How to see which applications on your Mac are 32-bit and won't be supported in the future

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 50
    longpath said:
    Really appalled to see so much of Adobe's most recent Creative Suite with a No.... Just as shocked to see Maxon in the same camp....
    I just checked, and all my CC apps are 64 bit.
  • Reply 42 of 50
    Thank goodness, Stickies is 64bit.

    That said, I've got a huge pile of 32bit apps, some of which I fear won't be updated (classic games, even recent ones). Aside from those, I'm actually looking at bit forward to a big purge of junk. Might even start fresh with my next Mac and not do migration assistant at all, which sounds like a horrible process, but would get rid of 15 years of cruft buildup.
    I can’t live without the MacOS Stickies! 
    I just checked on my MacOS 10.13.4, and Stickies 10.1 is 64 bit.
  • Reply 43 of 50
    asciiascii Posts: 5,816member
    If anyone wants to test 64-bit only mode early, you can do it with the Terminal as of 10.13.4:
    sudo nvram boot-args="-no32exec"

    and then allow 32-bit again with:
    sudo nvram boot-args=""

  • Reply 44 of 50
    My consulting work, for good or bad, has been depending on Microsoft Office 2011, since I mostly have to share files with a company that without exception uses only locked-up Dell notebooks. I see that Office 2011 is 32-bit, and that's going to be a problem. i am not interested in MS's 365 or any of their other options, so I guess my mid-2012 Macbook Air with Office 2011 will not be updated. The Air is pretty old and I don't think updating to a newer OSX would improve anything anyway.
  • Reply 45 of 50
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 410member
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    I had similar concerns because I have older versions of Photoshop and Illustrator that are 32-bit. 
    My solution was to create a small partition to install Sierra, plus whatever legacy apps onto. Since you can partition on the fly now it was painless and I didn’t loose any data. 
    Then I updated the main partition to High Sierra and haven’t had any problems since. 
  • Reply 46 of 50
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 1,728member
    My consulting work, for good or bad, has been depending on Microsoft Office 2011, since I mostly have to share files with a company that without exception uses only locked-up Dell notebooks. I see that Office 2011 is 32-bit, and that's going to be a problem. i am not interested in MS's 365 or any of their other options, so I guess my mid-2012 Macbook Air with Office 2011 will not be updated. The Air is pretty old and I don't think updating to a newer OSX would improve anything anyway.
    Why would you not just buy Office 2016?
  • Reply 47 of 50
    jdiamondjdiamond Posts: 38member
    Just noticed that as of Sierra, Apple's own DVD Player App is 32-bit.  I still use this all the time to watch movies using an external DVD drive, since MacOS Bluray players are not the greatest quality.  I sure hope Apple will provide a 64-bit version.  

    I can't believe how much we have to suffer because a single model of Mac once had a 32-bit Intel CPU in it.  :(   I'm losing a lot of dear programs that I'll try to recreate in an emulator as best as I can.  There's really no need for this at all - it's almost zero effort to create a special emulation platform similar to Rosetta for PowerPC.
  • Reply 48 of 50
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,144member
    jdiamond said:
    Just noticed that as of Sierra, Apple's own DVD Player App is 32-bit.  I still use this all the time to watch movies using an external DVD drive, since MacOS Bluray players are not the greatest quality.  I sure hope Apple will provide a 64-bit version.  

    I can't believe how much we have to suffer because a single model of Mac once had a 32-bit Intel CPU in it.  :(   I'm losing a lot of dear programs that I'll try to recreate in an emulator as best as I can.  There's really no need for this at all - it's almost zero effort to create a special emulation platform similar to Rosetta for PowerPC.
    Either Apple is going to update the DVD Player app when they release the 64-bit only OS (as it’s certainly not a priority for their business model), or they’re actually planning to discontinue it, since it’s clear they will never support Blu-ray and prefer customers stream their media. I personally switched to VLC a long time ago, because I tend to send my media to my TV via AirPlay, and Apples DVD Player will not allow the picture to be streamed via AirPlay. So you might start thinking about that, for many reasons, but especially if they drop the app altogether.
    edited June 2
  • Reply 49 of 50
    Not sure if this is a stupid question... but could I potentially create a Parallels VM using an older version of macOS to run 32bit apps, while the parent macOS version no longer allows them? That seems like it would be a relatively painless way to be able to access really old/classic stuff occasionally, maybe not for high productivity apps. Thinking more like it'd be fun to boot up old games and such once in a while.
    Yes, I’ve been doing this for a while now with Parallels running 10.6 so I can run classic os 9 programs
  • Reply 50 of 50
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Yes, I’ve been doing this for a while now with Parallels running 10.6 so I can run classic os 9 programs
    Parallels can do it? That’s good to know. I’ve been using SheepShaver, though I’m now noticing that High Sierra balks at running it...

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