice (I assume) for ripping DVDs.  What's the equivalent for Blu-Ray?
  • Reply 39 of 51
    jbdragon said:
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! This is one of the reasons why Streaming is so popular. because the quality of the stream is so much lower than from a Blu-Ray Disc, that HD streaming looked just fine to people because of having to small of a HDTV. Hell you could watch a DVD and it would look just fine. Because that's about the quality you're streaming. Same goes with 4K. It's not Ultra Blu-Ray Disc quality, but people can't tell, because the TV's are way to small for the distance they sit. They can't see the better detail anyway.

    https://www.tekrevue.com/tv-screen-size-calculator/

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    I buy all my movies in 4K for around $5-$10. Just bought the new Thor movie in 4K for $10, which is only 4K on Vudu and not iTunes. 
    Really?  Whenever I look at buying movies online the new releases are consistently $20.  The only movies available for $5 are random oldies during very occasional sales.  Where can you buy Ragnarok for $10?  I think it only came out in any format within the past week or two.
  • Reply 40 of 51
    tmaytmay Posts: 6,441member
    jbdragon said:
    If you paid for the 1080P, Blu=Ray version of movies, and get 4K upgrade of them for FREE, STOP COMPLAINING!!!!

    Right now, I don't get a crap about 4K. I don't have a 4K TV. Really though, most people that have a 4K TV, they're too small. They may have already had a too small 1080P HDTV, then Upgraded to a 4K TV of the same size, when it really should be even larger than that 1080P TV, that was already to small.

    That's the thing, if you're around 8 feet from the screen, you should be looking at, at least a 80-90" 4K TV!!! You do what to see the better resolution you're paying for right? That is really the problem with 4K. What people will notice far more is HDR. (High Dynamic Range) I know you think that size 4K TV is crazy and HUGE, but not really!!! At 8 feet, 65" is the bare minimum of size you would need for 4K!!! This is one of the reasons why Streaming is so popular. because the quality of the stream is so much lower than from a Blu-Ray Disc, that HD streaming looked just fine to people because of having to small of a HDTV. Hell you could watch a DVD and it would look just fine. Because that's about the quality you're streaming. Same goes with 4K. It's not Ultra Blu-Ray Disc quality, but people can't tell, because the TV's are way to small for the distance they sit. They can't see the better detail anyway.

    https://www.tekrevue.com/tv-screen-size-calculator/

    Myself, I've never been a fan of buying Digital copy's because of DRM (Digital Rights Management) and all the limitations it comes with. It also rarely cheaper than a Disc. So I buy my movies on DISC, and then RIP them into a Digital format myself and then put it on my NAS where I can stream it anywhere in my house using PLEX to my AppleTV locally, or even away from house on my iPad. It's like my own personal Netflix type service. I rip DVD's in the past, but I can RIP Blue-Ray's just as easily. I haven't gotten into 4K. So I don't know if I can do those or not?!?!

    I buy all my movies in 4K for around $5-$10. Just bought the new Thor movie in 4K for $10, which is only 4K on Vudu and not iTunes. 
    Really?  Whenever I look at buying movies online the new releases are consistently $20.  The only movies available for $5 are random oldies during very occasional sales.  Where can you buy Ragnarok for $10?  I think it only came out in any format within the past week or two.
    He's talking about the download codes that are included in the boxed dvd's and BD's. Redbox is selling those as well, and Disney is none to happy!

    Might be some fine print that limits this to the original owner in possession of the disk.
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