iPhone owners will be able to disable CPU throttling in future iOS version, Cook says

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 99
    Surely a better option would be to show a dialogue box warning that, “the battery can no longer deliver peak current and the performance may be impacted until a new battery is fitted”. This should also be reflected in the battery health information - I understand there is currently no indication of this problem at all. 

    Apple would need to decide the most appropriate time to display it, to avoid it becoming annoying. 
  • Reply 62 of 99
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,019member
    uktechie said:
    Surely a better option would be to show a dialogue box warning that, “the battery can no longer deliver peak current and the performance may be impacted until a new battery is fitted”. This should also be reflected in the battery health information - I understand there is currently no indication of this problem at all. 

    Apple would need to decide the most appropriate time to display it, to avoid it becoming annoying. 
    RTM
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 63 of 99
    croprcropr Posts: 1,053member
    chasm said:
    “I demand the right to choose to have my iPhone just spontaneously crash or die on me rather than be FORCED to accept Apple’s alternative of SLIGHTLY slowing it down a bit when it’s under load and the battery is chemically depleted!” This is a perfect example of the kind of gross stupidity produced when gross tech ignorance is combined with bad reporting (in other outlets, AI has done a good job with his IMO), creating mass hysteria.
    "I would have appreciated that the Apple technician did not tell me  in November that it was time to buy a new Phone when my iPhone 6 was slow.  Probably I could have kept using my iPhone with a simply battery switch."

    The difference between my quote and your quote, is that my quote is a real story coming from a loyal Apple customer (my daughter).   Buying a new iPhone has a serious impact on her budget. So she feels Apple has misled her.  I am sure you have much better technical skills than my daughter but with your cynical quote you just demonstrated you are unable to have some understanding for the real customer issues. 

    The question is: who is full of gross stupidity?
    gatorguyuktechiemuthuk_vanalingamlkalliancefeudalist
  • Reply 64 of 99
    tmay said:
    This reminds me of the Volkswagen scandal where cars faked their pollution output when being tested.

    In case of Apple it’s of course not as bad AT ALL, but what both cases share is the fact  someone finds out something that has been ‘hidden’ in software and now is ‘exposed’ to the public.
    Once that happens, you as a manufacturer are screwed regardless of it being to protect the consumer’s devices (Apple) or polluting the environment and screwing over customers (Volkswagen).
    Apple is in the wrong and they know it. They should have added it in their terms of use and expose this in the settings. If people would have known before they shouldn’t have added a setting where you can turn off something that makes perfectly sense to have built in iOS without it being exposed as a setting. But it’s too late now.
    The funny thing is, besides a few middle managers getting sacrificed, and some billions paid in fines, buying cars back and what not, and of course, the fact that many other manufacturers were doing the very same thing, Volkswagen sales have been very good. One would actually think that shifting a large number of diesel cars from the first world to the 3rd world, was pretty impressive, especially since the Eurozone is down on diesel now. All of those cars had to be replaced, and lots of owners went right back to Volkswagen for the replacement.

    Me, I actually think that Apple will come out pretty well on this, and with a enlarged user base (those battery upgraded devices will likely find new life in someone else's hands), but there will be a small, for Apple, financial hit at some point. Think the other device makers will be able to dodge battery issues from here on? I don't.
    Having personally worked on the Volkswagen Litigation, the reason 99% of the people returned to Volkswagen or rather accepted the settlement is that they MADE IT RIGHT by buying back above KBB the car from the user or offered  some cash compensation with a designed FIX and most people either went back to either buy a new model or leave. If the same principles apply here will Apple buy back a defectively designed phone? (AND NO MORE CRAP ABOUT HOW A BATTERY IS EXPECTED DIE AFTER A YEAR) this is simply a design defect.   What Apple has done so far to compare to Volkswagen is admit they altered the software to cut its current capable device power and offer at cost to the user the FIX where as Volkswagen offered to Software fix everyone's car absolutely free. Volkswagen did what it could to win back lost trust. Apple here still looks bad, and it left a sour taste in peoples mouths. So although the loyal apologists will always hang on to the worshiped brand (i.e. Apple, Coke-a-Cola, Disney, etc) the other consumer who loves the device has now lost trust. That will remain to be seen down the road. IMHO.
    muthuk_vanalingamfeudalist
  • Reply 65 of 99
    linkman said:
    uktechie said:
    Surely a better option would be to show a dialogue box warning that, “the battery can no longer deliver peak current and the performance may be impacted until a new battery is fitted”. This should also be reflected in the battery health information - I understand there is currently no indication of this problem at all. 
    RTM
    If RTM means Read The Manual there is nothing in the iOS 11 manual nor in the iOS 11 settings to indicate that an iPhone is running slow due to a battery issue. Many users have bought a new iPhone thinking that is they’re only option and Apple should and could have handled this much better. 

    I have no objection to the iPhone slowing down when the battery is struggling PROVIDING I AM TOLD there is a problem. It’s a good engineering solution, although I am still suspicious as to why iPhone batteries are getting into this state when we’ve not heard of any other devices or mobile phones having this kind of problem. Do Samsung phones do this? Do iPads? 

    My iPhone 6s had battery issues when it was 12 months old. The battery often plummeted from 50% to 10% in just a few minutes and it regularly rebooted. Fortunately I was able to get it replaced and the new iPhone was great. It might not have been so easy if it had been 13 months old and out of the 12 month UK warranty period. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 66 of 99
    cropr said:
    chasm said:
    “I demand the right to choose to have my iPhone just spontaneously crash or die on me rather than be FORCED to accept Apple’s alternative of SLIGHTLY slowing it down a bit when it’s under load and the battery is chemically depleted!” This is a perfect example of the kind of gross stupidity produced when gross tech ignorance is combined with bad reporting (in other outlets, AI has done a good job with his IMO), creating mass hysteria.
    "I would have appreciated that the Apple technician did not tell me  in November that it was time to buy a new Phone when my iPhone 6 was slow.  Probably I could have kept using my iPhone with a simply battery switch."

    The difference between my quote and your quote, is that my quote is a real story coming from a loyal Apple customer (my daughter).   Buying a new iPhone has a serious impact on her budget. So she feels Apple has misled her.  I am sure you have much better technical skills than my daughter but with your cynical quote you just demonstrated you are unable to have some understanding for the real customer issues. 

    The question is: who is full of gross stupidity?
    These are two different issues, though both are Apple's to address. The Apple Store technician should not have said that. Having this control in place would not have fixed that particular problem.
  • Reply 67 of 99
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    linkman said:
    uktechie said:
    Surely a better option would be to show a dialogue box warning that, “the battery can no longer deliver peak current and the performance may be impacted until a new battery is fitted”. This should also be reflected in the battery health information - I understand there is currently no indication of this problem at all. 

    Apple would need to decide the most appropriate time to display it, to avoid it becoming annoying. 
    RTM
    I think Apple finally realised that we’re in an age of wilful ignorance. 
  • Reply 68 of 99
    jony0jony0 Posts: 347member
    tmay said:
    jony0 said:
    A great move by Apple to assuage all the crybabies. My 6S was crashing at least once a week before the fix and hasn't done it once since the fix. I was very happy and will certainly not touch that switch. Well, I might want to prove a point and try it out one day taking videos at home and having a charger nearby.

    All the whining idiots that will flip the switch and turn back their phones to 'sudden crashing mode' might finally understand that Apple was right all along. But of course there will also be the usual unavoidable complainers that will bitch that their phone now crashes unexpectedly while failing to feel any speed increase. Why, I even suspect we might have some here shortly well before the actual update.
    Curious if you have or would consider a battery upgrade.
    I have indeed. I verified if my phone was eligible for replacement and it was :
    iPhone 6s Program for Unexpected Shutdown Issues - Apple Support

    So I called the nearest Apple Store which is over an hour away and at the time they couldn't / wouldn't confirm if they had any batteries in stock ?!? Which was very odd.
    But then soon afterwards the update came along and fixed the issue so I didn't follow up to see if they were managing the procedure a bit better or more Apple-like, figuring that I would revisit this later on before the program ended to maximise the life of the replacement of course. And here we are, the program is almost irrelevant save perhaps the 29$ fee which I might still be eligible to forego.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 69 of 99
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 1,019member
    uktechie said:
    linkman said:
    uktechie said:
    Surely a better option would be to show a dialogue box warning that, “the battery can no longer deliver peak current and the performance may be impacted until a new battery is fitted”. This should also be reflected in the battery health information - I understand there is currently no indication of this problem at all. 
    RTM
    If RTM means Read The Manual there is nothing in the iOS 11 manual nor in the iOS 11 settings to indicate that an iPhone is running slow due to a battery issue.
    Yes it does. Once you get throttled it will show a notification pointing to Settings > Battery. In there it will show “Your iPhone battery may need to be serviced.” Click on the "learn more" and the nicely written informational page shows "In the meantime, you might notice longer app launch times, lower frame rates while scrolling, and other reductions in performance."

    I don't know how Apple can make this any clearer. But I imagine they could make it more obvious with dancing hamsters that require user interaction. For those that ignore the circled red numbers on their home screen icons and never go to settings -- they will not see it.
    uktechieStrangeDays
  • Reply 70 of 99
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    I suppose this was inevitable (given Apple's communication incompetence on this), but I don't think having such a setting is a good thing. But, I guess this is what Apple gets, and hopefully they'll learn from it. Another dent in the Apple brand. :(

    What was really an idiot move, though, was Cook trying to blame this on users not carefully reading the update notes and connecting the dots. Sheesh! Yea, when my device gets slow, the first thing I think of is a bad battery. And, we *always* read every last update note, right?

    Can anyone confirm, though, if the device remains slow while recharging? I had someone tell me that in another forum, and I could hardly believe it. I thought it only kicked in when the battery was an issue... not kicked in permanently once battery troubles were detected.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 71 of 99
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,398member
    So, Apple are adding an option that’ll let your iPhone crash instead of slow down for a short while. I hope the moaners prefer that option. Obviously so much better to wait 30 seconds for a reboot instead of having your phone slowed for a fraction of a second.
  • Reply 72 of 99
    Yes it does. Once you get throttled it will show a notification pointing to Settings > Battery. In there it will show “Your iPhone battery may need to be serviced.” Click on the "learn more" and the nicely written informational page shows "In the meantime, you might notice longer app launch times, lower frame rates while scrolling, and other reductions in performance."
    Thanks Linkman - that’s actually useful but it’s certainly not in the latest iPhone manual and there’s no indication of battery health in Settings on my iPhone which I guess means it’s OK?

    Was this in a release note that I missed? It’s the first I’ve heard about it. 
  • Reply 73 of 99
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    evilution said:
    So, Apple are adding an option that’ll let your iPhone crash instead of slow down for a short while. I hope the moaners prefer that option. Obviously so much better to wait 30 seconds for a reboot instead of having your phone slowed for a fraction of a second.
    It's called damage control.
    Since they f-'d up royally, and probably won't be able to educate users (or the press) on the reality of the situation, now they have to do silly stuff like this.
  • Reply 74 of 99
    For anyone else who missed it, this Apple support article explains the battery warning message and iPhone behaviour:

    https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT207453
  • Reply 75 of 99
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    uktechie said:
    For anyone else who missed it, this Apple support article explains the battery warning message and iPhone behaviour:

    https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT207453
    Am I the only one who doesn't regularly visit my Settings -> Battery and look to see if I have a message about my damaged battery?  :/
  • Reply 76 of 99
    TBH really older iPhones aren’t powerful enough to handle iOS updates. That’s why after 4 years or more, you can’t even get an iOS update. I would imagine a 6S being able to handle it because it’s really powerful, but hey I’m not a super tech genius working for Apple. But if they say it will crash the phone in advance, they’ve problably ran tests on performance. Unlike android companies, Apple actually does plan for every outcome before releasing things. 
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 77 of 99
    tmay said:
    This reminds me of the Volkswagen scandal where cars faked their pollution output when being tested.

    In case of Apple it’s of course not as bad AT ALL, but what both cases share is the fact  someone finds out something that has been ‘hidden’ in software and now is ‘exposed’ to the public.
    Once that happens, you as a manufacturer are screwed regardless of it being to protect the consumer’s devices (Apple) or polluting the environment and screwing over customers (Volkswagen).
    Apple is in the wrong and they know it. They should have added it in their terms of use and expose this in the settings. If people would have known before they shouldn’t have added a setting where you can turn off something that makes perfectly sense to have built in iOS without it being exposed as a setting. But it’s too late now.
    The funny thing is, besides a few middle managers getting sacrificed, and some billions paid in fines, buying cars back and what not, and of course, the fact that many other manufacturers were doing the very same thing, Volkswagen sales have been very good. One would actually think that shifting a large number of diesel cars from the first world to the 3rd world, was pretty impressive, especially since the Eurozone is down on diesel now. All of those cars had to be replaced, and lots of owners went right back to Volkswagen for the replacement.

    Me, I actually think that Apple will come out pretty well on this, and with a enlarged user base (those battery upgraded devices will likely find new life in someone else's hands), but there will be a small, for Apple, financial hit at some point. Think the other device makers will be able to dodge battery issues from here on? I don't.
    (AND NO MORE CRAP ABOUT HOW A BATTERY IS EXPECTED DIE AFTER A YEAR) this is simply a design defect.
    Congratulations on demonstrating that you have no idea what you're talking about. Apple has never said the battery is expected to die after a year. That the battery only delivers peak power for few years is not a design flaw -- it's how batteries work. Since you work in the auto industry you should know this -- after a few years your car's battery is unable to supply needed current to crank during very cold or hot temperatures. Do you whine that it's a battery flaw? Or do you simply replace the battery? Yeah.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 78 of 99
    cgWerks said:
    uktechie said:
    For anyone else who missed it, this Apple support article explains the battery warning message and iPhone behaviour:

    https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT207453
    Am I the only one who doesn't regularly visit my Settings -> Battery and look to see if I have a message about my damaged battery?  :/
    If you were attempting to diagnose the state of your battery's health, I can't imagine why you wouldn't check the settings screen dedicated to the thing you're trying to diagnose.

    Guess you can lead a horse to water, but...
    edited January 2018
  • Reply 79 of 99
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,747member
    StrangeDays said:
    If you were attempting to diagnose the state of your battery's health, I can't imagine why you wouldn't check the settings screen dedicated to the thing you're trying to diagnose. 

    Guess you can lead a horse to water, but...
    If my phone was feeling slow, why would I go to battery settings?
    gatorguymuthuk_vanalingamuktechie
  • Reply 80 of 99
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,826member
    JFC_PA said:
    More user control is always welcome. 
    No, it isn’t.  Choice should only be provided when the user knows best.  In this case, that’s not true.
    Apple are being force to employ false-consultation within their designs and that’s not why we buy Apple.
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