User satisfaction, refurbished device prevalence may hurt future iPhone sales

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  • Reply 41 of 46
    frantisekfrantisek Posts: 476member
    There is nothing strange on that. That all new madness can not last forever when phone you have do all you need. With Apple quality phones last long. And now when big screen iphone 6 can be bought cheep there is no big reason to rush for anything newer till iOS will support it. Apple know that and pushing into new fields like watch an AR so it can drive sales when even iphone become comodity. I personaly use Apple HW 25 years and never bought anything new.
  • Reply 42 of 46
    thedbathedba Posts: 476member
    NY1822 said:
    just wait for that 5G Super Cycle
    Many of us are still waiting for real 4G  to kick in, the one before the carriers started watering down with their marketing talk. 
    When LTE and WiMax were just about to come to market, I remember hearing promised speeds of 100Mbit/sec. 
    To my knowledge this still isn't the case.  Not even close. 
    tmay
  • Reply 43 of 46
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,705member
    Personally, I think the 2017/2018 sales period provided a perfect opportunity for 2nd gen hardware (whether new or refurbished) because the iPhone is in a transition period:

    From a functional standpoint, there are not a lot of significant differences between a 6S and and X.   For the most part the 6S can do everything the X can do -- just, generally, not quite as well...   Yes, Apple has made enormous strides in hardware power and speed.  But that new power has yet to be fully utilized.

    But, coming up we have things that will demand that high level of power to deliver new abilities to phone: 
    - AI
    - Augmented Reality
    - 5G and related applications

    So basically, I think this cycle is a prime time to save a few bucks by purchasing a 2nd gen or refurbished phone.   And, save that money for a another year or two when these new functions hit the iPhone and it all matures together.   THEN use your money to invest in the latest and the greatest -- because it will enable you to do things never before possible.
  • Reply 44 of 46
    ivanhivanh Posts: 361member
    You open an Apple iPhone app, full of known but ignored or even new bugs. Will you care if you're using an iPhone 6 Plus or iPhone X?  The speed of any user interface such as opening an app, on an iPhone X always reminds you the first year of owning your iPhone 6 Plus, will you feel excited or betrayed? Even worse, you'd and should be worrying in just 2 years, the iPhone X will be as slow as your iPhone 6 Plus and tapping but receiving a response only after 10 seconds on the touchscreen, the same experience when you upgraded your iPhone 4s to an iPhone 6 Plus.  You're still tolerating the same old bugs and lack of refinement on your original Apple apps like Contacts, Reminders, Calendar, Apple Maps, iBooks (its name might have changed), iTunes, FaceTime, etc and etc...While the new iOS will always stamp with a new number, the versions of the apps are still 5 or 7 years old. What's the point to buy a new iPhone today and cry again in 2 years?  How can you be guaranteed that you can take a picture within 10 seconds on your iPhone X in 2 years?  My iPhone 6 Plus takes 12 seconds now, just to take a picture!
  • Reply 45 of 46
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,636administrator
    ivanh said:
    You open an Apple iPhone app, full of known but ignored or even new bugs. Will you care if you're using an iPhone 6 Plus or iPhone X?  The speed of any user interface such as opening an app, on an iPhone X always reminds you the first year of owning your iPhone 6 Plus, will you feel excited or betrayed? Even worse, you'd and should be worrying in just 2 years, the iPhone X will be as slow as your iPhone 6 Plus and tapping but receiving a response only after 10 seconds on the touchscreen, the same experience when you upgraded your iPhone 4s to an iPhone 6 Plus.  You're still tolerating the same old bugs and lack of refinement on your original Apple apps like Contacts, Reminders, Calendar, Apple Maps, iBooks (its name might have changed), iTunes, FaceTime, etc and etc...While the new iOS will always stamp with a new number, the versions of the apps are still 5 or 7 years old. What's the point to buy a new iPhone today and cry again in 2 years?  How can you be guaranteed that you can take a picture within 10 seconds on your iPhone X in 2 years?  My iPhone 6 Plus takes 12 seconds now, just to take a picture!
    Oh good, this again.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 46 of 46
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,528member
    airnerd said:
    brucemc said:
    airnerd said:
    this only makes sense.  As the phones become more reliable and the advances between iterations gets less, there is less reason to get a new one.  Nothing wrong with the old one.  Up until now there were huge changes for almost every non "S" version of the iPhone.  From better antennas to better screen, better camera, better security via touch ID, better durability due to fewer moving parts, etc.  Screen resolution can't get THAT much better, durability is high, 5G is around the corner but other than that the networking capabilities aren't leaps and bounds better.  There just hasn't been that next round of "wow, I can't do day to day tasks without that".  AR is cool but in its infancy.  FaceID is cool, but a gimmick at this point.  I'm not knocking the X, it's cool but there is no incentive to move up.  That's why I'm still on my 6, it is still too good of a phone to toss.  

    Maybe Apple should embrace the tinfoil hat-wearers and put in some planned obsolescence  :fearful: 
    I agree with most of your post, but the FaceID as gimmick comment seems odd.  From what I have read, and in speaking to X owners, it works quite well, and they find it better than TouchID overall.  It does exactly what it is supposed to do, well, and reliably.  Not sure how that makes it a gimmick.
    Sorry, I didn't mean to imply it doesn't work well.  I meant gimmick in that my finger print unlocked it just as well and just as fast IMO.  Essentially I had no issues with speed of unlocking my phone before, so this doesn't offer any sizeable advantage over what we had before.   As the technology grows and that camera that can map faces now is used for more things like perhaps more accurate 3D scanning, then it will become a useful function.
    A difference in our use of terminology.  A gimmick to me is something which doesn't have a real use - perhaps it is used to show off a new tech trick, or tick a box of specs.  Actually, the Samsung "face recognition" feature, which actually wasn't secure in that it could be easily spoofed by a picture, and which Samsung then clarified as not being a security mechanism, is what I would label a "gimmick".

    FaceID provides a biometric means to securely unlock the phone, use Apple Pay, etc.  It has a few benefits above TouchID, and a few constraints as well.  It does what it is advertised to, and does it well.  It is useful to millions in the real world.

    I suppose you could qualify Animoji as a bit of a gimmick, although I know some people that love it.
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