18-core iMac Pro starts at $7,399, ships in 6-8 weeks, can be maxed out for $13,199

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited December 2017
The start of iMac Pro sales means customers now know exactly how much their custom configurations will cost, and when they are expected to ship. Buyers interested in the top-of-the-line desktop can expect to fork over more than $7,000 for an 18-core beast, though it won't ship until February.




For $7,399, the 18-core iMac Pro has all other standard configurations, including 32 gigabytes of 2,666MHz DDR4 ECC RAM, a 1-terabyte solid-state drive, and a Radeon Pro Vega 56 graphics card with 8 gigabytes of HBM2 memory.
A completely maxed-out, 18-core late 2017 iMac Pro will set buyers back $13,199 -- and actually ships in early 2018.
Just the 18-core processor upgrade will require customers to wait 6 to 8 weeks for it to ship, which would put the earliest deliveries in late January or into February.

Apple's official app also says the machine will be available for in-store pickup starting Feb. 20.

Custom configurations of the iMac Pro include 64 gigabytes of RAM for another $800, or 128 gigabytes for $an additional $2,400. A jump to a 2-terabyte SSD is $800, while 4 terabytes costs $2,800.

Finally, the iMac Pro with Radeon Pro Vega 64 graphics card with16 gigabytes of memorytacks $600 onto the final price.

Apple iMac Pro


With all of the internal configurations completely maxed out -- 18-core Intel Xeon processor, 128 gigabytes of RAM, 4-terabyte SSD and 16-gigabyte Radeon Pro Vega 64 -- buyers will be set back $13,199. Like the base configuration 18-core model, it ships in 6 to 8 weeks and can be picked up in stores starting Feb. 20.

At checkout, Apple also offers optional accessories and software, like the Magic Trackpad 2, a VESA Mount Adapter Kit, and a copy of Final Cut Pro X. Tacking on everything available brings the total bill to $13,926.98, before taxes. B&H Photo, an Apple authorized reseller, is also taking preorders for the 18-core iMac Pro with no tax on orders shipped outside NY and NJ.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 40
    I’m just gonna go find a cash machine... 

    /The Dude
    zroger73markacetopolymniawatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 40
       
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 40
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,058member
    That's...Honestly not as high as I expected it would go! The tower Mac Pros and Power Mac G5s could get well into decent car territory. 

    My only wish is it was more configurable, I need a lot of CPU for my big data workload, but Vega Pro is a wasted cost, while someone training Metal 2 neural nets would go max GPU. Hope the Mac Pro provides that ability to min/max different components. 
    edited December 2017 Solinetmagewatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 40
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,086member
    tipoo said:
    That's...Honestly not as high as I expected it would go! The tower Mac Pros and Power Mac G5s could get well into decent car territory. 

    My only wish is it was more configurable, I need a lot of CPU for my big data workload, but Vega Pro is a wasted cost, while someone training Metal 2 neural nets would go max GPU. Hope the Mac Pro provides that ability to min/max different components. 
    Maybe you need to look at your data workload and see if a change in program will allow you to use more GPU computing power. Most of the supercomputers are using GPU processing anyway so I'd look into your workflow and see what can be changed.
    chianetmagemacxpresswatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 40
    I will order half dozen tomorrow, ops damn im dreaming again....
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 40
    Cue the "overpriced Apple" comments that will also claim you can get the same specs at Dell for $899.95...
    chiaericthehalfbeewatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 40
    rob53 said:
    tipoo said:
    That's...Honestly not as high as I expected it would go! The tower Mac Pros and Power Mac G5s could get well into decent car territory. 

    My only wish is it was more configurable, I need a lot of CPU for my big data workload, but Vega Pro is a wasted cost, while someone training Metal 2 neural nets would go max GPU. Hope the Mac Pro provides that ability to min/max different components. 
    Maybe you need to look at your data workload and see if a change in program will allow you to use more GPU computing power. Most of the supercomputers are using GPU processing anyway so I'd look into your workflow and see what can be changed.
     
    Wrong. Many algorithms are not suited to GPU computing. GPUs are not the be all and end all for HPC. Most HPC clusters are vanilla Linux box’s without GPUs. 
    dysamoria
  • Reply 8 of 40
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,272member
    This is much lower than I expected. I was thinking it would top out around $20–25k with all add-ons.

    I’m just gonna go find a cash machine... 

    /The Dude
    You need less than 1 BTC. Surely you have that. We all invested $100 in BTC when they cost a handful of pennies each, right?
    edited December 2017 netmage
  • Reply 9 of 40
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,157member
    I don't have the historical numbers ... but I suspect that if you compare the inflation-adjusted cost of these iMac Pro workstations to earlier generation Sun, Silicon Graphics (SGI), HP, etc., workstations and factor in the price/performance of the iMac Pro computers these Macs are an incredible value for people who really need the capabilities and performance that these puppies deliver.   
    netmagechiaStrangeDaysSpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 40
    loopless said:
    rob53 said:
    tipoo said:
    That's...Honestly not as high as I expected it would go! The tower Mac Pros and Power Mac G5s could get well into decent car territory. 

    My only wish is it was more configurable, I need a lot of CPU for my big data workload, but Vega Pro is a wasted cost, while someone training Metal 2 neural nets would go max GPU. Hope the Mac Pro provides that ability to min/max different components. 
    Maybe you need to look at your data workload and see if a change in program will allow you to use more GPU computing power. Most of the supercomputers are using GPU processing anyway so I'd look into your workflow and see what can be changed.
     
    Wrong. Many algorithms are not suited to GPU computing. GPUs are not the be all and end all for HPC. Most HPC clusters are vanilla Linux box’s without GPUs. 
    And...most people don’t write their own software. So configuring a machine to match the kind of software I need to use is more realistic than me refactoring Photoshop to better use my GPU. 

    Someday (cue dreamy harp strumming) I’ll be able to buy a MacPro and drop in a card that the Adobe engineers have optimized for the modern features of Photoshop & Lightroom. Isn’t that nVidia these days?

    anyway, until then, the iMac Pro a helluva stopgap measure. 
    edited December 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,880administrator
    dewme said:
    I don't have the historical numbers ... but I suspect that if you compare the inflation-adjusted cost of these iMac Pro workstations to earlier generation Sun, Silicon Graphics (SGI), HP, etc., workstations and factor in the price/performance of the iMac Pro computers these Macs are an incredible value for people who really need the capabilities and performance that these puppies deliver.   
    Or the $10,000 Mac IIfx.
    chiawatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 40
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,491member
    dewme said:
    I don't have the historical numbers ... but I suspect that if you compare the inflation-adjusted cost of these iMac Pro workstations to earlier generation Sun, Silicon Graphics (SGI), HP, etc., workstations and factor in the price/performance of the iMac Pro computers these Macs are an incredible value for people who really need the capabilities and performance that these puppies deliver.   
    Or the $10,000 Mac IIfx.
    Or the $10,000 Apple Lisa in 1983. 
    chiawatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 40
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,491member
    How long before one shows up on Kim Jong-un's desk? 
    GG1watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 40
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,157member
    eightzero said:
    Or the $10,000 Apple Lisa in 1983. 
    If this (http://www.usinflationcalculator.com) is accurate the inflation adjusted price of the Lisa in 2017 would be nearly $25K. 

    We are spoiled and sometimes forget about it.
    chiaStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 40
    My first computer -- an IBM PS2 running OS2 -- was probably one of the finest around.  Certainly head and shoulders above anything the IT company I worked for had.  It cost a bit over $9,000 in the early 90's.
    chiawatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 40
    One of my best decisions I ever made was buying a Mac II in 1987 for $5000 (inflation adjusted $11,000). I'm very temped to buy the $5000 iMac Pro. I don't need the speed but I like getting a Mac that lasts a long time. I could get 7 years out of this one.
    chiaStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 40
    Anyone know how much third party memory of this type is? Am curious how much we are ripped off by having to get it from Apple. I really hate having to come up with these stupendous sums up front instead of upgrading RAM as I decide I need it.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 18 of 40
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,019member
    mretondo said:
    One of my best decisions I ever made was buying a Mac II in 1987 for $5000 (inflation adjusted $11,000). I'm very temped to buy the $5000 iMac Pro. I don't need the speed but I like getting a Mac that lasts a long time. I could get 7 years out of this one.

    I agree with this sentiment, mostly. The problem with buying a higher end system that gives you the power you’ll need for a long time, is the fact that other parts of the systems will become dated. That’s the argument against all-in-ones, if you can’t do the upgrades yourself.

    I bought the highest end 27” iMac core i7 back at the beginning of 2010 (it was the late 2009 model) - I spent $2700. After 8 years, It still chugs along just fine. I have no complaints about the performance of it. But over the years, I had to upgrade the Bluetooth/WiFi module, to get Handoff/continuity features. I removed the DVD drive and installed a small SSD to make a Fusion drive (which gave me a huge performance boost). And also upgraded memory.

    But I am however, stuck with FW800 and USB 2.0, with no option of ever upgrading to something newer. And honestly, it’s NOT that bad, but I do keep my iTunes library on an external HD. And by today’s standards, those buses are SLOW.
    chiawatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 40
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,272member
    dewme said:
    eightzero said:
    Or the $10,000 Apple Lisa in 1983. 
    If this (http://www.usinflationcalculator.com) is accurate the inflation adjusted price of the Lisa in 2017 would be nearly $25K. 

    We are spoiled and sometimes forget about it.
    I was just going to pull up the inflation, myself. I'm using a website that lets you dial in the month and includes 2017.


    Apple Lisa 

    Jan 1983 → Nov 2017*
    $9,995 → $25,209.17

    AAPL
    Jan 1983 Close: 0.81
    $9,995 = 12,339 shares**
    14 Dec 2017 Open: 172.40
    172.40 × 12,339 =  $2,127,243.60***
    Stock growth compared to inflation value: 8438.37%

      * Using the last of the month for each, that's 12,722 days, or 34 years, 9 months, 31 days.
     ** Rounded down to be within initial value.
    *** This does not include Dividends, but I believe it does include splits.


    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Macintosh IIfx

    Mar 1990 → Nov 2017*
    $10,000 → $19,166.20

    AAPL
    Mar 1990 Close: 1.41
    $10,000 = 7,092 shares**
    14 Dec 2017 Open: 172.40
    7,092 × 172.40 = $1,222,660.80***
    Stock growth compared to inflation value: 6379.26%

      * Using the last of the month for each, that's 10,121 days, or 27 years, 8 months, 15 days.
     ** Rounded down to be within initial value.
    *** This does not include Dividends, but I believe it does include splits.




    edited December 2017 patchythepiratechiaradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 40
    Anyone know how much third party memory of this type is? Am curious how much we are ripped off by having to get it from Apple. I really hate having to come up with these stupendous sums up front instead of upgrading RAM as I decide I need it.
    Are you actually planning on buying one of these iMac Pros? If not, how are you being ripped off?

    Anyway, I imagine service centers could disassemble and install the RAM modules later, they are socketed.
    edited December 2017 watto_cobra
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