Apple CEO Tim Cook, Apple Music, App Stores commemorate International Women's Day celebrat...

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Apple CEO Tim Cook quoted Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai on Twitter, as one of a number of ways Apple is commemorating International Women's Day on March 8, celebrating the achievements of women and commemorating the movement for women's rights.




In the tweet, Cook thanks all the inspiring women he works with at Apple, as well as "every woman who fights for equality." Cook elected to include a quote from Malala Yousafzai, a well-known campaigner aiming to increase the access of education for girls in developing regions.

The quote reads: "There are two powers in the world; one is the sword and the other is the pen. There is a third power stronger than both, that of women."

In January, Apple revealed it pledged support to the Malala Fund, which is expected to help double the number of grants provided by the fund's Gulmakai Network, which supports education programs in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Nigeria. Apple is also helping the organization scale up by assisting with technology, creating a curriculum, and research into policy changes to help girls attend school and complete their education.

Cook has previously called Malala a "courageous advocate for equality and one of the most inspiring figures of our time."

"There are two powers in the world; one is the sword and the other is the pen. There is a third power stronger than both, that of women." -- Malala
Thank you to all of the inspiring women I work with at Apple, and to every woman who fights for equality. #InternationalWomensDay

-- Tim Cook (@tim_cook)


The Twitter posting joins the variety of other ways Apple is marking International Women's Day. In the App Store in the U.S., it is highlighting apps and services with a focus on women, including health apps, the women-only social network Present, and a feature on the women directing Netflix's female-led "Jessica Jones," with Apple Music and iTunes Movies promoting content in a similar vein.

Apple Watch users can take part in a special challenge taking place throughout the day. To win the challenge, and receive the "2018" International Women's Day Challenge badge, users need to complete double their normal Move goals before the day ends.




Apple is also holding events in some of its retail outlets in honor of the day, including a recruiting event in its Paris Marche Saint-Germain store, and talks and a coding event at the London Mayfair store held in association with She Can Code and NetMums.

On Wednesday, Apple's annual Supplier Responsibility Report announced a new women's health initiative, starting at supplier facilities in China and India. The initiative includes a curriculum that provides information on self-examination for early cancer detection, nutrition, personal care, and maternal health, with access to services required to maintain proper health also offered.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,116member
    And in a show of woke unity, they all watched the season finale of The Bachelor together.
  • Reply 2 of 17
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,589administrator
    Seriously, one good post before the forum rules got broken?

    Seriously, one post within the forums rules before they got broken?

    Review them, before you feel like crap-posting in my house.
    edited March 8 lolliver
  • Reply 3 of 17
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    Seriously, one good post before the forum rules got broken?

    Review them, before you feel like crap-posting in my house.
    How is generalizing about women only being unified enough to watch The Bachelor a "good post"?
  • Reply 4 of 17
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,589administrator
    auxio said:
    Seriously, one good post before the forum rules got broken?

    Review them, before you feel like crap-posting in my house.
    How is generalizing about women only being unified enough to watch The Bachelor a "good post"?
    Fine. One acceptable post under the rules, to be more precise, then.
  • Reply 5 of 17
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    auxio said:
    Seriously, one good post before the forum rules got broken?

    Review them, before you feel like crap-posting in my house.
    How is generalizing about women only being unified enough to watch The Bachelor a "good post"?
    Fine. One acceptable post under the rules, to be more precise, then.
    Fair enough.  Though it certainly supports the statement I made about societal attitudes towards women (and why International Women's Day is needed).
  • Reply 6 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,116member
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    edited March 8 JonInAtldesignr
  • Reply 7 of 17
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,588member
    I welcome the new era of the empowered women. I welcome the era of women in charge at ever level of society. My god, men have been ruling for long enough and didn't do a very good job of it. I mean, it is hard to imagine things could get worse. Women, and to be more specific, young women (as well as young men), need to take charge. Old dudes have wrecked the place and it needs fixing. There is nothing about the current women's movement that I find threatening. It is time men got their act together and started talking. I think it is great that TC steps out and makes his voice heard.
    SoliStrangeDayslolliver
  • Reply 8 of 17
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 609member
    Groan the usual frightened men responding as expected. Someday International Women's Day may not be needed but until then we must acknowledge the BS women in nearly every country have to put up with in their lives.  
    edited March 8 auxioSoliStrangeDayslolliverjony0
  • Reply 9 of 17
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 337member
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    Every day is Human Being Day. The problem is that even with that, the implicit default has historically always gone to one gender of one ethnicity. So sometimes other genders and/or ethnicities get specifically called out to recognize their contributions to humanity. Everyone who gets bothered by that should try adding the word “too” to whatever the called out group is, e.g., Women’s Day, Too. Nobody is saying they’re more important than anyone else, they’re just taking a moment to think beyond the usual default and recognize that they’re important, too
    spice-boyStrangeDayslolliverjony0
  • Reply 10 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,116member
    AppleZulu said:
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    Every day is Human Being Day. The problem is that even with that, the implicit default has historically always gone to one gender of one ethnicity. So sometimes other genders and/or ethnicities get specifically called out to recognize their contributions to humanity. Everyone who gets bothered by that should try adding the word “too” to whatever the called out group is, e.g., Women’s Day, Too. Nobody is saying they’re more important than anyone else, they’re just taking a moment to think beyond the usual default and recognize that they’re important, too
    Based on the countries cited in the story, I think the real issue is with societies or groups where women are persecuted, suppressed or murdered because of a collective Stone Age-level religious belief. Whatever happens in the US pales in comparison to the cruelty and imbecility of places where dogma is used to control half their population.
    edited March 8
  • Reply 11 of 17
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    AppleZulu said:
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    Every day is Human Being Day. The problem is that even with that, the implicit default has historically always gone to one gender of one ethnicity. So sometimes other genders and/or ethnicities get specifically called out to recognize their contributions to humanity. Everyone who gets bothered by that should try adding the word “too” to whatever the called out group is, e.g., Women’s Day, Too. Nobody is saying they’re more important than anyone else, they’re just taking a moment to think beyond the usual default and recognize that they’re important, too
    It's not just about recognizing the contributions of different groups of humans.  It's also about educating people about the biases against certain groups (in this case women), and the effects of those biases, in the hopes of eliminating them.

    As far as law goes, there have been (and still currently are) laws which limit the rights of women.  For example, women being prohibited from voting.  That particular law has changed in most developed nations now (after much protest), but still exists in some countries.

    Then there are biases in the attitudes of a large portion of the population which create barriers and limitations for those groups.  For example, workplace attitudes that women are only good for certain jobs, or the attitude above that all women care about is watching The Bachelor.  Often people who aren't part of that group don't even see those biases because they don't have to experience the effects of them on a daily basis.  By calling out those biases and trying to educate people about the effects they have, hopefully more people will recognize them and they will be eliminated over time.

    These are a few of the reasons why an International Women's Day is necessary.
    edited March 8 StrangeDayslolliver
  • Reply 12 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,116member
    auxio said:
    AppleZulu said:
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    Every day is Human Being Day. The problem is that even with that, the implicit default has historically always gone to one gender of one ethnicity. So sometimes other genders and/or ethnicities get specifically called out to recognize their contributions to humanity. Everyone who gets bothered by that should try adding the word “too” to whatever the called out group is, e.g., Women’s Day, Too. Nobody is saying they’re more important than anyone else, they’re just taking a moment to think beyond the usual default and recognize that they’re important, too
    It's not just about recognizing the contributions of different groups of humans.  It's also about educating people about the biases against certain groups (in this case women), and the effects of those biases, in the hopes of eliminating them.

    As far as law goes, there have been (and still currently are) laws which limit the rights of women.  For example, women being prohibited from voting.  That has changed in most developed nations now (after much protest), but still exists in some countries.

    Then there are biases in the attitudes of a large portion of the population which create barriers and limitations for those groups.  For example, workplace attitudes that women are only good for certain jobs, or the attitude above that all women care about is watching The Bachelor.  Often people who aren't part of that group don't even see those biases because they don't have to experience the effects of them on a daily basis.  By calling out those biases and trying to educate people about the effects they have, hopefully more people will recognize them and they will be eliminated over time.

    These are a few of the reasons why an International Women's Day is necessary.
    Any alleged problems in the US are insignificant compared to the actual life and death issues some women face outside the US. Celebrating “International Women’s Day” is essentially a passive-aggressive way to avoid addressing the actual problem, which is typically Islamist extremism or Muslim suppression of women. That was the point of the original post. The sarcasm was completely lost in translation (big surprise, welcome to the Internet).
    edited March 8 designr
  • Reply 13 of 17
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,380member
    auxio said:
    AppleZulu said:
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    Every day is Human Being Day. The problem is that even with that, the implicit default has historically always gone to one gender of one ethnicity. So sometimes other genders and/or ethnicities get specifically called out to recognize their contributions to humanity. Everyone who gets bothered by that should try adding the word “too” to whatever the called out group is, e.g., Women’s Day, Too. Nobody is saying they’re more important than anyone else, they’re just taking a moment to think beyond the usual default and recognize that they’re important, too
    It's not just about recognizing the contributions of different groups of humans.  It's also about educating people about the biases against certain groups (in this case women), and the effects of those biases, in the hopes of eliminating them.

    As far as law goes, there have been (and still currently are) laws which limit the rights of women.  For example, women being prohibited from voting.  That has changed in most developed nations now (after much protest), but still exists in some countries.

    Then there are biases in the attitudes of a large portion of the population which create barriers and limitations for those groups.  For example, workplace attitudes that women are only good for certain jobs, or the attitude above that all women care about is watching The Bachelor.  Often people who aren't part of that group don't even see those biases because they don't have to experience the effects of them on a daily basis.  By calling out those biases and trying to educate people about the effects they have, hopefully more people will recognize them and they will be eliminated over time.

    These are a few of the reasons why an International Women's Day is necessary.
    Any alleged problems in the US are insignificant compared to the actual life and death issues some women face outside the US. That was the point of the original post. The sarcasm was completely lost in translation (big surprise, welcome to the Internet).
    Nothing in your comment about The Bachelor referred anything you're now mentioning. While I can't say what you thought or what you intended, I can set that there was nothing lost in translation with what you actually wrote.

    If you're referring to your comment to discount a day that focuses on women because you don't feel that men are focused on enough or that "human beings" are somehow not a consideration among humans beings then I implore you to explain why you believe that an International Women's Day is "gratifying or indulging an immoral or distasteful desire, need, or habit." What exactly do you feel is immoral about it that you'd effectively state All Human Beings Matter?
    edited March 8 lolliver
  • Reply 14 of 17
    holyoneholyone Posts: 377member
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    When is international men's day ? It's only fair no
  • Reply 15 of 17
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    auxio said:
    AppleZulu said:
    Someone please let me know when we’re celebrating Human Being Day, because we’ve already hit peak pandering.

    Hooray for Humans!
    Every day is Human Being Day. The problem is that even with that, the implicit default has historically always gone to one gender of one ethnicity. So sometimes other genders and/or ethnicities get specifically called out to recognize their contributions to humanity. Everyone who gets bothered by that should try adding the word “too” to whatever the called out group is, e.g., Women’s Day, Too. Nobody is saying they’re more important than anyone else, they’re just taking a moment to think beyond the usual default and recognize that they’re important, too
    It's not just about recognizing the contributions of different groups of humans.  It's also about educating people about the biases against certain groups (in this case women), and the effects of those biases, in the hopes of eliminating them.

    As far as law goes, there have been (and still currently are) laws which limit the rights of women.  For example, women being prohibited from voting.  That has changed in most developed nations now (after much protest), but still exists in some countries.

    Then there are biases in the attitudes of a large portion of the population which create barriers and limitations for those groups.  For example, workplace attitudes that women are only good for certain jobs, or the attitude above that all women care about is watching The Bachelor.  Often people who aren't part of that group don't even see those biases because they don't have to experience the effects of them on a daily basis.  By calling out those biases and trying to educate people about the effects they have, hopefully more people will recognize them and they will be eliminated over time.

    These are a few of the reasons why an International Women's Day is necessary.
    Any alleged problems in the US are insignificant compared to the actual life and death issues some women face outside the US. Celebrating “International Women’s Day” is essentially a passive-aggressive way to avoid addressing the actual problem, which is typically Islamist extremism or Muslim suppression of women. That was the point of the original post. The sarcasm was completely lost in translation (big surprise, welcome to the Internet).
    So just because there are areas of the world which have more extreme laws/biases against women, means that we shouldn't also acknowledge and try to educate people about the less extreme ones?  The goal is to eliminate all biases and try to create true equality.  Just because some areas of the world are further behind in that goal doesn't mean we're there yet.

    Maybe talk to some women and ask them about experiences like having some men treat them like "pretty dumb things" in the workplace.  Or, as my wife experienced the other day, having a man follow you around to the point where you need to go into the nearest shop/restaurant and ask someone for help.
    edited March 8 Solispice-boySpamSandwichStrangeDayslolliver
  • Reply 16 of 17
    holyoneholyone Posts: 377member
    spice-boy said:
    Groan the usual frightened men responding as expect. Someday International Women's Day may not be needed but until then we must acknowledge the BS women in nearly every country have to put up with in their lives.  
    And man are having a helluva time yes, I'm curious about the BS you speak of though, care to elaborate
  • Reply 17 of 17
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,589administrator
    When a thread becomes more labor than it is worth to keep moderating, we close it. This one tops most recently -- and for ridiculous reasons.
    lolliver
This discussion has been closed.