Sonos One feet leaving same white marks on wood furniture that the HomePod can

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 58
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
  • Reply 42 of 58
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator

    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    You mean silicone, right?
    Yeah. I've been fighting auto-correct on that all week.
    fastasleepwatto_cobraronn
  • Reply 43 of 58
    <sigh> an article on a tech blog about rings left on furniture surfaces ... how has it come to this, this hyper (and pathological) sensitivity? I dunno is there a possibility, somehow, of a 'cultural appropriation' or pronoun issue here? If someone tries hard enough it's bound to be found. Is everyone happy about referring to this item as 'it'? Perhaps 'zit' would be safer and more neutral?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 58
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,758member
    " ...the unit was causing a stain to appear on some wood surfaces"

    I'd argue white ring is actually now a lack of stain ..  ;)
  • Reply 45 of 58
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    So you’re suggesting Apple knew silicon would leave these rings and there are better options but they chose silicon anyway because it feels better? What about Sonos then? Was that also an aesthetic decision?
    ronn
  • Reply 46 of 58
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,048member
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    A week into HomePods out in the wild, and a google image search still shows no signs of a flood of angrily posted images of rings left behind by HomePods. Why? Because as surely as it is a thing, it’s apparently not that much of a thing. A small subset of people who bought HomePods have furniture with the incompatible finish, and at least some percentage of those people were already aware that they have to be careful what they place on those surfaces, because it’s not just HomePods that pose a hazard. So, very few people have actually experienced and been surprised by the issue.

    This will ultimately be as small an issue as was the momentary furor when Apple Watch first came out and people realized that its heart rate sensors can’t read through dark tattoos. For a few people it was a problem, but not many, and ultimately not that surprising, and not that big a deal. If you made the decision to have a dark tattoo on the back of your wrist, don’t put an Apple Watch on that wrist. Likewise, if you’ve made the decision to own a piece of furniture with a sensitive finish, don’t put a HomePod on it. Or, put a coaster or doily under it. It’s not a big deal.

    StrangeDayswatto_cobraronn
  • Reply 47 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    AppleZulu said:
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    A week into HomePods out in the wild, and a google image search still shows no signs of a flood of angrily posted images of rings left behind by HomePods. Why? Because as surely as it is a thing, it’s apparently not that much of a thing. A small subset of people who bought HomePods have furniture with the incompatible finish, and at least some percentage of those people were already aware that they have to be careful what they place on those surfaces, because it’s not just HomePods that pose a hazard. So, very few people have actually experienced and been surprised by the issue.

    This will ultimately be as small an issue as was the momentary furor when Apple Watch first came out and people realized that its heart rate sensors can’t read through dark tattoos. For a few people it was a problem, but not many, and ultimately not that surprising, and not that big a deal. If you made the decision to have a dark tattoo on the back of your wrist, don’t put an Apple Watch on that wrist. Likewise, if you’ve made the decision to own a piece of furniture with a sensitive finish, don’t put a HomePod on it. Or, put a coaster or doily under it. It’s not a big deal.

    False Analogies are, well, false...
  • Reply 48 of 58
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,048member
    AppleZulu said:
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    A week into HomePods out in the wild, and a google image search still shows no signs of a flood of angrily posted images of rings left behind by HomePods. Why? Because as surely as it is a thing, it’s apparently not that much of a thing. A small subset of people who bought HomePods have furniture with the incompatible finish, and at least some percentage of those people were already aware that they have to be careful what they place on those surfaces, because it’s not just HomePods that pose a hazard. So, very few people have actually experienced and been surprised by the issue.

    This will ultimately be as small an issue as was the momentary furor when Apple Watch first came out and people realized that its heart rate sensors can’t read through dark tattoos. For a few people it was a problem, but not many, and ultimately not that surprising, and not that big a deal. If you made the decision to have a dark tattoo on the back of your wrist, don’t put an Apple Watch on that wrist. Likewise, if you’ve made the decision to own a piece of furniture with a sensitive finish, don’t put a HomePod on it. Or, put a coaster or doily under it. It’s not a big deal.

    False Analogies are, well, false...
    That’s a truly fancy way to say “nuh uh!”
    StrangeDaysronn
  • Reply 49 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    So you’re suggesting Apple knew silicon would leave these rings and there are better options but they chose silicon anyway because it feels better? What about Sonos then? Was that also an aesthetic decision?
    No, I'm not suggesting that silicon leaves these rings and that better options were available, I'm saying that -- quite directly...
    But I neither said nor suggested that Apple knew that at the time. 

    And, Does it really matter how many organizations chose it?
    A bad choice is a bad choice -- especially if other, time proven options that work as well -- but don't create problems -- are readily available.


  • Reply 50 of 58
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    So you’re suggesting Apple knew silicon would leave these rings and there are better options but they chose silicon anyway because it feels better? What about Sonos then? Was that also an aesthetic decision?
    No, I'm not suggesting that silicon leaves these rings and that better options were available, I'm saying that -- quite directly...
    But I neither said nor suggested that Apple knew that at the time. 

    And, Does it really matter how many organizations chose it?
    A bad choice is a bad choice -- especially if other, time proven options that work as well -- but don't create problems -- are readily available.


    Mike W mentioned elsewhere that silicon is a better acoustic dampener than rubber. So it wasn't used arbitrarily, and that doesn't make it a bad choice. It makes it a bad choice to you so you can whine about it.... But I seriously doubt it's been a problem in your life because I doubt you have either a HP or an oiled wood surface to place it on. Send us a photo otherwise.
    Rayz2016watto_cobraronn
  • Reply 51 of 58
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,374member
    This was an interesting revelation in the cause.

    Obviously many things will leave marks on different surfaces. It was also obvious to me that silicone was used because it lives longer than rubber. And on a device that cost 80% of purchase price to repair, long-lived parts are a good thing.

    What I didn't know was that the rings are an absence of oil at the point of contact and that they might fade in time with the HP removed. Most marks like this are actually permanent and need retouching or refinishing to remove them.

    I think a lot of people wouldn't expect the HP to leave marks on wood. I don't know that Apple tested the silicone base on several mediums to check for markings. The wood in their stores is probably sealed. Even if it wasn't, it's probably cleaned on a regular basis so the marks might take a lot longer to show, if at all.

    That '1000%' attention is probably 900% Apple haters wanting to make something out of nothing, and some YUUUUGE mountain out of a molehill.


    watto_cobraronn
  • Reply 52 of 58
    dsddsd Posts: 186member
    It looks fine at my place.


  • Reply 53 of 58
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    So you’re suggesting Apple knew silicon would leave these rings and there are better options but they chose silicon anyway because it feels better? What about Sonos then? Was that also an aesthetic decision?
    No, I'm not suggesting that silicon leaves these rings and that better options were available, I'm saying that -- quite directly...
    But I neither said nor suggested that Apple knew that at the time. 

    And, Does it really matter how many organizations chose it?
    A bad choice is a bad choice -- especially if other, time proven options that work as well -- but don't create problems -- are readily available.


    Mike W mentioned elsewhere that silicon is a better acoustic dampener than rubber. So it wasn't used arbitrarily, and that doesn't make it a bad choice. It makes it a bad choice to you so you can whine about it.... But I seriously doubt it's been a problem in your life because I doubt you have either a HP or an oiled wood surface to place it on. Send us a photo otherwise.
    LOL...  Sorry, but a product that is designed to sit on a piece of furniture but then damages it is poorly designed.   You can try to justify it or even call it whining if it makes you feel better, but that doesn't change the fact the product was poorly designed.

    Even Steve understood that Apple ain't perfect all the time, everytime.
  • Reply 54 of 58
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,100member
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    So you’re suggesting Apple knew silicon would leave these rings and there are better options but they chose silicon anyway because it feels better? What about Sonos then? Was that also an aesthetic decision?
    No, I'm not suggesting that silicon leaves these rings and that better options were available, I'm saying that -- quite directly...
    But I neither said nor suggested that Apple knew that at the time. 

    And, Does it really matter how many organizations chose it?
    A bad choice is a bad choice -- especially if other, time proven options that work as well -- but don't create problems -- are readily available.


    Mike W mentioned elsewhere that silicon is a better acoustic dampener than rubber. So it wasn't used arbitrarily, and that doesn't make it a bad choice. It makes it a bad choice to you so you can whine about it.... But I seriously doubt it's been a problem in your life because I doubt you have either a HP or an oiled wood surface to place it on. Send us a photo otherwise.
    LOL...  Sorry, but a product that is designed to sit on a piece of furniture but then damages it is poorly designed.   You can try to justify it or even call it whining if it makes you feel better, but that doesn't change the fact the product was poorly designed.

    Even Steve understood that Apple ain't perfect all the time, everytime.
    Wrong.  Us calling you a whiner is not to make us feel better, but to simply inform you that the action you are doing is exactly that... whining.

    so... as it has been stated before.  Quit whining, clean your house in a periodic manner and move on.  What next?  Whine that Apple forces you to clean your house?
    watto_cobraronn
  • Reply 55 of 58
    sflocal said:
    AppleZulu said:
    jbdragon said:
    This is just silly. I'd be pissed with white rings on my tables from a speaker. So now I have to think about what kind of table I place my speaker on? Now pointing out that the SONOS 1 does it also. This is bring back Steve Jobs coming out and showing how holding other phones just right blocks the antenna also as the iPhone 4. Do wee really need to go back to that kind of thing?

    The simple fact is, Apple didn't have to use Silicon. If that was rubber on the bottom, it wouldn't matter what table you placed it on, it would be fine. There would be no markings. This is really just another design flaw. Tell it as it is. These excuses are weak. Now we have #ringgate!!

    This is a issue that didn't have to exist. To me, it's more poor testing from Apple. I don't know if it's just so afraid of leaks that outside testing is really locked down?!?! Doing everything in the LAB is not REAL WORLD. This looks like it's going to be another Class Action on Apple. It just didn't have to be this way. Stop with the lame excuses on this.
    Silicon is a more permanent material for dampening than rubber is, is more durable, and deals with getting moved and temperature extremes better.

    Source: was sound isolation assistant on a U.S. Navy submarine.
    Bingo.

    For the uninitiated, please examine the condition of that rubber band you put around that thing a couple of years ago. You know. That thing in the junk drawer. Right. That thing with the cracked and crumbly rubber band stuck to it. That’s the one.
    The rubber feet on my 20 year old Yamaha amp are just fine - same with a Sony amp of similar vintage that a friend gave me.  Like new actually. 

    Do you think a Homepod will have a 20 year life -- or a 2 year?  So, I doubt that longevity was a major concern.  But, silicon does feel better than the hard rubber.   Was this just another design decision where cosmetic factors overrode functional ones?
    So you’re suggesting Apple knew silicon would leave these rings and there are better options but they chose silicon anyway because it feels better? What about Sonos then? Was that also an aesthetic decision?
    No, I'm not suggesting that silicon leaves these rings and that better options were available, I'm saying that -- quite directly...
    But I neither said nor suggested that Apple knew that at the time. 

    And, Does it really matter how many organizations chose it?
    A bad choice is a bad choice -- especially if other, time proven options that work as well -- but don't create problems -- are readily available.


    Mike W mentioned elsewhere that silicon is a better acoustic dampener than rubber. So it wasn't used arbitrarily, and that doesn't make it a bad choice. It makes it a bad choice to you so you can whine about it.... But I seriously doubt it's been a problem in your life because I doubt you have either a HP or an oiled wood surface to place it on. Send us a photo otherwise.
    LOL...  Sorry, but a product that is designed to sit on a piece of furniture but then damages it is poorly designed.   You can try to justify it or even call it whining if it makes you feel better, but that doesn't change the fact the product was poorly designed.

    Even Steve understood that Apple ain't perfect all the time, everytime.
    Wrong.  Us calling you a whiner is not to make us feel better, but to simply inform you that the action you are doing is exactly that... whining.

    so... as it has been stated before.  Quit whining, clean your house in a periodic manner and move on.  What next?  Whine that Apple forces you to clean your house?
    To that nonsense, I can only repeat:
    "LOL...  Sorry, but a product that is designed to sit on a piece of furniture but then damages it is poorly designed.   You can try to justify it or even call it whining if it makes you feel better, but that doesn't change the fact the product was poorly designed.

    Even Steve understood that Apple ain't perfect all the time, everytime."

    Or, to put it another way:   Would you be muttering that nonsense if this were a Samsung product?   Obviously not.   Your rationale is simply to disparage any and all criticism of Apple.   That's not only stupid, it legitimizes the complaints of the Droidees when they say the Apple cult is blind and stupid.  
  • Reply 56 of 58
    A new industry will arise: HomePod mats, HomePod stands, HomePod shelving for bathrooms, HomePod hangers (from the ceiling), HomePod platforms with wireless chargers for your Apple Watch and iPhone 8/8+/X, HomePod tripods for public speaking using your iPhone as microphone, HomePod housing (to protect it from weather and rain), HomePod mounts with power converters for your car and private airplane, HomePod covers with specifiable Pantone colors to match decor, HomePod waterproof covers for the swimming pool, HomePods TV stands, HomePod coffee tables with hole for the power wire, cat proof HomePod cage, etc., etc.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 57 of 58
    jbdragon said:

    How about STOP MAKING EXCUSES FOR APPLE!!!!

    Yes all caps and a quadruple exclamation will definitely make them do what you command .
    ronn
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