Wacom refreshes Intuos pen tablet line with smaller models and built-in Bluetooth connecti...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2018
Wacom has refreshed its Intuos pen tablet range with new upgraded models, with the new small and medium-sized tablets boasting a smaller footprint and lighter weight than previous models, while also touting optional Bluetooth integration making some variants work wirelessly when used with a Mac.

Wacom Intuos new pen tablets


The new Wacom Intuos pen tablets are entry-level offerings compared to the company's Intuos Pro and Cintiq models, intended for beginners starting to get to grips with the tool. Both the small and medium sizes offer an improved 4,096 levels of pressure sensitivity when used with the included battery-free stylus, the Wacom Pen 4K, with a 7 millimeter reading height and a 0.25 millimeter digital tolerance in accuracy.

The Pen 4K is said to have an improved ergonomic design with an increased weight and a soft-touch grip. Replacement nibs are included in a compartment within the stylus, which also holds a nib extractor.

The models are smaller than earlier versions, but Wacom says they offer the same active tablet areas as their predecessors, measuring 6 by 3.7 inches and 8.5 by 5.3 inches for the small and medium sizes respectively. Across the top is the pen tray for storing the stylus, which also incorporates four express keys to quickly select functions or shortcuts in applications.

Wacom Intuos Bluetooth tablets with pen


In this version, some models are being offered with Bluetooth connectivity built-in, instead of requiring a separate wireless kit. The Bluetooth models are claimed to offer a 60 percent battery life improvement compared to earlier systems, while still also to be connected to a Mac using a USB cable.

All versions are provided with optional downloads for related applications, including Corel Painter Essentials 6, Corel AfterShot 3, and in the case of the Bluetooth models, Celsys Clip Studio Paint Pro. While the small model offers one or two downloads out of the available selection, depending on whether it is equipped with Bluetooth, users of the medium-sized tablet will be able to download all three.

Where to buy

The Wacom Intuos Small costs $99 for the Bluetooth-equipped model and $79 without, while the Intuos Medium is offered with Bluetooth for $199 at Adorama, Amazon and B&H. All versions are available in charcoal black, but the Bluetooth versions have options for pistachio green and berry pink casings, depending on the region. When shopping at Adorama, sales tax will not be collected on orders shipped outside New York and New Jersey. B&H also will not collect sales tax outside New York and New Jersey; however, sales are reported in Colorado and Vermont (see here).

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,837member
    They still make the best pens, IMO. And the “tooth” on their drawing surfaces are much better than glass, which is too slippery. Could be an interesting company for Apple to acquire to beef up their pro and prosumer offerings for artists, designers, architects, etc.
    edited March 2018 cornchip
  • Reply 2 of 10
    seankillseankill Posts: 456member
    They still make the best pens, IMO. And the “tooth” on their drawing surfaces are much better than glass, which is too slippery. Could be an interesting company for Apple to acquire to beef up their pro and prosumer offerings for artists, designers, architects, etc.
    I can see the points about the glass. I’m not an artist and don’t draw but I am curious, how does one draw on a black pad to an image on another screen? Seems like a difficult concept to me. 
  • Reply 3 of 10
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,837member
    seankill said:
    They still make the best pens, IMO. And the “tooth” on their drawing surfaces are much better than glass, which is too slippery. Could be an interesting company for Apple to acquire to beef up their pro and prosumer offerings for artists, designers, architects, etc.
    I can see the points about the glass. I’m not an artist and don’t draw but I am curious, how does one draw on a black pad to an image on another screen? Seems like a difficult concept to me. 
    After decades of doing it, the process is not a problem because the feedback is so good. Plus, hovering the pen above the surface indicates the current location of the chosen tool on the canvas/screen.

    If you can navigate your computer using a mouse or a trackpad, you can do the same with a Wacom tablet.
    edited March 2018 cornchip
  • Reply 4 of 10
    Do the new models fully support all the gestures? The older ones could be used like a mouse but not all the gestures.

    I am not a fan of the Blizzard White Apple Trackpad. Still using the original Apple trackpad, but it will eventually need replacing.
    Currently the only way to get a Black Apple Trackpad is to buy the Black iMac or drop $200 for a ColorWare model.
  • Reply 5 of 10
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 239member
    I tried the Wacom Pro tablet with BT and though is a very good quality product I found it very limited unless your focus is Photoshop, some illustration apps and maybe Zbrush. I ended up returning it and getting an iPad Pro with the pencil, way better investment. With apps like Procreate, AstroPad, Affinity and other is much more powerful and versatile too compare to a Wacom. Obviously the iPad is a higher price, but you get so much more functionality.
  • Reply 6 of 10
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,837member
    gutengel said:
    I tried the Wacom Pro tablet with BT and though is a very good quality product I found it very limited unless your focus is Photoshop, some illustration apps and maybe Zbrush. I ended up returning it and getting an iPad Pro with the pencil, way better investment. With apps like Procreate, AstroPad, Affinity and other is much more powerful and versatile too compare to a Wacom. Obviously the iPad is a higher price, but you get so much more functionality.
    Depends on your personal use case. I've found pluses and minuses with each.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,244member
    I had an old Wacom intuos|| 9x12 which was pretty great for a long time. Around the time they stopped making OS X drivers for it my brother gave me his ipad3 and I got the Wacom stylus. Never looked back. When I got my new job a couple years ago one of the guys had some Wacom product. I forget which one it was but it seemed like it was supposed to be pretty nice and it was a decent size. I thought it might be better than pudging along with the iPad 3. Well I don’t know if there was some settings off or what, but that thing was HORRIBLE. I tried to figure out why it was skittish, wobbly & seemed to have bizarrely irrational sensitivity. But I just toughed it out with the 3 & then a 4 until I could get the Pro (what I’m typing on now). 

    Awesome.

    like another commenter or two I do wish there was a bit more tooth to with the  Pencil. I have a screen protector, but that’s still not as good as the old Wacom action. I saw there was a kickstarter that promised supposedly toothier sketching action, but I forgot to contribute and haven’t bothered to look into it yet. I have half a mind to start my own kickstarter to sell grippier tips for  Pencil! 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 8 of 10
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,016member
    Ohhh.... I thought the lid came off the pen to give it a brush like feel as alternative mode. No just spare nibs. 
  • Reply 9 of 10
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,541member
    seankill said:
    They still make the best pens, IMO. And the “tooth” on their drawing surfaces are much better than glass, which is too slippery. Could be an interesting company for Apple to acquire to beef up their pro and prosumer offerings for artists, designers, architects, etc.
    I can see the points about the glass. I’m not an artist and don’t draw but I am curious, how does one draw on a black pad to an image on another screen? Seems like a difficult concept to me. 
    Ask yourself the same question about using a mouse. Protip: you don't look at the pad.
    edited March 2018 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 10 of 10
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,541member

    mattinoz said:
    Ohhh.... I thought the lid came off the pen to give it a brush like feel as alternative mode. No just spare nibs. 
    The different nibs have different feels to them; some are rougher or smoother or more or less flexible.
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