As Apple's HomePod misses Christmas, Amazon Alexa tops App Store charts for first time

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 83
    danvmdanvm Posts: 791member
    One thing I disagree with is the idea that HomePod is targeting audiophiles. Um no. And that’s why I wonder if there’s a large enough market here for Apple to go after. People that aren’t obsessed with sound quality will buy an Echo or Google Home because they’re cheaper. Audiophiles will have home theater systems. I hope HomePod becomes a real platform and isn’t like the iPad mini where Apple created something because of market pressure more than anything else. 
    AirPods just disprove you. It is the first time people experience high quality wireless audio. Apple has even designed a custom chip for lag free listening experience for AirPods. Do not try to tweak Apple’s product positionings to prove its failure: the HomePod is not targeted to online shoppers, it is targeted to audiophiles. And once released it will shake again that world with its price/performance. If you love the Echo then go for it. It is not Apple’s market nor its concern. Echo cannot prevent HomePod’s penetration. And after HomePod’s penetration we will see the outcome of Echo in those houses with both devices.

    Apple never creates anything because of market pressure. The iPad Mini was a technical necessity, not a marketing necessity. People wanted a lightweight tablet with the same power as the iPad Air. The only way to reduce the weight without compromise was the Mini form factor at this time.
    I haven't tried AirPods, but based in reviews, sound quality is similar to EarPods, and that doesn't qualify as high end wireless audio.  And I don't think HomePod target are audiophiles.  It may sound good for a small $350.00 device, but not as good as a full size sound system which can go to +$40,000 only for a pair of speakers. 

    https://gizmodo.com/for-40-000-this-bang-olufsen-speaker-should-play-so-1735119472

  • Reply 62 of 83
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,802member
    Soli said:
    lkrupp said:
    Amazon’s motive is to get this into as many homes as it can to promote its online store.

    2) In 3 years I've never once bought a damn thing via Alexa. I've also never known anyone who has so you suggest that people are going to do research and buy items using the Echo as the primary reason why it exists it asinine.

    I'll second that.   Love it just for a home automation smart speaker that never says "Here's a website I found"
    argonaut
  • Reply 63 of 83
    danvm said:
    One thing I disagree with is the idea that HomePod is targeting audiophiles. Um no. And that’s why I wonder if there’s a large enough market here for Apple to go after. People that aren’t obsessed with sound quality will buy an Echo or Google Home because they’re cheaper. Audiophiles will have home theater systems. I hope HomePod becomes a real platform and isn’t like the iPad mini where Apple created something because of market pressure more than anything else. 
    AirPods just disprove you. It is the first time people experience high quality wireless audio. Apple has even designed a custom chip for lag free listening experience for AirPods. Do not try to tweak Apple’s product positionings to prove its failure: the HomePod is not targeted to online shoppers, it is targeted to audiophiles. And once released it will shake again that world with its price/performance. If you love the Echo then go for it. It is not Apple’s market nor its concern. Echo cannot prevent HomePod’s penetration. And after HomePod’s penetration we will see the outcome of Echo in those houses with both devices.

    Apple never creates anything because of market pressure. The iPad Mini was a technical necessity, not a marketing necessity. People wanted a lightweight tablet with the same power as the iPad Air. The only way to reduce the weight without compromise was the Mini form factor at this time.
    I haven't tried AirPods, but based in reviews, sound quality is similar to EarPods, and that doesn't qualify as high end wireless audio.  And I don't think HomePod target are audiophiles.  It may sound good for a small $350.00 device, but not as good as a full size sound system which can go to +$40,000 only for a pair of speakers. 

    https://gizmodo.com/for-40-000-this-bang-olufsen-speaker-should-play-so-1735119472

    Of course AirPods’ sound quality may be similar to EarPods, those are in-ear devices, what did you expect? If it has limitations this is because of your analog ear into which you stuff a sound source, not because of the high-end digital circuitry of the AirPods. I don’t buy judging audio quality by the amount of dollars spent.
  • Reply 64 of 83
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,802member
    lkrupp said:
    Soli said:
    smaffei said:
    eskaric said:
    Echo is discounted on Amazon already. Dot by 40% and 2nd generation by 20%. If it was selling so well, why would they discount it around the holidays. Something doesn't add up.
    Actually, they are the prices that Amazon wants to sell them at. The initial prices are to catch folks who will pay to be first.
    I was one of the first customers to buy an Echo 3 years ago. I only $99 when the retail price it went for was $179 soon after. Since then I've bought 3 others, yet I'm excited to see what Apple will do with HomePod.
    And, in fairness, you've been consistently positive about it (as have many others I know).

    Off-topic: I did the unthinkable -- instead of a new Apple TV (an utterly mediocre product), I bought the Fire TV. If I am going to be stuck with mediocrity, I might as well spend $70 rather than $180. Also, from all I've read, it travels better (both at home and abroad). My first ever Amazon product!
    Well, I have a Fire Stick (for the Prime app) plugged into one HDMI port and an Apple TV plugged into another port. The Fire Stick is a dog compared to the Apple TV. It’s slow, the remote is barely functional and double clicks all the time but I used it until Amazon released the Prime app for the ATV. I also have an Echo Dot sitting right next to my iPhone 6 dock and here is a typical exchange that happens all to often. “Alexa, turn on the porch light.” The blue lights spin for a few seconds and I get “I’m sorry the porch light is not responding. So “Hey Siri, turn on the porch light. A few seconds go by, the light turns on and I get “Okay the porch light is on.” So I have two Amazon products and Prime in actual use right along side my Apple products for comparison. And from my experience there is no comparison.
    "iPhone 6 dock"???   Don't you have an iPhone 8 or X?   So I will assume that you won't be getting an HomePod despite attacking others for saying price is a consideration when considering this products.    Truly Hilarious. 
  • Reply 65 of 83
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,802member
    I dunno... The HomePod seems to be a product without a defined market.
    I really though that the HomePod was aimed at SONOS multi-room audio.   Of course Apple has only announced one product model.   To me the HomePod looks more like a Play One than a Play 3.    Hopefully Apple will develop a bigger model HomePodPro and a HomePodTheater models.    Ideally one system could play music/audio from your PC, TV,  iPhone, IPad, or Internet Service.

    I wonder if part of the reason there is a delay in the HomePod is because they are building multi-user (each member of a family) support into both iOS for the iPad and tvOS.

     
  • Reply 66 of 83
    danvmdanvm Posts: 791member
    danvm said:
    One thing I disagree with is the idea that HomePod is targeting audiophiles. Um no. And that’s why I wonder if there’s a large enough market here for Apple to go after. People that aren’t obsessed with sound quality will buy an Echo or Google Home because they’re cheaper. Audiophiles will have home theater systems. I hope HomePod becomes a real platform and isn’t like the iPad mini where Apple created something because of market pressure more than anything else. 
    AirPods just disprove you. It is the first time people experience high quality wireless audio. Apple has even designed a custom chip for lag free listening experience for AirPods. Do not try to tweak Apple’s product positionings to prove its failure: the HomePod is not targeted to online shoppers, it is targeted to audiophiles. And once released it will shake again that world with its price/performance. If you love the Echo then go for it. It is not Apple’s market nor its concern. Echo cannot prevent HomePod’s penetration. And after HomePod’s penetration we will see the outcome of Echo in those houses with both devices.

    Apple never creates anything because of market pressure. The iPad Mini was a technical necessity, not a marketing necessity. People wanted a lightweight tablet with the same power as the iPad Air. The only way to reduce the weight without compromise was the Mini form factor at this time.
    I haven't tried AirPods, but based in reviews, sound quality is similar to EarPods, and that doesn't qualify as high end wireless audio.  And I don't think HomePod target are audiophiles.  It may sound good for a small $350.00 device, but not as good as a full size sound system which can go to +$40,000 only for a pair of speakers. 

    https://gizmodo.com/for-40-000-this-bang-olufsen-speaker-should-play-so-1735119472

    Of course AirPods’ sound quality may be similar to EarPods, those are in-ear devices, what did you expect?
    From AirPods I expect, at most, average sound, not high quality wireless, as you posted.

    If it has limitations this is because of your analog ear into which you stuff a sound source, not because of the high-end digital circuitry of the AirPods. I don’t buy judging audio quality by the amount of dollars spent.

    AirPods don't have high end circuitry for sound, since they are the same as EarPods.  And the B&O speakers I posted, was just an example of a real high end speaker.  Audiophiles aren't looking for a $350.00 HomePod to hear 256kbps songs from Apple Music. 


  • Reply 67 of 83
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 722editor
    eskaric said:
    Echo is discounted on Amazon already. Dot by 40% and 2nd generation by 20%. If it was selling so well, why would they discount it around the holidays. Something doesn't add up.
    They always discount for holiday sales to juice adoption. This isn't about a short term profit, it's about longer-term platform dominance by amassing the largest number of users they can. If everyone gets one, third parties will feel the pressure to make things compatible with it, the network effect takes over, Amazon cements themselves in a leadership place for years. Google's doing it also with the Home Mini speaker. They're in the same race for network effects.

    Speaking of which, I have an Echo Dot set up at my in-laws' house, it was given to them this week. 
    It controls their Tadoº smart air conditioning controller, and their Logi Harmony Hub remote control for all their home A/V. Alternatively, they would use apps or the physical harmony remote. Now they can do the same, more quickly, by voice. Changing channels is lightning-quick. And, when I get back home, I can install one in our house and we can have audio calls between them. Currently, we Facetime call. Even if we don't use the messaging or calling features, the result is something that's currently not possible with HomeKit, and wouldn't work with HomePod. Logitech is not HomeKit compatible without using a Raspberry Pi and HomeBridge. 

    The difficulty with voice driven systems is the requirement for magic syntax. These are problems that the voice assistant needs to overcome. 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 68 of 83
    vmarks said:
    eskaric said:
    Echo is discounted on Amazon already. Dot by 40% and 2nd generation by 20%. If it was selling so well, why would they discount it around the holidays. Something doesn't add up.
    They always discount for holiday sales to juice adoption. This isn't about a short term profit, it's about longer-term platform dominance by amassing the largest number of users they can. If everyone gets one, third parties will feel the pressure to make things compatible with it, the network effect takes over, Amazon cements themselves in a leadership place for years. Google's doing it also with the Home Mini speaker. They're in the same race for network effects.

    Speaking of which, I have an Echo Dot set up at my in-laws' house, it was given to them this week. 
    It controls their Tadoº smart air conditioning controller, and their Logi Harmony Hub remote control for all their home A/V. Alternatively, they would use apps or the physical harmony remote. Now they can do the same, more quickly, by voice. Changing channels is lightning-quick. And, when I get back home, I can install one in our house and we can have audio calls between them. Currently, we Facetime call. Even if we don't use the messaging or calling features, the result is something that's currently not possible with HomeKit, and wouldn't work with HomePod. Logitech is not HomeKit compatible without using a Raspberry Pi and HomeBridge. 

    The difficulty with voice driven systems is the requirement for magic syntax. These are problems that the voice assistant needs to overcome. 
    Clearly, at the moment, Apple is an also-ran on its ambition to capture the family room. Some of the others, while by no means perfect and still lack the ecosystem, have pulled ahead. 
  • Reply 69 of 83

    Do not think that Apple having their smart speaker on the market would have impacted much. You have to remember that this vaunted "Apple ecosystem" thing is mostly hype. The vast majority of people in this alleged "ecosystem" only own 1 Apple device or at most two. Meaning that they may own an iPod or iPad or a MacBook, but few is the household that owns all 3, and even fewer is the household that owns other devices like the Apple Watch and the Apple TV. 
    I’d love to know what your source is for this. 

    I touched upon this point few months back and asked it as a question - Aren't majority of people in Apple's ecosystem own only 1 Apple device (i.e. iPhone)? I also made some reasonable assumptions in terms of "Active" number of devices in each category to discuss about this.

    iPhones - About 1 to 1.2 billion

    iPads - About 200 million

    Macs - About 150 million

    Apple Watch - About 50 million

    Airpods - About 10 million


    Looking at the approximate numbers, it is very clear that the Apple's ecosystem is centered around 1device, i.e. iPhones. Few people pointed out the fact that a Family would own just 1 Mac (any variant), but would have at least 2 iPhones or even more. Even considering this fact, the majority of Apple users would have just 1 device, i.e. still the iPhone and nothing else. So everyone within Apple's ecosystem owning every Apple's hardware product is definitely a myth.

    gatorguy
  • Reply 70 of 83
    smaffei said:
    [...] HomePod will be 2018's equivalent of iPod H-Fi. Only the rabidly faithful will buy it and defend their purchase. Everyone else (with sense) will be telling Alexa to play something on Spotify.
    So anyone who doesn't share your priorities lacks sense? That's a peculiar, if not utterly arrogant, perception.

    There are good reasons for choosing a HomePod over an Echo. The biggest and most obvious is almost certainly drastically better sound quality. I say "almost certainly" because it could hardly miss. My wife's iPad Pro sounds better than the Echo.

    There's also integration with other Apple devices already in one's ecosystem. In our house, since we already have iPhones and Apple TVs, there are benefits to choosing a product made by Apple over one from another supplier.

    There are undoubtedly other reasons that matter to other people. The bottom line is that the criteria YOU use to evaluate value are not necessarily the same as everyone else's, and someone choosing something other than what you would doesn't mean their choice is wrong or that you're smarter than they are.
  • Reply 71 of 83
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,151member
    I think there's some confusion around what the Apple "ecosystem" really is. Apple's customers and products are not the only elements of the Apple ecosystem, just like humans and canned luncheon meat are only elements in the natural ecosystem in which humans exist. Apple's ecosystem includes everything that surrounds, supports, and sustains the entirety of Apple's products and services. A small sampling includes: customers who purchase products from Apple, the vast number of vendors who make products, accessories, and/or services that work with Apple's products/services (including a dedicated percentage of network providers like AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, etc.), the entirety of Apple's supply chain (all in-house, partner, third party suppliers, etc.), the entirety of Apple's sales channel (all in-house, partner, affiliates, third party, resellers, Apple stores, dedicated percentage of brick & mortar and online retailers, etc.), the entirety of Apple's developer network (all in-house, partner, subcontracted, components, Apple developer network, etc.), the entirety of Apple's manufacturing and operations (in-house, percentage of contracted manufacturing capacity, etc.), the entirety of Apple's knowledge sources (Apple supplied resources, aligned university programs, private training operations, books, magazines, online forums like AI, etc.), the entirety of Apple's support channels (all in-house, partner, third party support service, spare/replacement parts supply channel, etc.),  and of course all of the Apple and third party products.  

    Yes, this is a massive, deep, and broad system. In my humble opinion, if you had to distill it down to the most defining characteristic that makes Apple's ecosystem truly a "system" rather than simply a single vendor's product line with a captive population of customers, I'd have to say it is the broad discretionary and mutually beneficial participation of third parties in many of the creative, supportive, and sustaining aspects of the system/ecosystem - at all levels. 
    argonaut
  • Reply 72 of 83
    eskaric said:
    Echo is discounted on Amazon already. Dot by 40% and 2nd generation by 20%. If it was selling so well, why would they discount it around the holidays. Something doesn't add up.
    Maybe just to get more people to buy it? thats usually what happens when products are on offer, especially around this time of year.
  • Reply 73 of 83
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,961member
    smaffei said:
    zroger73 said:
    For Apple's sake, they better have a significantly superior product to overcome the popularity Amazon's Echo has gained.
    The echo is cheap. I’m sure a lot of purchases are people just trying it out because the cost of entry is low. But is this the next big thing or is it another cheap fitness tracker that gets shoved in a drawer after a few months?
    Sounds like someone is butthurt over the fact that Apple completely missed this market and no chance of ever catching up. 

    HomePod will be 2018's equivalent of iPod H-Fi. Only the rabidly faithful will buy it and defend their purchase. Everyone else (with sense) will be telling Alexa to play something on Spotify.
    Bahahaha...yeah along with iPod, iPad, iPhone, Apple Watch, etc...all of which were release far into the game and guess who came out on top in the end of each category? It doesn't matter who is first, it matters more who does it better. Apple is never about selling the most of something. Hell they've always lost that game and continue to do so, even with phones. 

    You and a lot of people need to stop comparing HomePod to these $50 speakers. Just because they're both speakers you can talk to doesn't mean they directly compete against each other. They're in two totally different markets. 
  • Reply 74 of 83
    macxpress said:
    smaffei said:
    zroger73 said:
    For Apple's sake, they better have a significantly superior product to overcome the popularity Amazon's Echo has gained.
    The echo is cheap. I’m sure a lot of purchases are people just trying it out because the cost of entry is low. But is this the next big thing or is it another cheap fitness tracker that gets shoved in a drawer after a few months?
    Sounds like someone is butthurt over the fact that Apple completely missed this market and no chance of ever catching up. 

    HomePod will be 2018's equivalent of iPod H-Fi. Only the rabidly faithful will buy it and defend their purchase. Everyone else (with sense) will be telling Alexa to play something on Spotify.
    Bahahaha...yeah along with iPod, iPad, iPhone, Apple Watch, etc...all of which were release far into the game and guess who came out on top in the end of each category? It doesn't matter who is first, it matters more who does it better. Apple is never about selling the most of something. Hell they've always lost that game and continue to do so, even with phones. 

    You and a lot of people need to stop comparing HomePod to these $50 speakers. Just because they're both speakers you can talk to doesn't mean they directly compete against each other. They're in two totally different markets. 
    I get your point and I agree, but do your examples support your argument? iPod, iPhone, and iPad were all the first of their kind. were they not?
  • Reply 75 of 83
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 4,178member
    dachar said:
    I wonder why Apple announced the HomePod when they did and yet months later nothing has appeared. Was it a spoiler against Amazon and Google’s products ? 
    Look at it another way. Anyone who was really into the HomePod idea would have held off buying from competitors this Christmas. It makes sense from a marketing perspective and takes potential sales away from the competition.

    Apple had previously stated that an assistant on a speaker wasn't something they thought would be a win. By announcing and previewing the HomePod they sent a clearer message.

    I think the alternative route of keeping it secret until ready wouldn't have been the best way to deliver this product given the products already on the market.

    Apologies if this has already been mentioned. I drafted this but didn't get round to posting. Since then lots of comments have been made.
  • Reply 76 of 83
    lkrupp said:
    [...] Amazon’s motive here is not to give customers this amazing device for a low price out of altruism. Amazon’s motive is to get this into as many homes as it can to promote its online store.
    Probably true. Is that a problem?

    I'm having a hard time figuring out how this is bad for me as a user. I already buy many things from Amazon, so having an even easier way to do that is actually kinda nice. It's not like I'm suddenly going to lose my ability to apply basic reasoning to my purchases, so I'm not going to start using Amazon for things I would normally buy elsewhere, or start buying things I otherwise wouldn't. It's just another way to access something I already use. Plus I get a nifty little voice controlled device for doing other things at a low price.

    Amazon's motives are almost irrelevant to the person buying the Echo. The bottom line is that I get an inexpensive and useful product.

    None of that is intended to suggest that Apple should do the same thing, or that Amazon's model affects the value of the HomePod in any way. I'm just saying that Amazon's approach is perfectly valid, and seems like a win-win since both Amazon and the user benefit.
  • Reply 77 of 83

    512ke said:
    [...] I hope Apple's entry into this space doesn't require to to subscribe to Apple Music in order to offer a robust song selection. 
    My experience with my new Apple TV 4K has me worried about the HomePod.

    My Apple TV completely ignores my local library. Despite an episode of a show I requested being on the Home Shared Mac, the Apple TV brought up an offer to buy it on the iTunes Store.

    I have a few hundred movies and over 3000 TV episodes ripped from DVD and Blu-Ray, plus hundreds of videos we shot and edited ourselves, all loaded into a Mac dedicated to serving them up to the TV in the living room. I can still access them by manually navigating to them via the "Computers" icon on the Apple TV home screen, but the fact that Siri doesn't recognize them makes me wonder if I'll be able to conveniently use the HomePod to play my local library.
    argonaut
  • Reply 78 of 83
    danvm said:
    One thing I disagree with is the idea that HomePod is targeting audiophiles. Um no. And that’s why I wonder if there’s a large enough market here for Apple to go after. People that aren’t obsessed with sound quality will buy an Echo or Google Home because they’re cheaper. Audiophiles will have home theater systems. I hope HomePod becomes a real platform and isn’t like the iPad mini where Apple created something because of market pressure more than anything else. 
    AirPods just disprove you. It is the first time people experience high quality wireless audio. Apple has even designed a custom chip for lag free listening experience for AirPods. Do not try to tweak Apple’s product positionings to prove its failure: the HomePod is not targeted to online shoppers, it is targeted to audiophiles. And once released it will shake again that world with its price/performance. If you love the Echo then go for it. It is not Apple’s market nor its concern. Echo cannot prevent HomePod’s penetration. And after HomePod’s penetration we will see the outcome of Echo in those houses with both devices.

    Apple never creates anything because of market pressure. The iPad Mini was a technical necessity, not a marketing necessity. People wanted a lightweight tablet with the same power as the iPad Air. The only way to reduce the weight without compromise was the Mini form factor at this time.
    I haven't tried AirPods, but based in reviews, sound quality is similar to EarPods, and that doesn't qualify as high end wireless audio.  And I don't think HomePod target are audiophiles.  It may sound good for a small $350.00 device, but not as good as a full size sound system which can go to +$40,000 only for a pair of speakers. 

    https://gizmodo.com/for-40-000-this-bang-olufsen-speaker-should-play-so-1735119472

    Of course AirPods’ sound quality may be similar to EarPods, those are in-ear devices, what did you expect? If it has limitations this is because of your analog ear into which you stuff a sound source, not because of the high-end digital circuitry of the AirPods. I don’t buy judging audio quality by the amount of dollars spent.
    YOU said the AirPod is an example of high-end audio. The AirPod sounds the same as the EarPod. That means that unless you think the EarPod is also an example of high-end audio, your example of the AirPod being a high-end audio device doesn't survive a basic reasoning test.
    gatorguyargonaut
  • Reply 79 of 83
    One thing I disagree with is the idea that HomePod is targeting audiophiles. Um no. And that’s why I wonder if there’s a large enough market here for Apple to go after. People that aren’t obsessed with sound quality will buy an Echo or Google Home because they’re cheaper. Audiophiles will have home theater systems. I hope HomePod becomes a real platform and isn’t like the iPad mini where Apple created something because of market pressure more than anything else. 
    One trap we all seem to fall into is dividing listeners into only two camps: ultra-critical audiophiles and audible-is-good-enough casual listeners. I fall in between, and as such am likely a good target for a middle-ground product like the HomePod. I wonder how many others are in that position?

    I'm an audio engineer. Listening carefully and critically is what I do for a living. Over a few decades I've concluded a few things about reproduction systems:

    1. There is a quality point after which most people won't hear any difference. I can make it technically and measurably "better" but the majority of listeners won't be able to tell the difference.

    2. In any chain, whether it's production or reproduction, there's a point of diminishing returns. Adding 50% to the budget doesn't always generate a proportional increase in sound quality. At some point anyone but the most rabid and affluent audiophile will conclude that a certain increase in performance is too small to justify a certain increase in price. The threshold is different for everyone, but even among those who want and appreciate better sound, there's a limit to what they're willing to spend.

    3. There are many factors that completely SWAMP the relatively small gains that can be achieved with better equipment. The biggest is the room in which the sound was recorded, second is the room in which it's played back. Better speakers won't cure a poor recording or a bad listening space.

    4. Everyone has a certain threshold after which they stop hearing sound quality and start hearing music. Again, that threshold varies from person to person, but for most people, it's not very high. That means that things they can clearly hear in A-B comparisons fade away after a few seconds and don't matter anymore.

    When I first got an HD TV the difference in quality between Blu-Ray and DVD was really obvious, but I discovered that my awareness of that difference faded away less than a minute into watching a movie. As long as there were no egregious and obvious artifacts, I was paying attention to the CONTENT, not the delivery, and didn't really notice the reduced detail.

    The same is true of speakers. When played side by side, people will notice when one speaker is markedly better than another, but absent that comparison, as long as there are no obvious and distracting flaws, they'll just enjoy the music.

    So the HomePod doesn't have to be "audiophile quality" to succeed, it just has to not exhibit obvious and distracting flaws, sound as good as its price tag, and offer something that competing products at a similar price don't. I'm inclined to agree with your expectation of a fairly narrow market segment choosing the HomePod, but then I thought the limited utility of Apple Watch would limit its success, so what do I know?
    avon b7gatorguyargonaut
  • Reply 80 of 83
    waverboy said:
    Unfortunately Siri still needs a lot of work to bring her up to Alexa's capabilities.  I really hope Apple has drastic improvements in store.
    And Alexa needs a lot of work to bring it up to Google Home capabilities.

    If people did their research online then every android user should be buying one of the Google Home devices for the best family experience. Google home recognises up to 6 different users based on their voice and each is linked to their Google account. So adding reminders or asking to find ones phone is a seamless experience.

    As an apple user I don't believe either device works with apple music and certainly wont integrate with an apple account, but if you have Spotify that's a start.

    Google just rocks in software and cloud integration, and I see the pixel has done well in the US over the Christmas period apparently topping the activation charts.

    http://info.localytics.com/blog/googles-newest-pixel-devices-outperform-the-iphone-x-during-christmas-weekend
    edited December 2017
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