Apple responding to US government inquiries over iPhone throttling

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 27
    78Bandit said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    metrix said:
    I find it disconcerting that people are dying in car accidents from the faulty Japanese air bags that haven’t been replaced because they have a huge backlog and hang ups but yet DOJ is more concerned about this situation. 
    I agree. Which (with such good intent on Apple’s side) is why they should have been transparent about the fact they were throttling speed.
    The moment someone has to discover a correlation between battery health and phone speed, is the moment you are in legal trouble.

    I'm curious.

    When Apple said:

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.

    It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone.


    What did folk think they meant by 'power management'?

    What should they have said?



    My assumption would be they would do things similarly to how the implemented low-power mode and cut out background tasks, stop push notifications, dim the display or other things that would prioritize power to the app I was currently working on.  Cutting performance by up to 50% of my active application would have been at the bottom of the list of suspected actions.

    What they should have said was "Identified an issue where insufficient battery output causes unexpected shutdowns on iPhone.  Peak performance may be reduced by up to 50% to avoid unexpected shutdowns."
    I might add that during observations of my SE prior to a battery replacement, I was seeing drops of performance of up to 66% (from 1850MHz to 600MHz clock).  I have Geekbench results showing this drop.

    That being said, 50% (911MHz) was the typical clock that my 1.5 year old phone would comfortably sit at for the majority of the  day. 

    New battery and the clocks remain steady at 1850ish MHz. Rock solid. Phone is a joy to use again.
    h2p
  • Reply 22 of 27
    Rayz2016 said:
    metrix said:
    I find it disconcerting that people are dying in car accidents from the faulty Japanese air bags that haven’t been replaced because they have a huge backlog and hang ups but yet DOJ is more concerned about this situation. 
    I agree. Which (with such good intent on Apple’s side) is why they should have been transparent about the fact they were throttling speed.
    The moment someone has to discover a correlation between battery health and phone speed, is the moment you are in legal trouble.

    I'm curious.

    When Apple said:

    iOS 10.2.1 includes bug fixes and improves the security of your iPhone or iPad.

    It also improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone.


    What did folk think they meant by 'power management'?

    What should they have said?



    ANY mention of the power management was only added around a MONTH after the update was first available, around the time Apple first announced how many users had upgraded so far. This fact alone makes this statement by Tim, a lie to me:
    "When we put it out, we did say what it was, but I don't think a lot of people were paying attention. And maybe we should have been clearer, as well," Cook said.
  • Reply 23 of 27
    still confused as to why the batteries in the 6 onward degrade so fast compared to older iPhones? I'm using a 4year old 5S just now and the battery is showing as 1400mAh which is 90% of it's original 1560mAh capacity, not bad for the daily use and abuse it has seen!
  • Reply 24 of 27
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,338administrator
    adm1 said:
    still confused as to why the batteries in the 6 onward degrade so fast compared to older iPhones? I'm using a 4year old 5S just now and the battery is showing as 1400mAh which is 90% of it's original 1560mAh capacity, not bad for the daily use and abuse it has seen!
    Capacity and peak voltage are two entirely different things.
  • Reply 25 of 27
    adm1 said:
    still confused as to why the batteries in the 6 onward degrade so fast compared to older iPhones? I'm using a 4year old 5S just now and the battery is showing as 1400mAh which is 90% of it's original 1560mAh capacity, not bad for the daily use and abuse it has seen!
    Capacity and peak voltage are two entirely different things.

    Sure, capacity and peak voltage are two different things. When we talk about peak voltage, what has changed in iPhone 6 and above? I thought Apple takes care of these engineering decisions in the design phase extra-ordinarily well. But something seems to be not correct. Why are the batteries NOT able to provide the peak voltage for iPhone 6 and above, which they were able to provide earlier? What has changed?
    AI_liasatomic101
  • Reply 26 of 27
    AI_liasAI_lias Posts: 278member
    adm1 said:
    still confused as to why the batteries in the 6 onward degrade so fast compared to older iPhones? I'm using a 4year old 5S just now and the battery is showing as 1400mAh which is 90% of it's original 1560mAh capacity, not bad for the daily use and abuse it has seen!
    Capacity and peak voltage are two entirely different things.

    Sure, capacity and peak voltage are two different things. When we talk about peak voltage, what has changed in iPhone 6 and above? I thought Apple takes care of these engineering decisions in the design phase extra-ordinarily well. But something seems to be not correct. Why are the batteries NOT able to provide the peak voltage for iPhone 6 and above, which they were able to provide earlier? What has changed?
    It's bad engineering, covered up by throttling down of the CPU, under the guise of good intentions. Hopefully this is the kind of questions these governments will ask and we'll get a more honest answer than just "we tried to help our users by preventing these unexpected shutdowns."
    atomic101
  • Reply 27 of 27
    Apple has already apologized for the lack of transparency concerning the power management method they used.  They cut the cost of battery replacement by 63%, something that no other manufacturer has done.  With over 600 million iPhones in the wild and the strong likelihood that battery replacements will extend the life cycle of existing iPhones by 2 or more years, this decision will likely reduce purchases of new iPhones.  Finally, Apple has promised to issue new system software that will not only notify people is throttling occurs but also allow people to turn the throttling off.  What more do people expect Apple to do?
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