HomePod teardown needs sawing, cutting to get into interior, but is built 'like a tank'

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 28
    I wonder if it can tolerate a knock off the "high table behind the couch" when the kids bump it.  Can it handle a single-drop in its lifetime? 

    *Probably*, with no desire to test it.

    Perhaps secure the power cord TO the table it's on (out of sight of course).  Then it would hang by its cord for a few seconds; better than a drop!

    Good luck all.

    E.
  • Reply 22 of 28
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,023member
    I wonder if it can tolerate a knock off the "high table behind the couch" when the kids bump it.  Can it handle a single-drop in its lifetime? 

    *Probably*, with no desire to test it.

    Perhaps secure the power cord TO the table it's on (out of sight of course).  Then it would hang by its cord for a few seconds; better than a drop!

    Good luck all.

    E.
    Or just secure the kids, instead.

    • https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/16/578227666/couple-arrested-after-children-found-shackled-to-their-beds-in-california-home
  • Reply 23 of 28
    anomeanome Posts: 941member

    iFixit are mostly concerned with being able to fix stuff, so of course they criticise Apple for making it difficult to take apart.

    But, honestly, how often do people repair their own speakers? I know some audiophiles and electronics enthusiasts love doing that sort of thing, but for the average user, you send your speakers off to sit in a queue in a repair shop for months, or you toss them and buy new ones. They also don't upgrade your speakers every two years just because a new model came out. Again, some extremists do, but most people don't.

    So Apple have taken an approach that seems to assume that people will keep using their HomePods for many years. These probably aren't going to be on an annual hardware refresh cycle. (And, as a  result, expect articles pontificating about how Apple have neglected them, and don't take them seriously if there isn't HomePod 2.0 next year.) I expect the major upgrades for the HomePod over the next couple of years will be in software and services.

    I can, however, see them coming out with multi-coloured versions, or at least covers. A Product(RED) HomePod? Rainbow coloured for Pride Week? Pink for International Women's Day? Camouflage for International Men's Day? Red and gold for Chinese New Year? Red and green for Christmas? Dreidel-shaped for Chanukah? The possibilities aren't endless, but do go on for potentially quite a long time.

    watto_cobralukei
  • Reply 24 of 28
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,813member
    I want to see drop tests. I would bet the HomePod still functions normally after the10 ft drop.
    edited February 12 watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 28
    Soli said:
    You can easily see this was designed by Apple. Here's one side of the Echo Show board for comparison.



    Look at all those test points that is so 1990's from DFX standpoint who does test points these day onboard diagnostics are the way to go today. Look at those cheap ass speak echo uses they, must have call up 1-800 cheap Chinese speaker guy and found some ordinary speaker anyone could have bought. I think i saw those on a speaker supply website.

    Face it, Apple was right these product is in a class of its own with this speaker, you all can complain, it does not have an aux in or something dumb like that. But face the Android boys can only dream about it they can never use it unless they break every promise they made never ever own Apple.
    watto_cobrajahblade
  • Reply 26 of 28
    Skyscraper-like capacitors inside that thing!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 28
    misamisa Posts: 827member
    Soli said:
    One common statement is that it should have an AUX port if Apple really wanted it to last since speakers can last decades. I'm assuming iOS (which I think will get a name change) will be supported for 4–5  years, and then still work for years after that. Hopefully that RAM means it's not another original iPod with 256 MiB RAM, which I think was Apple's only real longevity issue.

    Hell, I was even using a 2001 iMac as a my media server with a FW400-attached RAID (USB was only 1.0 on that iMac) until a few years ago. The OS was Leopard or Snow Leopard, and iTunes hadn't been updatable for many years, but with Server installed I was also able to use it as my Time Machine backup to the RAID for my other Macs.
    It doesn't matter. If it had an AUX port, it would have to bypass all the computer bits. Unfortunately since Apple hasn't decided to adopt USB-C, that leaves just an Analog option, and if you have an analog input, that means it has to constantly be powered.

    Like it's one thing to try and repurpose old hardware, but repurposing old hardware should only be done when the power requirements of doing so doesn't justify new hardware. In this case, unless you're going to buy 6 old versions of them for a surround system, it's more likely that the power requirements of running 6 would not be justified over picking up regular satellite speakers and hard-wiring them, since the power requirement is focused in the surround unit instead of taking up outlets all over the living room.

  • Reply 28 of 28
    misa said:
    Soli said:
    One common statement is that it should have an AUX port if Apple really wanted it to last since speakers can last decades. I'm assuming iOS (which I think will get a name change) will be supported for 4–5  years, and then still work for years after that. Hopefully that RAM means it's not another original iPod with 256 MiB RAM, which I think was Apple's only real longevity issue.

    Hell, I was even using a 2001 iMac as a my media server with a FW400-attached RAID (USB was only 1.0 on that iMac) until a few years ago. The OS was Leopard or Snow Leopard, and iTunes hadn't been updatable for many years, but with Server installed I was also able to use it as my Time Machine backup to the RAID for my other Macs.
    It doesn't matter. If it had an AUX port, it would have to bypass all the computer bits. Unfortunately since Apple hasn't decided to adopt USB-C, that leaves just an Analog option, and if you have an analog input, that means it has to constantly be powered.

    Like it's one thing to try and repurpose old hardware, but repurposing old hardware should only be done when the power requirements of doing so doesn't justify new hardware. In this case, unless you're going to buy 6 old versions of them for a surround system, it's more likely that the power requirements of running 6 would not be justified over picking up regular satellite speakers and hard-wiring them, since the power requirement is focused in the surround unit instead of taking up outlets all over the living room.

    Apple TV and modern MacBooks all use USB-C. Apple uses Lightning for peripherals. Either or both could have been put on this, but it would complicate the design for no real purpose.

    The AirPort wireless interface is far superior to running a physical cable for audio input. That doesn't support use cases such as sending (non-Apple TV) TV or home stereo signals to a Home Pod, but that's not its intended use. If Apple can establish a base of users, it can begin licensing AirPlay to more television makers. AV receivers & other stereo gear from Bose, Bowers & Wilkins, Denon, Marantz, McIntosh, Onkyo, Philips, Pioneer, Sony and Yamaha already license AirPlay.

    AirPlay 2 will offer more flexibility and will integrate better with a variety of HomeKit devices and security & entertainment systems that make sense to deliver audio streams to different HomePods placed around a house.

    Note that Apple formerly put an analog + optical S/PDIF audio output connector on its AirPort Express. Apple has pretty good data on how many people actually used it, that that knowledge is clearly on display in the design of HomePod. 
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