Hoping to capitalize on Apple battery controversy, HTC and Motorola volunteer that they do...

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  • Reply 41 of 52
    crosslad said:
    I bought a Moto E to see how well a cheap phone could perform. It was quite good on kitkat but the lollipop update made it virtually unusableand it now sits in a drawer. I also got a HTC M8S which is still on a 2016 security update and will only give about 3 hours of on screen usage. Give me Apples solution any day. 
    Dude, you picked up some of the worst phones for your experimentation. Even with Motorola, if you had tried Moto G series phones, your experience would have been lot better. And Lollipop was the WORST Android version rolled out by Google in the last 5 years. Lenovo should not have provided that "upgrade????" to that Moto E phone, much like Apple should NOT have provided iOS 11 to iPhone 5s/6/6 Plus phones (downgrade in real world). Try a Moto G5 plus or Mi A1 if you are still interested in knowing how GOOD a cheap phone can be. You would be very surprised.
  • Reply 42 of 52
    Very cool! Batteries dying sooner, probably without warning, is a feature, not a bug. Awesome!
  • Reply 43 of 52
    Manqueman said:
    Very cool! Batteries dying sooner, probably without warning, is a feature, not a bug. Awesome!

    I know you are being sarcastic, but it is actually true. People can easily figure out battery issues, if there is a significant reduction in battery life or shutting down without warning, people DO suspect it as a battery issue. Dramatic slowing down of a phone - Not so, until someone is EXPLICITLY told.
  • Reply 44 of 52
    Once again Apple gets skewered by idiots for trying to do the right thing.
    Perhaps they'll go psycho one day and turn off iCloud and sell the company to Microsoft, and serves everyone right.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 45 of 52
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,816member
    crosslad said:
    I bought a Moto E to see how well a cheap phone could perform. It was quite good on kitkat but the lollipop update made it virtually unusableand it now sits in a drawer. I also got a HTC M8S which is still on a 2016 security update and will only give about 3 hours of on screen usage. Give me Apples solution any day. 
    Google recognizes that some Android smartphones have budget components and minimal on-board memory in order to keep the device costs down. That's why beginning with Oreo they've created Android Go, specifically intended as an OS upgrade path as well as an original build for some of those limited resource phones. Nokia is one of the first to take advantage of it, pushing an Oreo OS update to their 1GB ram/8GB memory $99 Nokia 2 currently running Android 7.1. Nokia says their phone will perform even better with this falls Oreo than Dec/16 Nougat. 
    https://www.blog.google/products/android/introducing-android-oreo-go-edition/


    Also of note: Samsung and LG have responded to media questions concerning throttling of performance on older devices with older batteries, and both have said they do not. 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 46 of 52
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,213member
    Yeah with the knockoffs there's no need to extend the life of the handset -- they just stop providing updates in short order. How many stories have we seen on "Knockoff Brand XX No Longer Receiving Android Updates"?
    What about stories saying a company has committed to doing the opposite of what you say? And what if that company sells phones in the millions?

    http://www.androidbeat.com/2016/08/honor-commits-to-software-updates-for-up-to-24-months-devices-us/

    Surely, there would be a base for a legal case at least if they didn't follow through.

    My handset is stuck on Android 6. I knew the situation and bought into it with that in mind. I didn't get it with the expectation of it serving two to three years. My wife did, and paid more than three times as much for the privilege.

    My wife's iPhone 6 (purchased around the same time as mine) has needed a battery replacement and everything points to the fingerprint scanner failing. Mine has gone through daily fast charging for the last two years and still has zero issues. In fact I do not perceive any difference in performance. I'm sure my wife would if I upgraded her to iOS 11. I'll let it mature before I take that decision.

    I could jump on any deal right now and gain in almost everything with regards to my current handset and still be up on the deal economically speaking.

    I see lots of people praising the iPhone X but at the same time questioning if it really throws in that much more than a phone that costs half as much, or even five times less:

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/huaweis-200-honor-7x-is-the-future-of-the-smartphone-industry/

    There are some errors in that piece but  it's just a case of getting 'the gist',  not nitpicking over specific points.

    Would you at least admit that up to two years of updates on a very well specced 200 dollar Android phone could appeal to some Apple users in the wake of the current situation? And I'm not only referring to the battery situation but how Apple nudges users onto major iOS updates while offering no way (or no easy way) to revert if something is a deal breaker for the end user?

    And what about all the talk of the AR/VR revolution and how millions of devices would get instant support with iOS11? Are those AR apps candidates to actually cause the peaks referenced in this issue? I have no idea as I only have iOS11 on the iPad Air 2 and the battery life is dismal. No sign of the revolution yet.

    It seems logical for competitors to try and take a bit of shine off Apple wherever possible. I won't begrudge them that.

    edited December 2017 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 47 of 52
    cpsro said:
    They can't slow down based on battery age, because they have no idea how old the battery is. And why would they slow down an already slow processor? Just let the phone spontaneously crash, until the owner is informed (if ever) that a new battery (or a new phone!) will fix it.
    It’s actually not that hard for the system to read the health of the battery and see that its only 60% or whatever and adjust accordingly
  • Reply 48 of 52
    dewme said:
    I read the article but didn't see whether they actually asked the question:

    "Would you take preventive measures, up to and including temporarily reducing your device's CPU's clock frequency when battery demand exceeded battery supply, to prevent your customer's phones from crashing, knowing very well that crashing could result in the permanent loss of your customer's data?   Yes (  )   No (  )"

    Asking an open ended or theoretical question is a load of crap and total waste of time. Apple wasn't contemplating theoretical scenarios, they were dealing with a real, concrete problem that has very real and potentially damaging consequences.

    Whenever I've run software teams I've drilled into them the mantra that a customer's data is their money and we are responsible for safeguarding it to the best of our ability. Nothing less is acceptable. Apple isn't playing games here for the sake of people to spread their opinions via online forums. They are taking responsibility for their customer's money and livelihoods to the best of their ability.  Repeat - this is not a game. As Admiral Grace Hopper once said, there are times when it's better to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission. Safeguarding customer data is one of those cases.  


    you are cute;)  as a tech person you probably know that you don't lose critical data when you power off the device or your battery dies, right? 

    what argument is that, it's better to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission?? that will surely work in court;)

    edited December 2017
  • Reply 49 of 52
    do these phones even receives software upgrades? I thought that was one of the major problems with android phones
  • Reply 50 of 52
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,816member
    revenant said:
    do these phones even receives software upgrades? I thought that was one of the major problems with android phones
    If you truly believe that you rely too much on what comments you read on AI or other fansites. The editors here would never claim that. 

    There are of course some grains of truth in the claim if you are referring to full OS updates. Yes you can find some number of somewhat "cheap" Android phones that may receive only one or maybe none at all. Even the more premium handsets probably won't receive them for as long or as often (tho phones like the Pixels get device updates on a more regular basis than even iOS) but the meme that "Android phones never receive updates" is a misnomer.  

    A few years ago Google began de-coupling some traditionally integrated pieces of the Android OS from the full versions and offering those updates via Google Play, recognizing that some OEM's cared less about whether handset owners received new Android features than Google did. Over the past couple of years that effort has accelerated so that now a great number of the best new enhancements introduced with the latest Android version, even some security-forward ones, are available via Google Play to even quite old Android phones that the OEM itself may not directly support any longer.  So yes essentially EVERY Google Android phone receives official Google-supplied software updates that were once only possible with a full OS update.

    Full operating system updates are of course another matter where the OEM's are a mixed bag. Admittedly some are horrid, yet even there's pretty inexpensive ones like my out-of-production sub-$400 Axon 7 supported quite well. I rec'd it with Marshmallow 6.x, and have had two full OS updates pushed to it since. Oreo will be the third, already announced as coming. 
    edited December 2017 avon b7
  • Reply 51 of 52
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,042member
    It has nothing to do with old batteries. I have a new replacement 5s due to my old one having a failed battery. This new phone was plenty fast under iOS 10... then iOS 11 came out shortly after I got the new phone. iOS 11 made it run S-L-O-W-L-Y. It seems Apple's solution to having shipped phones with defective batteries is to replace them with equally defective batteries, and throttle the phone's performance in an attempt to avoid new battery failures. Pretty lame.
    The performance throttling was released in iOS10 not 11.  Your issue is likely due to iOS11 being sub-optimal for old hardware which usually gets fixed over time so keep updating. I hope this controversy sharpens Apple up - suboptimal is the hallmark of Android, not Apple and they should delay release to older devices.
  • Reply 52 of 52
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,171member

    Slowing down the CPU on older phones is "not something we do," an HTC spokesperson reportedly said. And a Motorola representative indicated: "We do not throttle CPU performance based on older batteries.”
    ... the spokesperson concluded, “because frankly, we don’t know how”.

    … much like Apple should NOT have provided iOS 11 to iPhone 5s/6/6 Plus phones (downgrade in real world). 
    11 runs pretty great on my & my wife’s iPhones 5s actually. We quite enjoy it.
    edited December 2017
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