$29 battery exchanges for iPhone 6 and newer now available at most Apple retail locations

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 82
    r2d2r2d2 Posts: 95member
    revenant said:

    the friggen battery in our cars have to be replaced ffs, can you imagine bitching at your car dealer because your car did not start and you want a free battery. 


    and, unless my memory is off, most android phones do not see a software upgrade (and they too shut off if the battery is drained by a process requiring more power).

    If my car manufacture introduced an upgrade to my car's SW to cover a dying battery that wouldn't let my car go over 45 mph and didn't tell me what the upgrade did - you're darn right I'd be complaining. And people that compare OS updates don't understand the difference in the way the two systems do updates. 
    cgWerksClarityToSeemuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 42 of 82
    Bebe said:
    matrix077 said:
    matrix077 said:
    HI guys, I downloaded the App, 'Battery Life' (Free-No affiliation)....My SE is fine (Green) but my GF's iPhone 6 is average (Orange).

    Also, my GF's had a message from Apple, Settings>Battery "Your iPhone battery may need to be serviced."

    Best.




    My girlfriend iPhone 6 is bad (33%). :open_mouth: 
    Sorry to read that, Matrix. Does her phone have this message from Apple?

    Go to: Settings>Battery "Your iPhone battery may need to be serviced."

    Best.
    Yes, it has. :smile: 
    it’s normal though. She’s always a heavy user (use her phone all day long). I’m just surprised st how well yours holding up. 
    Mine old 6S+ is 34% per the Battery Life app, but >Settings >Battery> is not showing the message, "need to be serviced".  What am I missing?
    Hmmmm...Bebe. Is your iOS up to date?  Here is the link to complete USAToday article: Sounds to me the next step is take it to an Apple store for a $29 battery replacement.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/12/29/your-iphone-battery-causing-your-smartphone-run-slowly-heres-what-do/989762001/

    Best
  • Reply 43 of 82
    What is the best application to test battery capacity on Mac and iOS devices?
  • Reply 44 of 82
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,514member
    matrix077 said:
    She's a heavy user in the sense that her phone almost always be completely depleted by the time she's back home. I guess that's why her battery is in such a bad state. But now she got Apple smart battery case I guess it won't be this bad again.
    I don't think that's a heavy user, I think that's typical. I'm the only one in my family that re-charges before the battery is nearly dead. My wife just doesn't bother charging until it's about dead (and is often scrambling to find a place to charge, or even charges while needing to use it), and my son just runs his iPad until it's dead (often quicker than he'd like due to games), and then charges it or even uses it while charging.

    I think we (techies) who pay attention to this stuff and are easy on our charging routines are the rare exception.

    revenant said:
    the friggen battery in our cars have to be replaced ffs, can you imagine bitching at your car dealer because your car did not start and you want a free battery. 
    I'd be a bit miffed though, if when my battery got weak in the car, the manufacturer started cutting the horsepower w/o telling me. Apple did a great thing here (technologically), the problem was in how it was (or wasn't!) communicated. And since the general tendency is... my phone is too slow, I need a new one... it puts this in a bad context.

    nrg2 said:
    So in summation, lithium ion batteries are not some error proof energy source and are subject to many variables in how well they function and last.

    As for having an iPhone pop up with messages and such if there are issues with the battery, I think this would be an incredibly horrible way to handle it and anyone that works in support would know why. A certain percentage of people would be sent into a panic seeing it and another percentage would just tap “OK” not reading it and live in ignorance. A more simple means would be to make the battery symbol border on the phone go red and periodically flash to alert of a problem or an overlay similar to the charging lightning bolt of a red arrow pointing down to symbolize lower performance. The battery icon could then also be made to bring up a statistics and health page by tapping on it. 
    Oh, for sure, they aren't error proof, nor do they last forever. But, as your own experience seems to show, Apple's products have been better in this regard. Our family tends to hold onto these products longer than most, and we haven't replaced a batter in the last decade or so. I just sold an iPod touch 2nd gen that I used for years, and it's still fine. I'm about to re-work and sell my wife's old MacBook Air (2010 or 11, I think) and it's still quite fine on battery life.

    Yes, there could be more than one way to indicate it, but the point is that Apple should have done so. By slowing and not telling, that's encouraging people that it's time to buy a new device, not a new battery (as most people wouldn't logically connect the two).
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 45 of 82
    BebeBebe Posts: 75member
    Bebe said:
    matrix077 said:
    matrix077 said:
    HI guys, I downloaded the App, 'Battery Life' (Free-No affiliation)....My SE is fine (Green) but my GF's iPhone 6 is average (Orange).

    Also, my GF's had a message from Apple, Settings>Battery "Your iPhone battery may need to be serviced."

    Best.




    My girlfriend iPhone 6 is bad (33%). :open_mouth: 
    Sorry to read that, Matrix. Does her phone have this message from Apple?

    Go to: Settings>Battery "Your iPhone battery may need to be serviced."

    Best.
    Yes, it has. :smile: 
    it’s normal though. She’s always a heavy user (use her phone all day long). I’m just surprised st how well yours holding up. 
    Mine old 6S+ is 34% per the Battery Life app, but >Settings >Battery> is not showing the message, "need to be serviced".  What am I missing?
    Hmmmm...Bebe. Is your iOS up to date?  Here is the link to complete USAToday article: Sounds to me the next step is take it to an Apple store for a $29 battery replacement.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/12/29/your-iphone-battery-causing-your-smartphone-run-slowly-heres-what-do/989762001/

    Best
    I got the 11.2.1
  • Reply 46 of 82
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,497member
    Soli said:
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    macxpress said:
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    What exactly do you want...a free iPhone? You'd probably end up bitching about that too. 
    What am I missing? @maxit's comment seems perfectly reasonable to me. Apple clearly is trying to smooth over this PR issue by offering inexpensive battery replacements. That is undeniable. The customer, as a whole, are idiots, and those that think Apple was doing something nefarious are acting irrationally—exampled by the class action lawsuits.

    The question is: Why don't you believe this response has nothing to do with calming customers?
    Except the poster is saying like oh this is how Apple is trying to calm down customers??? Like they want something more than this. 
  • Reply 47 of 82
    cgWerks said:
    StrangeDays said:
    It’s never been about driving new phone sales, so no, that is not a loss. I doubt they’re losing money on the battery either. 
    And, you know that how? If it weren't, then why not just pop a dialog directing people to the relatively inexpensive battery replacement to gain speed back?
    Also, if that $29 includes the battery, time to do it, and processing the transaction, they are almost certainly losing money.
    I know they didn’t institute this battery extension technique to drive future phone replacements because that doesn’t make any sense. This should go without saying, but you don’t extend the useful lifespan of a thing that you secretly want people to get rid of and replace. No that’s just stupid. As Apple has said, they want to make iphones as useful for as long as possible. If they tried to cripple things to frustrate people they’d just go elsewhere. iphones have the longest useful lifespan and the highest resale values of any brand.

    And I doubt they’re losing money on the replacements because Apple doesn’t sell things for a loss. A tech earning $20/hr could do several batteries in an hour, four seems reasonable, that’s $5. The remaining $24 seems to be enough to not lose money on the battery cost. 
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 48 of 82
    ClarityToSeeClarityToSee Posts: 30unconfirmed, member
    For me personally and for millions of others, Apple didn’t just break their phones by slowing them down, they broke their trust. In legal parlance, this is called “planned obsolescence.”  If Apple really had their heart in the right place, they would have come out and disclosed immediately about their plans to slow down phones for whatever justified reason there might have been, not three years later after being caught red handed. I have been a life long Apple customer and now I have to watch over my shoulders dealing with Apple like I do with other companies. 
    It’s sad to say that many people including Apple insider can’t see pass their blind loyalty and call it what it is. “Planned Obsolescence” which has tarnished the company image and now trying to fix it with a $29 battery replacement. But for me it’s deeper than that! It’s about the trust lost in the one company that I could always trust to do right by the customers even when they were not looking!
    cgWerkssingularityargonaut
  • Reply 49 of 82
    For me personally and for millions of others, Apple didn’t just break their phones by slowing them down, they broke their trust. In legal parlance, this is called “planned obsolescence.”  If Apple really had their heart in the right place, they would have come out and disclosed immediately about their plans to slow down phones for whatever justified reason there might have been, not three years later after being caught red handed. I have been a life long Apple customer and now I have to watch over my shoulders dealing with Apple like I do with other companies. 
    It’s sad to say that many people including Apple insider can’t see pass their blind loyalty and call it what it is. “Planned Obsolescence” which has tarnished the company image and now trying to fix it with a $29 battery replacement. But for me it’s deeper than that! It’s about the trust lost in the one company that I could always trust to do right by the customers even when they were not looking!
    Completely brain mush. We all know what PO means, and this isn’t that. Making an iphone with a used up battery last longer is the exact opposite of PO. Iphones have the longest useful lifespan in the biz and the highest resale value because of it. Opposite of PO. 

    Only phones with used up batteries which are unable to supply the required peak power draw are momentarily throttled. 

    Change the battery when it’s used up. Just like in a car which can’t crank during winter anymore, or your tv remote. Why is this so hard for you to understand?
  • Reply 50 of 82
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,725member
    cgWerks said:
    matrix077 said:
    She's a heavy user in the sense that her phone almost always be completely depleted by the time she's back home. I guess that's why her battery is in such a bad state. But now she got Apple smart battery case I guess it won't be this bad again.
    I don't think that's a heavy user, I think that's typical. I'm the only one in my family that re-charges before the battery is nearly dead. My wife just doesn't bother charging until it's about dead (and is often scrambling to find a place to charge, or even charges while needing to use it), and my son just runs his iPad until it's dead (often quicker than he'd like due to games), and then charges it or even uses it while charging.

    I think we (techies) who pay attention to this stuff and are easy on our charging routines are the rare exception.

    revenant said:
    the friggen battery in our cars have to be replaced ffs, can you imagine bitching at your car dealer because your car did not start and you want a free battery. 
    I'd be a bit miffed though, if when my battery got weak in the car, the manufacturer started cutting the horsepower w/o telling me. Apple did a great thing here (technologically), the problem was in how it was (or wasn't!) communicated. And since the general tendency is... my phone is too slow, I need a new one... it puts this in a bad context.

    nrg2 said:
    So in summation, lithium ion batteries are not some error proof energy source and are subject to many variables in how well they function and last.

    As for having an iPhone pop up with messages and such if there are issues with the battery, I think this would be an incredibly horrible way to handle it and anyone that works in support would know why. A certain percentage of people would be sent into a panic seeing it and another percentage would just tap “OK” not reading it and live in ignorance. A more simple means would be to make the battery symbol border on the phone go red and periodically flash to alert of a problem or an overlay similar to the charging lightning bolt of a red arrow pointing down to symbolize lower performance. The battery icon could then also be made to bring up a statistics and health page by tapping on it. 
    Oh, for sure, they aren't error proof, nor do they last forever. But, as your own experience seems to show, Apple's products have been better in this regard. Our family tends to hold onto these products longer than most, and we haven't replaced a batter in the last decade or so. I just sold an iPod touch 2nd gen that I used for years, and it's still fine. I'm about to re-work and sell my wife's old MacBook Air (2010 or 11, I think) and it's still quite fine on battery life.

    Yes, there could be more than one way to indicate it, but the point is that Apple should have done so. By slowing and not telling, that's encouraging people that it's time to buy a new device, not a new battery (as most people wouldn't logically connect the two).
    They told, that's the thing... not just plainly enough it seems.
    Also, it has nothing to do with lithium batteries, or Apple device, batteries eventually wear out.
    How fast they wear out depends on usage. That's it. There are no miracles.
    If yours lasted longer than me, or some shmo that blew it up under 2 years, doesn't mean the battery was defective, just means he used it a lot more than you.

    People are not very good at tracking how and when they charge devices (or how they use them) so that's not really surprising.
    Fine battery life for a 2011 device is unlikely unless it got lightly used. My own Ipad 2 from 2011 still works but I wouldn't say battery life is "fine". It is probably about 60% of what it was new and if I ever used it for something demanding (like browsing the web, which I'm not doing much with that device), it would likely shutdown.

    Many people using macbooks use it mostly plugged in, so that's not going to stress their battery much.

    No matter how you slice it, you got 500-800 full cycles, and if you never let it go bellow 20% and don't use intensely it while plugged, up to 1200 cycles (that's 4 year minimum if you do those charge cycles every day).

    Ipod charge cycles are much longer than Iphones (they're not used as intensely since they've got no GPS, no LTE) so they battery will tend to last a bit longer than in an Iphone.
  • Reply 51 of 82
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,108administrator
    For me personally and for millions of others, Apple didn’t just break their phones by slowing them down, they broke their trust. In legal parlance, this is called “planned obsolescence.”  If Apple really had their heart in the right place, they would have come out and disclosed immediately about their plans to slow down phones for whatever justified reason there might have been, not three years later after being caught red handed. I have been a life long Apple customer and now I have to watch over my shoulders dealing with Apple like I do with other companies. 
    It’s sad to say that many people including Apple insider can’t see pass their blind loyalty and call it what it is. “Planned Obsolescence” which has tarnished the company image and now trying to fix it with a $29 battery replacement. But for me it’s deeper than that! It’s about the trust lost in the one company that I could always trust to do right by the customers even when they were not looking!
    The chemically depleted battery slowdown was introduced in 10.2.1. Last year, about this time.

    Lose trust? Fine. But to call a routine that extends the life of the phone by not crashing it "Planned obsolescence" is illogical at best, and willingly false at worst.
    Solimatrix077SpamSandwichdewmemuthuk_vanalingamargonaut
  • Reply 52 of 82
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,725member
    For me personally and for millions of others, Apple didn’t just break their phones by slowing them down, they broke their trust. In legal parlance, this is called “planned obsolescence.”  If Apple really had their heart in the right place, they would have come out and disclosed immediately about their plans to slow down phones for whatever justified reason there might have been, not three years later after being caught red handed. I have been a life long Apple customer and now I have to watch over my shoulders dealing with Apple like I do with other companies. 
    It’s sad to say that many people including Apple insider can’t see pass their blind loyalty and call it what it is. “Planned Obsolescence” which has tarnished the company image and now trying to fix it with a $29 battery replacement. But for me it’s deeper than that! It’s about the trust lost in the one company that I could always trust to do right by the customers even when they were not looking!
    You didn't make your argument at all, this is the opposite of planned obsolescence: back to legal mines where you can "parlance" (sic) some more about things you know nothing about.
  • Reply 53 of 82
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    Perhaps, although no one ever forced anyone to buy a new Apple product. The minute a new device is announced, the feeding frenzy begins, regardless of the condition of the device already in hand.  Although I don’t understand why they couldn’t have warned customers prior to downloading, heck maybe they did.  I sure as heck never read the agreements...
  • Reply 54 of 82
    Here's the thing, good lawyers only file a lawsuit when they have credible evidence worth presenting within a court setting. The fact that Apple responded prior to the court date with well, let's face facts, it's a "product recall", means that there is some merit to the court case filed. Still, leave it to Apple to still charge a customer $30 for a defective product repair. With an ego and bank account like Apple, it's smart to make customers pay for the repair.
  • Reply 55 of 82
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,108administrator
    Here's the thing, good lawyers only file a lawsuit when they have credible evidence worth presenting within a court setting. The fact that Apple responded prior to the court date with well, let's face facts, it's a "product recall", means that there is some merit to the court case filed. Still, leave it to Apple to still charge a customer $30 for a defective product repair. With an ego and bank account like Apple, it's smart to make customers pay for the repair.
    This is a bizarre interpretation. Batteries are consumable from the get-go. There is no "defective" about it.

    And "good lawyers only file a lawsuit when they have credible evidence" is accurate. Take out the word "good" and that's what we've got now.
    edited December 2017 cgWerksmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 56 of 82
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,514member
    StrangeDays said:
    I know they didn’t institute this battery extension technique to drive future phone replacements because that doesn’t make any sense. This should go without saying, but you don’t extend the useful lifespan of a thing that you secretly want people to get rid of and replace. No that’s just stupid. ...
    ...
    And I doubt they’re losing money on the replacements because Apple doesn’t sell things for a loss. A tech earning $20/hr could do several batteries in an hour, four seems reasonable, that’s $5. The remaining $24 seems to be enough to not lose money on the battery cost. 
    Well, a crashing phone, while it does prompt getting a new one, does hurt the brand. But, a prompt to fix the battery to regain speed also delays updating. So, middle ground... do it and don't tell anyone. The problem is, they got caught. They normally wouldn't lose money... but in this case they might, as it's damage control.

    BTW, when you run a business, the minimum you shoot for in terms of what an employee brings in for the company is roughly 3x... so if they are making $20/hr, they want to be earning Apple $60/hr minimum... so $60/4 = $15 as a more reasonable labor cost. Then there is overhead, etc., though the battery maybe only costs them a few dollars. Maybe they aren't losing money, but they are losing a lot of profit they'd have made at $79. This wasn't a planned or intended move.

    foggyhill said:
    ... People are not very good at tracking how and when they charge devices (or how they use them) so that's not really surprising.
    Fine battery life for a 2011 device is unlikely unless it got lightly used. ...
    It was my wife's MBA.... who, as mentioned, is quite hard on devices and doesn't really pay any attention to not running stuff down before charging. That said, the 20% left warning probably gets people like her to plug it back in, so maybe she doesn't often take it to 0% like my son does with his iPads. I can't recall what year my son's iPad mini (original) was that we just sold, but the battery on it seemed quite good too. While I didn't measure them in time against new, they were plenty useful and no crashing or anything like that. It's possible instead of, say, 10 hours, they only get 8 or 9 now.... that's the kind of degradation I expect. This 'battery totally failing after a couple years' sounds more like NiCad days.

    Mike Wuerthele said:
    Lose trust? Fine. But to call a routine that extends the life of the phone by not crashing it "Planned obsolescence" is illogical at best, and willingly false at worst.
    For sure, planned obsolesce isn't the right term for sure... maybe more something like 'optimized stability and upgrade encouragement.'
    Look, it's pretty simple. The slower your device starts to feel, the more likely you are to want a new one. Who in their right mind would imagine their device is getting slower because their battery is older?

    And, I don't believe some rogue Apple engineer just implemented this w/o marketing and management being involved anymore than I believe a rogue engineer just implanted the now infamous diesel scandal at VW.

    This was a decision on Apple's part to increase stability, but not tell the user. And, as far as I see, the possibilities are either Apple's general tendency to keep users in the dark, OR it was quite purposely not revealed because marketing either thought it sounded negative, or it would promote battery replacement instead of device replacement. If the former, hopefully they will one day, eventually learn their lesson, if the latter... it isn't all that different from planned obsolescence in actual outcome (even if that isn't the proper term).

    Here's the thing, good lawyers only file a lawsuit when they have credible evidence worth presenting within a court setting.
    Heh, Mike beat me to it... but maybe replace 'good' with 'opportunistic' and 'attention seeking' and you'd probably be closer. :)
    I don't think there is any kind of legal case here, just stupidity or lack of foresight (being gracious).
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 57 of 82
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,514member
    An interesting point was brought up on No Agenda today, that maybe these lawsuits are an attempt to go into discovery re: Apple (if they get that far). That could uncover all sorts of stuff Apple wouldn't want revealed.
  • Reply 58 of 82
    ClarityToSeeClarityToSee Posts: 30unconfirmed, member
    Change the battery when it’s used up. Just like in a car which can’t crank during winter anymore, or your tv remote. Why is this so hard for you to understand?
    Comparing car batteries to phone batteries is simply not the same and a lazy way to compare. For one, car companies don't go around throttling and slowing down car engines because they cannot.  Secondly, it wasn't what Apple did, it was how they did it!  Although, I can't agree with reasoning of whatever they did to slow down the phones.  Performance is VERY IMPORTANT to people, especially when their phones are getting OLDER, and they want to squeeze in a little extra time from their investment or maybe replace a battery if need be. You don't go around slowing down people's phones without telling them that you are slowing down their phones and how it might impact them, especially if it can render their whole device obsolete and useless prematurely, whatever reason you might have deemed noble and noteworthy in your mind.  This affected me personally, I couldn't understand at first why my Iphone 6 was dying prematurely and randomly at 90%, 80%, 70% and 44% etc., and then the performance got painfully slow to the point of freezing when not connected to the charger directly. Then it started happening to my friends and family.  It got extremely painful to launch simple everyday apps like Maps, Safari and Mail. And this was only after two years of owning the phone that I couldn't launch apps without extreme pain.
    To further expand, Apple wasn’t transparent about what they were doing, me and my friends and relatives have already plunked down thousands of dollars on new Iphones thinking that it was a processor issue, after all I had no reason to believe that replacing the battery would fix my performance issues.  Would you fix your tires if there was a leak in your roof? Of course not, you would fix the roof. Now multiply millions of confused and uninformed customers replacing their iPhones prematurely resulting in billions of dollars in additional revenues for Apple.  Do you still think that it was completely innocent on Apple’s part when they conveniently left out explaining the part about slowing down people's phones when they did it?  
    This is the textbook definition of "Planned Obsolescence." I take no joy in berating a company that I love, but if you are too naive to ask the tough questions, then let others do the asking who can be more subjective in the matter than be hostage to blind loyalty with distorted reasoning. 
    edited December 2017 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 59 of 82
    Soli said:
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    macxpress said:
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    What exactly do you want...a free iPhone? You'd probably end up bitching about that too. 
    What am I missing? @maxit's comment seems perfectly reasonable to me. Apple clearly is trying to smooth over this PR issue by offering inexpensive battery replacements. That is undeniable. The customer, as a whole, are idiots, and those that think Apple was doing something nefarious are acting irrationally—exampled by the class action lawsuits.

    The question is: Why don't you believe this response has nothing to do with calming customers?
    If this was any other industry, any and every other company would rightfully be sued. Iphone 6 was always considered to be a defective product with Touch Disease, Bendy housings, and now Apple admitted to slowing down the phone to reduce stress on the battery. Recently, a big automobile manufacturer performed similar lies to the US Government about emissions testing; in turn, it gained favor with customers because the product was advertised to exceed a certain standard. If you enjoy being lied to, then perhaps Apple is just the product for you. For everyone else, this is a defective product and Apple issued a recall; and customers are also being requested to share the costs of a battery replacement which likely costs Apple between $5-7 because of the company's size. If you think customers don't have the right to have a well-made product that functions for more than a product cycle-length in time, you must have very low standards for yourself, or an Apple shareholder..
    ClarityToSeemuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 60 of 82
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,108administrator
    Soli said:
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    macxpress said:
    maxit said:
    This is the way they are trying to calm down customers...
    What exactly do you want...a free iPhone? You'd probably end up bitching about that too. 
    What am I missing? @maxit's comment seems perfectly reasonable to me. Apple clearly is trying to smooth over this PR issue by offering inexpensive battery replacements. That is undeniable. The customer, as a whole, are idiots, and those that think Apple was doing something nefarious are acting irrationally—exampled by the class action lawsuits.

    The question is: Why don't you believe this response has nothing to do with calming customers?
    If this was any other industry, any and every other company would rightfully be sued. Iphone 6 was always considered to be a defective product with Touch Disease, Bendy housings, and now Apple admitted to slowing down the phone to reduce stress on the battery. Recently, a big automobile manufacturer performed similar lies to the US Government about emissions testing; in turn, it gained favor with customers because the product was advertised to exceed a certain standard. If you enjoy being lied to, then perhaps Apple is just the product for you. For everyone else, this is a defective product and Apple issued a recall; and customers are also being requested to share the costs of a battery replacement which likely costs Apple between $5-7 because of the company's size. If you think customers don't have the right to have a well-made product that functions for more than a product cycle-length in time, you must have very low standards for yourself, or an Apple shareholder..
    There is utterly no similarity between Volkswagon and the battery issue. Volkswagon rigged their emissions to conform to governmental regulations. This is not even close to that, and you don't seem willing to understand the situation beyond a knee-jerk response.

    The iPhone 6 is was released in the fall of 2014. Three years ago. The 6 Plus more than two. The mobile product release cycle is one year. If you don't thrash your battery, leave it on the dashboard of your car in 100F or 30F weather overnight, you won't have a phone that throttles in low-voltage situations after a year.

    A battery is not eternal. It can't be. It is a chemical process that depletes with use, time, environment, and customer abuse. The very same tests that showed the throttling with depleted batteries also showed that a phone with a good battery is just as fast as it was the day it was taken out of the box.

    This isn't a recall in any way, no matter in how many threads you say it is.

    I'm not sure why you don't understand that 1) this isn't happening to every phone, 2) it only happens when the battery is chemically depleted from use, and 3) batteries have always, always been consumable items.

    Believe what you want, I guess. Have a nice time with your Samsung Galaxy S8. Oh, did you hear? In a phone well less than a year old, many of them are completely dying if you let the phone get to zero charge. Guess what's probably to blame -- low voltage.
    edited December 2017 cgWerksSoliClarityToSeemacxpressStrangeDaysargonaut
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