Video: See how iPhone 8 4K 60fps video sacrifices some picture quality for higher framerat...

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in iPhone
The iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are the first smartphones on the market to shoot ultra-high-resolution 4K video at 60 frames per second. But shooting 4K at that framerate does come with some visual compromises. AppleInsider demonstrates in our new video.





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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Great video. Very informative.
    slprescott
  • Reply 2 of 11
    Jeez. How many single-purpose digital cameras even come with 4K 60fps video? Yet people are calling the iPhone 8/8 Plus archaic smartphones. Some people are never satisfied.
    cornchipJinTechAvieshekedred
  • Reply 3 of 11
    to the director, you need to do something about the animated thumbs.
    Avieshek
  • Reply 4 of 11
    vadimyuryevvadimyuryev Posts: 168member, editor
    to the director, you need to do something about the animated thumbs.
    👐👍👍
    fastasleep
  • Reply 5 of 11
    Wouldn't the same apply when shooting 1080p at higher frame rates? This should be common sense. Higher frame rates require faster shutter speeds, which in turn requires more light and/or higher ISO settings. Either way you end up with more noise and less dynamic range.
    AvieshekSpamSandwich
  • Reply 6 of 11
    This is why I love Appleinsider! Informative videos. Going in to my settings now to make an adjustment, I will gladly trade the FPS for better video quality.
    edred
  • Reply 7 of 11
    analogjackanalogjack Posts: 1,061member
    This is why I love Appleinsider! Informative videos. Going in to my settings now to make an adjustment, I will gladly trade the FPS for better video quality.

    Now you can make an informed choice. Surprised Apple don't mention it.
  • Reply 8 of 11
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Less light, lower image quality in each frame.

    That's basic photography and has nothing really with Apple or anything. Dictated by physics.

    If the sensor gets enough light that difference could disappear for that particular resolution and light level.
    (so, normal cameras would be better in that regard)

    Shooting in bright sunlight will give you the least difference and it goes down from there.


    You'll get that kind of results shooting at 1080P also (but will show up clearly at slightly lower light level).

    High frame rates require very good lighting for a reason.

    In general, video requires more light to get a good result than a comparative photo. 
    edited October 2017 StrangeDays
  • Reply 9 of 11
    vadimyuryevvadimyuryev Posts: 168member, editor
    The same applies to 1080p and any other resolution.

    It's all based off ISO. 

    If whatever you are recording is bright enough that your ISO is at the minimum level, for both 30fps and 60fps, regardless of resolution, the image quality will be the same.
    The camera will actually increase the shutter speed beyond what is required to darker the image, which could lead to footage looking a little stuttery, but still better than the highlights being way blown out.

    And, pretty much; noise is directly based off ISO.

    Post-sharpening and noise reduction also can affect the amount of noise, but that's a whole 'nother boat.

    On cameras with lenses that have adjustable aperture, AUTO modes would adjust the aperture before adjusting the ISO, since aperture has a much smaller effect on image quality. Although you would usually be on the fastest aperture setting of your lens, which is the brightest and also looks the nicest (More background blur and bokeh)

    r00fus1
  • Reply 10 of 11
    60fps? C'mon Apple, you can do better:


    Don't laugh, it's just a matter of time and scaling up of storage, speed, and computational power to get there. The presenter even joked that it'll be in his phone someday.

    This is fast enough to do depth calculations from optics alone.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    vadimyuryevvadimyuryev Posts: 168member, editor
    60fps? C'mon Apple, you can do better:


    Don't laugh, it's just a matter of time and scaling up of storage, speed, and computational power to get there. The presenter even joked that it'll be in his phone someday.

    This is fast enough to do depth calculations from optics alone.

    The iPad Pro's screen has ProMotion (120hz screen refresh rate)

    They could have easily made a 2.7K at 120 FPS recording option to show super smooth 120fps video.

    Why didn't they?

    Because most consumer computer and TV screens, including macOS devices, are still at 60hz refresh rate.
    Most social media websites still only support 30FPS, with YouTube just recently supporting 60FPS video. 

    It would be stupid of Apple to jump so far ahead in terms of tech.

    It would be a lot of wasted development costs, for only the few that could actually use it. 
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