Apple Health Records rolls out in iOS 11.3 to praise from doctors in 39 health groups

Posted:
in iPhone edited March 2018
Apple's Health Records has rolled out in iOS 11.3 and is now available for patients in 39 different health groups covering hundreds of thousands of patients across the United States.




The new Health Records feature was previously available to patients who joined the Apple Beta Software Program and used iOS 11.3. With Thursday's update, patients from health institutions who use the feature can view their medical records simply by updating their iOS software on their iPhone.

In what Apple calls the "Northeast and Mid-Atlantic United States" providers AtlantiCare, Geisinger Health System, Johns Hopkins Medicine, LifeBridge Health, NYU Langone Health, Partners HealthCare, Penn Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Inc., Valley Medical Group P.C., plus the combined Yale New Haven Health and Yale Medicine all have compatibility with the feature.

In the midwest, the groups listed by Apple include Cerner Health Clinic, CoxHealth, Mosaic Life Care, Nebraska Methodist Health System, OhioHealth, Rush University Medical Center, Southwest General Health Center, Truman Medical Centers, and The University of Chicago Medicine.

In the south, Adventist Health System, BayCare Health System, Duke University Health System, MedStar Health, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, Mission Health, Ochsner Health System, Ortho Virginia, TSAOG Orthopaedics, UNC Health Care, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and WVU Medicine have enabled the feature.

In the Western U.S., patients of Cedars-Sinai, Dignity Health, Eisenhower Health, Providence St. Joseph Health, Scripps Health, Stanford Medicine, UC San Diego Health, UC Irvine Health have the feature available.

"People hand you all sorts of things these days, and more data is almost never bad, but when they show up with paper, how do you summate that," asked Dr. Robert Harrington from the Department of Medicine at Stanford. "It is a labor intensive, very tedious task."

Harrington said that Apple's Health Records is "an important maneuver for patient empowerment and the way the world needs to be."

This information retrievable from the iPhone or iPad can help patients better understand their health history, have informed conversations with physicians and family members, and make future decisions. Health Records data is encrypted and protected with the user's iPhone passcode.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,317member
    Question for mods regarding the site... I must’ve missed this previously, but I just noticed the little tappable star next to the story headline. What does this do? I noticed there are 3 states for this star symbol: off, outline and filled.
  • Reply 2 of 13
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,773administrator
    Question for mods regarding the site... I must’ve missed this previously, but I just noticed the little tappable star next to the story headline. What does this do? I noticed there are 3 states for this star symbol: off, outline and filled.
    The star, when toggled, bookmarks the thread for you.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,317member
    Question for mods regarding the site... I must’ve missed this previously, but I just noticed the little tappable star next to the story headline. What does this do? I noticed there are 3 states for this star symbol: off, outline and filled.
    The star, when toggled, bookmarks the thread for you.
    How long has that been used? Don’t tell me it’s always been there!
  • Reply 4 of 13
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,773administrator
    Question for mods regarding the site... I must’ve missed this previously, but I just noticed the little tappable star next to the story headline. What does this do? I noticed there are 3 states for this star symbol: off, outline and filled.
    The star, when toggled, bookmarks the thread for you.
    How long has that been used? Don’t tell me it’s always been there!
    AFAIK, since the last major update over a year ago.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 5 of 13
    This feature does not seem to be available worldwide, at least I don't see it here in New Zealand. Is this the case? Is it only US at the moment?

    Probably never see it here in NZ given we still don't have TV Shows or News but also because the software systems in the health sector are pathetic. Mind you neither are the legal systems. I remember a project in 2005/2006 where I was installing brand new machines with Windows 2000. Over 10 years since M$ stopped supporting it.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 6 of 13
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,773administrator
    This feature does not seem to be available worldwide, at least I don't see it here in New Zealand. Is this the case? Is it only US at the moment?

    Probably never see it here in NZ given we still don't have TV Shows or News but also because the software systems in the health sector are pathetic. Mind you neither are the legal systems. I remember a project in 2005/2006 where I was installing brand new machines with Windows 2000. Over 10 years since M$ stopped supporting it.
    Just the US at present.
  • Reply 7 of 13
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,291member
    Sweet, my provider is participating, I just migrating all my test results and vitals over from my provider’s instance of the MyChart app into the iOS Health app. Now if I switch to another provider I won’t lose all my data history nor have to maintain my own typed copies in Notes or whatever. 

    Now we just need more clinics getting onboard...
    libertyforall
  • Reply 8 of 13
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,101member
    This will be awesome when it's more universal. Polyclinic uses a crappy "MyChart" app and website both of which are barely useable. I'd love to see it be able to import say blood panels and graph results over time and such like with other health metrics. 
    libertyforall
  • Reply 9 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,955member
    It looks like this is feature is facing the same challenges as Apple Pay when it was first rolled out:  Getting providers to sign on.  But it will get there, no doubt.

    But, for me anyway, the whole thing has a fatal flaw that I do not think Apple can or will correct:
    Significant pieces of my health care data are either incorrect or out of date.  For example: 
    I have a diagnosis of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Yet I  have haven't had either for 4 years -- ever since I adopted a healthy diet. 
    Another is angina -- which I haven't had for 5 years since I started a serious exercise program.
    There are other errors such as a medication that was added erroneously.

    Apple says to contact your health care provider if any corrections are needed.  And, over the years I have done that -- with zero success.  What is added to the health record tends to stay there.  And, aside from being out of date and simply wrong, many diagnosis are simply added in order to satisfy an insurance requirement so they can get paid.

    So, frankly, at this point.  I am better off with paper copies of lab tests and images that I share on an as-needed basis.
    And besides, if I want to see my records, I can simply go to MyChart for the particular provider -- so it's not like those records are not already easily available.

    But, one area that can be very helpful and accurate is Lab Tests -- where it can collect and consolidate lab tests from multiple labs.   That should be both accurate and helpful.

    And again, this is not to trash Apple.  Instead, they are trying to organize a pile of random garbage -- and there's only so much they can do there...
    (And, by the way, I am a healthcare professional -- so I know and understand that system from both sides)
  • Reply 10 of 13
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,291member
    It looks like this is feature is facing the same challenges as Apple Pay when it was first rolled out:  Getting providers to sign on.  But it will get there, no doubt.

    But, for me anyway, the whole thing has a fatal flaw that I do not think Apple can or will correct:
    Significant pieces of my health care data are either incorrect or out of date.  For example: 
    I have a diagnosis of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Yet I  have haven't had either for 4 years -- ever since I adopted a healthy diet. 
    Another is angina -- which I haven't had for 5 years since I started a serious exercise program.
    There are other errors such as a medication that was added erroneously.

    Apple says to contact your health care provider if any corrections are needed.  And, over the years I have done that -- with zero success.  What is added to the health record tends to stay there.  And, aside from being out of date and simply wrong, many diagnosis are simply added in order to satisfy an insurance requirement so they can get paid.

    So, frankly, at this point.  I am better off with paper copies of lab tests and images that I share on an as-needed basis.. 
    It just came out yesterday, so it’s quite unreasonable to say it “is” facing the same challenges as AP. Will it? Maybe, who knows. But it only just came out to users 24 hours ago. 

    As for your example of a fault — old diagnosis’ being listed...that’s not a bug. It is part of your medical history, regardless if you’ve treated it since then. It’s still on your paper file too, somewhere. 

    Fail to see how youre “better off with paper”. This follows me and is far easier to recall and I needn’t worry about which doctor or clinic I saw to get the results. Once it’s in wider use anyway. 
  • Reply 11 of 13
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,101member
    It looks like this is feature is facing the same challenges as Apple Pay when it was first rolled out:  Getting providers to sign on.  But it will get there, no doubt.

    But, for me anyway, the whole thing has a fatal flaw that I do not think Apple can or will correct:
    Significant pieces of my health care data are either incorrect or out of date.  For example: 
    I have a diagnosis of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Yet I  have haven't had either for 4 years -- ever since I adopted a healthy diet. 
    Another is angina -- which I haven't had for 5 years since I started a serious exercise program.
    There are other errors such as a medication that was added erroneously.

    Apple says to contact your health care provider if any corrections are needed.  And, over the years I have done that -- with zero success.  What is added to the health record tends to stay there.  And, aside from being out of date and simply wrong, many diagnosis are simply added in order to satisfy an insurance requirement so they can get paid.

    So, frankly, at this point.  I am better off with paper copies of lab tests and images that I share on an as-needed basis.
    And besides, if I want to see my records, I can simply go to MyChart for the particular provider -- so it's not like those records are not already easily available.

    But, one area that can be very helpful and accurate is Lab Tests -- where it can collect and consolidate lab tests from multiple labs.   That should be both accurate and helpful.

    And again, this is not to trash Apple.  Instead, they are trying to organize a pile of random garbage -- and there's only so much they can do there...
    (And, by the way, I am a healthcare professional -- so I know and understand that system from both sides)
    Not sure what you mean, isn't the point to compile your medical history which would include all past diagnoses? If your blood pressure and cholesterol have improved, those metrics in your health app should reflect that over time, for example.

    And MyChart is just terrible, both the app and website look and behave like they were designed in the 90's. A perfect place for Apple to come in and clean up the mess. :)
    edited March 2018
  • Reply 12 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,955member
    It looks like this is feature is facing the same challenges as Apple Pay when it was first rolled out:  Getting providers to sign on.  But it will get there, no doubt.

    But, for me anyway, the whole thing has a fatal flaw that I do not think Apple can or will correct:
    Significant pieces of my health care data are either incorrect or out of date.  For example: 
    I have a diagnosis of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Yet I  have haven't had either for 4 years -- ever since I adopted a healthy diet. 
    Another is angina -- which I haven't had for 5 years since I started a serious exercise program.
    There are other errors such as a medication that was added erroneously.

    Apple says to contact your health care provider if any corrections are needed.  And, over the years I have done that -- with zero success.  What is added to the health record tends to stay there.  And, aside from being out of date and simply wrong, many diagnosis are simply added in order to satisfy an insurance requirement so they can get paid.

    So, frankly, at this point.  I am better off with paper copies of lab tests and images that I share on an as-needed basis.
    And besides, if I want to see my records, I can simply go to MyChart for the particular provider -- so it's not like those records are not already easily available.

    But, one area that can be very helpful and accurate is Lab Tests -- where it can collect and consolidate lab tests from multiple labs.   That should be both accurate and helpful.

    And again, this is not to trash Apple.  Instead, they are trying to organize a pile of random garbage -- and there's only so much they can do there...
    (And, by the way, I am a healthcare professional -- so I know and understand that system from both sides)
    Not sure what you mean, isn't the point to compile your medical history which would include all past diagnoses? If your blood pressure and cholesterol have improved, those metrics in your health app should reflect that over time, for example.

    And MyChart is just terrible, both the app and website look and behave like they were designed in the 90's. A perfect place for Apple to come in and clean up the mess. :)
    One would think so....  But no....  There is simply a Diagnosis of "hypertension"...  
  • Reply 13 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,955member
    It looks like this is feature is facing the same challenges as Apple Pay when it was first rolled out:  Getting providers to sign on.  But it will get there, no doubt.

    But, for me anyway, the whole thing has a fatal flaw that I do not think Apple can or will correct:
    Significant pieces of my health care data are either incorrect or out of date.  For example: 
    I have a diagnosis of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  Yet I  have haven't had either for 4 years -- ever since I adopted a healthy diet. 
    Another is angina -- which I haven't had for 5 years since I started a serious exercise program.
    There are other errors such as a medication that was added erroneously.

    Apple says to contact your health care provider if any corrections are needed.  And, over the years I have done that -- with zero success.  What is added to the health record tends to stay there.  And, aside from being out of date and simply wrong, many diagnosis are simply added in order to satisfy an insurance requirement so they can get paid.

    So, frankly, at this point.  I am better off with paper copies of lab tests and images that I share on an as-needed basis.. 
    It just came out yesterday, so it’s quite unreasonable to say it “is” facing the same challenges as AP. Will it? Maybe, who knows. But it only just came out to users 24 hours ago. 

    As for your example of a fault — old diagnosis’ being listed...that’s not a bug. It is part of your medical history, regardless if you’ve treated it since then. It’s still on your paper file too, somewhere. 

    Fail to see how youre “better off with paper”. This follows me and is far easier to recall and I needn’t worry about which doctor or clinic I saw to get the results. Once it’s in wider use anyway. 
    You fail to see that because you either didn't read what I wrote or ignored it.

    The problem with dumping garbage data into the Apple health record is not the fault of Apple.  It's the fault of our health care system where electronic medical records were designed and built to facilitate billing rather than promote health.  So, the old saw applies one more time:  GIGO (Garbage in -- Garbage out).

    Therefor you're better off with paper because with paper incorrect or obsolete data can be excluded when presenting information.  You can't do that when you simply dump one electronic medical record into another.
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