How to see which applications on your Mac are 32-bit and won't be supported in the future

Posted:
in macOS edited April 12
Apple has confirmed that macOS will no longer provide full support for 32-bit apps following High Sierra, and users are starting to see warnings about it. AppleInsider shows you how to check which software on your Mac might be affected by the shift.




Since the initial High Sierra 10.13.4 beta release, users have been warned that the operating system won't maintain full compatibility for 32-bit apps for much longer. There's a way to see the complete list of apps installed on your system that will require updates.

First, click the Apple logo in the top left corner of your screen and select About this Mac.




Click System Report.




Scroll down on the left-hand panel to find the Software section, and select Applications.




You'll find the affected apps in the far-right column, under the heading 64-Bit (Intel). Applications labeled with "No" are 32-bit only.




Apple hasn't outright stated when compatibility with 32-bit apps will be dropped entirely. However, they might suffer from performance issues on the next version of macOS, as they'll no longer run "without compromise."

At present, there are a fair amount of Apple applications and processes that are 32-bit -- those aren't the ones to worry about. Third party software may be problematic, though.

For those apps, the impending shift might mean that the time has come to ask the developer what the plans are, or to start looking at alternative options.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 50
    *cough* Steam *cough*
    racerhomie3
  • Reply 2 of 50
    Flash?  Seriously Flash?

    Get that security nightmare off your computer! 
    racerhomie3chiatallest skilrevenantevilutionjbdragonlkrupposmartormenajr
  • Reply 3 of 50
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,602member
    Thanks! Very helpful article.
    baconstang
  • Reply 4 of 50
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    ravnorodom
  • Reply 5 of 50
    There's more than just front-facing apps. There's also background processes.

    Dropbox is the last remaining holdout on my computer with their 32-bit filesystem events monitoring process.

    ... as seen in Activity Viewer.


    racerhomie3Rayz2016longpath
  • Reply 6 of 50
    I hope project Marzipan ,helps to bring more & more Mac apps into the 64bit age.
  • Reply 7 of 50
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,285member
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    Live in the past forever, stuck in time for all eternity.
    edited February 27 chiajbdragonStrangeDayschristopher126
  • Reply 8 of 50
    chiachia Posts: 681member
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    Time is a train 
    Makes the future the past 
    Leaves you standing in the station 
    Your face pressed up against the glass

    and High Sierra’s the ticket you need to ride today.


  • Reply 9 of 50
    I doesn't seem to differentiate between Mac and iOS apps. I have some old iOS projects on my disk and it showed all of the .app packages as 32-bit (which they probably are) but those aren't Mac OS .app packages.
  • Reply 10 of 50
    lkrupp said:
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    Live in the past forever, stuck in time for all eternity.
    Let's say you have a 32-bit app on your computer as opposed to 64-bit.

    So what? Is it really that big of a deal? It seems this Kool-Aid is rather strong. If it's that big of a problem we should be able to run it extra sandboxed. Or something.

    Apple is really not making people happy in the enterprise and education spaces with these decisions. We can't buy new hardware/apps every couple years just because Apple wants us to feed their business model. Meanwhile Windows 7 is chugging along quite happily with end of support a couple years away. I *like* being able to download or install an app I have paid money for, and have it actually work.
    baconstang
  • Reply 11 of 50
    Uh oh, guys. DVD Player is a 32-bit app. I have a sneaking suspicion that Apple might be discontinuing it soon. Whatever will we do!
    welshdogSpamSandwich
  • Reply 12 of 50
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,218administrator
    lkrupp said:
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    Live in the past forever, stuck in time for all eternity.
    Let's say you have a 32-bit app on your computer as opposed to 64-bit.

    So what? Is it really that big of a deal? It seems this Kool-Aid is rather strong. If it's that big of a problem we should be able to run it extra sandboxed. Or something.

    Apple is really not making people happy in the enterprise and education spaces with these decisions. We can't buy new hardware/apps every couple years just because Apple wants us to feed their business model. Meanwhile Windows 7 is chugging along quite happily with end of support a couple years away. I *like* being able to download or install an app I have paid money for, and have it actually work.
    What's the excuse for it? Developers have been able to compile applications as 64-bit for eight years.
    _rick_v_welshdogfastasleepchiajbdragonGG1StrangeDayslongpath
  • Reply 13 of 50
    Maybe the transition to Apple’s ARM processors are easier if everything is 64bit...
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/17/12/20/apples-project-marzipan-will-let-ios-apps-run-on-the-mac-in-2018---report
    evilution
  • Reply 14 of 50
    lkrupp said:
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    Live in the past forever, stuck in time for all eternity.
    Let's say you have a 32-bit app on your computer as opposed to 64-bit.

    So what? Is it really that big of a deal? It seems this Kool-Aid is rather strong. If it's that big of a problem we should be able to run it extra sandboxed. Or something.

    Apple is really not making people happy in the enterprise and education spaces with these decisions. We can't buy new hardware/apps every couple years just because Apple wants us to feed their business model. Meanwhile Windows 7 is chugging along quite happily with end of support a couple years away. I *like* being able to download or install an app I have paid money for, and have it actually work.

    What the heck?!  Apple and their operating system is moving forward.  Microsoft is also pushing Windows forward.  Neither are putting a gun to your head to "buy new hardware/apps every couple years".  If you have some 8-plus year old app that's not being updated; by all means stay with Sierra, or Snow Leopard, or whatever.  But it's silly to expect Apple or Microsoft to support legacy software forever also.

    As for "Windows 7 support"-- by 'support', you're getting critical bug (i.e. exploit) fixes only.  Not new features.  New features stop the second a newer operating system is released.  If you're looking for a OS with a 10 year support cycle, by all means switch to Windows!
  • Reply 15 of 50
    chasmchasm Posts: 756member
    Haven’t and won’t upgrade to High Sierra. Not gonna happen.
    Actually, of course, you will in time. Eventually you'll be replacing your computer with another one, and you won't be able to stay where you are. But even before that, you appear to be unaware that High Sierra runs 32-bit apps perfectly fine ... there's a possibility that this year's update (which doesn't yet have a name) coming in the fall won't, but that's not confirmed.

    So for the same of security if for no other reason, you should upgrade to High Sierra.

    When the day comes that my old Photoshop CS3 will no longer run on my machine, I'll be a little sad, but -- you know, come on -- I will have gotten (as of this March) a full decade out of a single piece of software. Yes, Photoshop CS3 and later runs on High Sierra, but I certainly got my money's worth out of it, and the current CC is vastly superior on every level (and costs me a great deal less per year than the previous normal 2-3 year upgrade cycle did).

    Bottom line: paradigm shifts like 32-bit to 64-bit don't happen every day, and this one has been handled exceptionally smoothly by Apple IMO, so lose the butthurt.
    dbbcSpamSandwichchiaStrangeDaysroundaboutnow
  • Reply 16 of 50
    The main culprits on my systems are (cue drum roll)

    Adobe
    Drobo

    Now there's a surprise (not)


    SpamSandwichjbdragon
  • Reply 17 of 50
    Thankfully 64-bit for everything.
  • Reply 18 of 50
    ednlednl Posts: 15member
    I thought you guys had this article before?

    My 32-bit apps of note: MPEG Streamclip, QuickTime Player 7, TextWrangler, VideoSpec, XLD.
  • Reply 19 of 50
    chasmchasm Posts: 756member
    While the tip here is useful, it’s also wildly premature. As demonstrated by the posts above, there’s a fair few apps that are still 32-bit at present, but does anyone here seriously believe Steam, Dropbox, et al won’t get updated to 64-bit before that unannounced and likely months off (at least) day arrives?

    At present, this tip is really only useful to take a look at your apps for spring cleaning. App hasn’t been updated in four years and you almost never or never use it? Chuck it. App hasn’t been updated in ages but you do still use it often? Shoot a message to the Dev asking about 64-bit compatibility. Otherwise, don’t worry about it — 99 percent or more of the apps you use every day that are currently supported will be ... shock! ... supported when 64-bit is king.

    That said, if your workflow depends on 10-year-old apps like Photoshop CS3 because you’re a cheapass ... don’t pretend you didn’t know this day was coming, don’t pretend you’re shocked that app won’t be updated, and don’t pretend you’re not the one at fault for your forthcoming predicament.
    edited February 28 jbdragonroundaboutnow
  • Reply 20 of 50
    Thank goodness, Stickies is 64bit.

    That said, I've got a huge pile of 32bit apps, some of which I fear won't be updated (classic games, even recent ones). Aside from those, I'm actually looking at bit forward to a big purge of junk. Might even start fresh with my next Mac and not do migration assistant at all, which sounds like a horrible process, but would get rid of 15 years of cruft buildup.
    chasmsuddenly newton
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