Qualcomm unveils 2-gigabit LTE modem amid rumors Apple's iPhone going Intel-only

Posted:
in iPhone
Qualcomm on Wednesday revealed the Snapdragon X24, its latest LTE modem for mobile devices, with peak download speeds hitting 2 gigabits per second -- though Apple may choose to forego the technology in its next iPhones.




The chip is the first Category 20 LTE modem to reach 2 gigabits, and the first to be made using a 7-nanometer process, Qualcomm claimed. Under ideal conditions it would be twice as fast as the company's previous gigabit modem.

In practice the X24 is unlikely to hit those speeds, at least in the U.S. While it supports seven carrier aggregation, no domestic network has gone beyond three carrier aggregation so far.

The first devices with the chip should launch towards the end of 2018, which would be in time for Apple's next iPhones -- including a 6.1-inch LCD model, and two OLED products sized at 5.8 and 6.5 inches.

Intel is already supplying some iPhone modems however, and it's rumored that Apple could cut Qualcomm out of the loop, given ongoing global legal battles over patents and royalties. In any case there's a chance Apple will diversify its modem suppliers with the addition of MediaTek.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 38
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,730member
    The first devices with the chip should launch towards the end of 2018, which would be in time for Apple's next iPhones -- including a 6.1-inch LCD model, and two OLED products sized at 5.8 and 6.5 inches.

    No. If the chip launched at the end of 2018, the chips would only be available for the 2019 phones, not the "next iPhones".
    racerhomie3SoundJudgmentmuthuk_vanalingamAvieshek[Deleted User]
  • Reply 2 of 38
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
  • Reply 3 of 38
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,556member
    Modem speed is as good as connected to Cellular network bandwidth. Living in suburban area, many time I even don't get LTE signal so having LTE 2GB speed is worthless. First make LTE network bandwidth consistent and signal available before keep increasing modem speed. And 5G is on it's way.
    edited February 14
  • Reply 4 of 38
    Roger_FingasRoger_Fingas Posts: 106member, editor
    mike1 said:
    The first devices with the chip should launch towards the end of 2018, which would be in time for Apple's next iPhones -- including a 6.1-inch LCD model, and two OLED products sized at 5.8 and 6.5 inches.

    No. If the chip launched at the end of 2018, the chips would only be available for the 2019 phones, not the "next iPhones".
    Qualcomm said the first devices with the chip will be out then, not the chip itself.
    Aviesheklolliver
  • Reply 5 of 38
    Apple needs to get a good global chip (works in all nations) with the help of Intel.
    i seriously do not care about useless speed improvements.
  • Reply 6 of 38
    rob53rob53 Posts: 1,912member
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    wood1208 said:
    Modem speed is as good as connected to Cellular network bandwidth. Living in suburban area, many time I even don't get LTE signal so having LTE 2GB speed is worthless. First make LTE network bandwidth consistent and signal available before keep increasing modem speed. And 5G is on it's way.
    2Gbps cellular, whether it's LTE or 5G, means nothing if the cellular network isn't designed to handle it. This is like a car being able to go 200 mph. The only legal places to go this fast are on a few race tracks so why design a car that can go that fast? On Verizon, with anything above an iPhone 6, I've seen speeds above 100Mbps but the conditions have to be perfect. From what I've read in order to get 5G speeds, you have to be very close to the cellular tower. For the vast majority of us, that means we'll never see speeds anywhere near the advertised threshold. Unless cellular providers are willing to provide some kind of mesh network with more antennas, I doubt we'll see these speeds any time soon.

    BTW: @wood1208 it's 2Gbps as in bits not bytes, a big difference in the amount of data being moved.

    --
    Just used Speedtest over Verizon LTE on my iPhone 8 Plus, 4 bars, not in a large city. Surprised I got 59.6 down and 47.2 up. We might have one tower in the area and it's actually as fast as the Comcast connection currently running in this house. When I had 250Mbps Blast Pro! I would easily get the 250 down but only about 13 up. Of course it's early in the morning so the cellular network isn't being hammered. 
  • Reply 7 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,273member
    rob53 said:
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    wood1208 said:
    Modem speed is as good as connected to Cellular network bandwidth. Living in suburban area, many time I even don't get LTE signal so having LTE 2GB speed is worthless. First make LTE network bandwidth consistent and signal available before keep increasing modem speed. And 5G is on it's way.
    2Gbps cellular, whether it's LTE or 5G, means nothing if the cellular network isn't designed to handle it. This is like a car being able to go 200 mph.
    Timely mention of cars. That's where the new 2Gbps chipsets could be highly useful. 
    https://venturebeat.com/2018/02/14/qualcomm-previews-5g-enabled-cars-industrial-iot-and-spectrum-sharing-technologies/
  • Reply 8 of 38
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    It's just Qualcomm saying to Apple in effect... "Waaaah!! If you exclude us from your next iPhones... you wooooon't get this sweet 2Gig DL perfooooormance in your next release. You'll be sooooorryy!!" ... etc.
    Avieshek
  • Reply 9 of 38
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    It's just Qualcomm saying to Apple in effect... "Waaaah!! If you exclude us from your next iPhones... you wooooon't get this sweet 2Gig DL perfooooormance in your next release. You'll be sooooorryy!!" ... etc.
    Not a big deal.  Next year Intel will have its 5G chips ready plus like others have said, the vast majority of carriers won't be ready for wide roll-out of 5G this year anyway.
  • Reply 10 of 38
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,577member
    I wonder how much battery this thing eats?
    Aviesheklolliver
  • Reply 11 of 38
    5G is not far off- it is deployed in S Korea's Olympics currently- and I think I will wait until AT&T has rolled out 5G before upgrading from my iPhone 7.
  • Reply 12 of 38
    rob53 said:
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    wood1208 said:
    Modem speed is as good as connected to Cellular network bandwidth. Living in suburban area, many time I even don't get LTE signal so having LTE 2GB speed is worthless. First make LTE network bandwidth consistent and signal available before keep increasing modem speed. And 5G is on it's way.
    2Gbps cellular, whether it's LTE or 5G, means nothing if the cellular network isn't designed to handle it. This is like a car being able to go 200 mph. The only legal places to go this fast are on a few race tracks so why design a car that can go that fast? On Verizon, with anything above an iPhone 6, I've seen speeds above 100Mbps but the conditions have to be perfect. From what I've read in order to get 5G speeds, you have to be very close to the cellular tower. For the vast majority of us, that means we'll never see speeds anywhere near the advertised threshold. Unless cellular providers are willing to provide some kind of mesh network with more antennas, I doubt we'll see these speeds any time soon.

    BTW: @wood1208 it's 2Gbps as in bits not bytes, a big difference in the amount of data being moved.

    --
    Just used Speedtest over Verizon LTE on my iPhone 8 Plus, 4 bars, not in a large city. Surprised I got 59.6 down and 47.2 up. We might have one tower in the area and it's actually as fast as the Comcast connection currently running in this house. When I had 250Mbps Blast Pro! I would easily get the 250 down but only about 13 up. Of course it's early in the morning so the cellular network isn't being hammered. 
    Your car analogy is terrible. It’s more akin to putting z-rated tires on a Jeep Wrangler. The tires are capable of hitting 180 mph+, but the Jeep isn’t. Just because a Bugatti is legally barred from hitting 250 mph on a public road doesn’t mean it can’t do it physically. 
    lolliver
  • Reply 13 of 38
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 610member
    I totally agree that the practical significance of this is virtually zero in the US, but More important than reality is whether the impression that phones with 2 gigabit modems are faster will affect sales. You can’t drive 160mph, but that doesn’t stop people from buying those cars because they like the thought that they can go that fast.
    lolliver
  • Reply 14 of 38
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,262member
    rob53 said:
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    wood1208 said:
    Modem speed is as good as connected to Cellular network bandwidth. Living in suburban area, many time I even don't get LTE signal so having LTE 2GB speed is worthless. First make LTE network bandwidth consistent and signal available before keep increasing modem speed. And 5G is on it's way.
    2Gbps cellular, whether it's LTE or 5G, means nothing if the cellular network isn't designed to handle it. This is like a car being able to go 200 mph. The only legal places to go this fast are on a few race tracks so why design a car that can go that fast? On Verizon, with anything above an iPhone 6, I've seen speeds above 100Mbps but the conditions have to be perfect. From what I've read in order to get 5G speeds, you have to be very close to the cellular tower. For the vast majority of us, that means we'll never see speeds anywhere near the advertised threshold. Unless cellular providers are willing to provide some kind of mesh network with more antennas, I doubt we'll see these speeds any time soon.

    BTW: @wood1208 it's 2Gbps as in bits not bytes, a big difference in the amount of data being moved.

    --
    Just used Speedtest over Verizon LTE on my iPhone 8 Plus, 4 bars, not in a large city. Surprised I got 59.6 down and 47.2 up. We might have one tower in the area and it's actually as fast as the Comcast connection currently running in this house. When I had 250Mbps Blast Pro! I would easily get the 250 down but only about 13 up. Of course it's early in the morning so the cellular network isn't being hammered. 
    To your point, I am not aware of any cellular networks able to support this at this time and I have not seen a roll out plan for this kind of speed. 

    People need to stop saying its GB when it is in fact Gb there is 8X difference in B and b, 2Gbits is actually 250Mbytes, this is also peek not sustained. 

    This is nothing new for Apple why put in an expensive chip when mass majority of consumers can never put it to use and it just drives up the cost to the phone or lowers Apples margin for something with no value.

    gatorguyPickUrPoisonlolliver
  • Reply 15 of 38
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,242member
    Typical Qualcomm chest-thumping.  It’s banking on the stupidity of the consumer to think these chips will even matter.  

    Who cares that networks in plave by then wont even operate at anywhere near those speeds.

    The sooner QC gets sued into oblivion, the better.  What a corrupt company.  If I were in a position to hire execs, anyone from QC would head straight to the trash bin.
  • Reply 16 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,273member
    maestro64 said:
    rob53 said:
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    wood1208 said:
    Modem speed is as good as connected to Cellular network bandwidth. Living in suburban area, many time I even don't get LTE signal so having LTE 2GB speed is worthless. First make LTE network bandwidth consistent and signal available before keep increasing modem speed. And 5G is on it's way.
    2Gbps cellular, whether it's LTE or 5G, means nothing if the cellular network isn't designed to handle it. This is like a car being able to go 200 mph. The only legal places to go this fast are on a few race tracks so why design a car that can go that fast? On Verizon, with anything above an iPhone 6, I've seen speeds above 100Mbps but the conditions have to be perfect. From what I've read in order to get 5G speeds, you have to be very close to the cellular tower. For the vast majority of us, that means we'll never see speeds anywhere near the advertised threshold. Unless cellular providers are willing to provide some kind of mesh network with more antennas, I doubt we'll see these speeds any time soon.

    BTW: @wood1208 it's 2Gbps as in bits not bytes, a big difference in the amount of data being moved.

    --
    Just used Speedtest over Verizon LTE on my iPhone 8 Plus, 4 bars, not in a large city. Surprised I got 59.6 down and 47.2 up. We might have one tower in the area and it's actually as fast as the Comcast connection currently running in this house. When I had 250Mbps Blast Pro! I would easily get the 250 down but only about 13 up. Of course it's early in the morning so the cellular network isn't being hammered. 
    To your point, I am not aware of any cellular networks able to support this at this time and I have not seen a roll out plan for this kind of speed.
    https://www.worldtimezone.com/5g.html
  • Reply 17 of 38
    ksecksec Posts: 1,497member
    I don’t know much about how cellular connectivity works, but on it’s face 2 gigabits seems like huge overkill.  In the US I normally get around 50 megabits per second download times on AT&T.  Occasionally I’ll see higher speeds than that but nowhere near even 500 megabits per second.

    Is there something non-obvious about a 2 gigabits per second modem that would show immediate benefit when that chip becomes available?
    It's just Qualcomm saying to Apple in effect... "Waaaah!! If you exclude us from your next iPhones... you wooooon't get this sweet 2Gig DL perfooooormance in your next release. You'll be sooooorryy!!" ... etc.
    As a matter of fact, Apple knew this long ago and they know 2Gbps 4G dont sell. The only advantage is more CA means carrier can improves their Network efficiency.

    I think Apple will likely focus on overall Energy efficiency in LTE. There is a lot of unneeded silicon for something 99% of us wont be using.

    Right now I really wish Apple improves their Antenna design in iPhone. Because it is severely lacking behind its competitors, namely Samsung.

    Edit:

    In the old days, Apple will always get the best modem it could get, ( Which is actually one generation behind because of capacity problem ) not only does it sell, it also have great impact to user experience, and it is one way to push carrier to continuously spend and upgrade their network. iPhone users tends to have much higher ARPU, and are more demanding. We have now reached a stage where Apple no longer need to handhold these carrier for their upgrade. Apple now has iPhones that support LTE features carriers will need time to catch up in their infrastructure.
    edited February 14
  • Reply 18 of 38
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,396member
    Okay, what am I missing here? Gigabit wireless makes sense in a fixed location situation like providing voice/data/video to a home or business. But on a mobile device? Why? Downloading a movie might take just a minute or two but it still takes 2 hours to watch a 2 hour movie on your phone or tablet or laptop and you use up the same amount of your data plan no matter how fast or slow you go. As far as mobile goes this sounds like a solution in search of a problem no matter what the neckbeards say.
    edited February 14
  • Reply 19 of 38
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,273member
    lkrupp said:
    Okay, what am I missing here? Gigabit wireless makes sense in a fixed location situation like providing voice/data/video to a home or busines. But on a mobile device? Why? Downloading a movie might take just a minute or two but it still takes 2 hours to watch a 2 hour movie on your phone or tablet or laptop and you use up the same amount of your data plan no matter how fast or slow you go. As far as mobile goes this sounds like a solution in search of a problem no matter what the neckbeards say.
    Use in car-to-car communications for autonomy and improved safety?
    lolliver
  • Reply 20 of 38
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,396member
    ksec said:

    Right now I really wish Apple improves their Antenna design in iPhone. Because it is severely lacking behind its competitors, namely Samsung.

    Says who? You? Because some website said so? Just because? Samsung says so? Blathering idiocy presented as fact is what your claim is.
    lolliver
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