Compared: 2018 iPad versus the Acer Chromebook 11 in the school

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 56
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,552member
    The problem is NOT the hardware.
    The problem is that Apple simply doesn't have the software that schools need for teachers and students to work together.
    Google HAS THE SOFTWARE. Apple ironically does not.

    What software are you referring to?
    magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 56
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 6,552member
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    How many of the chromebooks are just laptop form factor vs a tablet designed for drawing with? As a child I did a lot more creative work drawing than I did keying in spreadsheets on a laptop. 
    edited April 2018 magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,808member
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    How many of the chromebooks are just laptop form factor vs a tablet designed for drawing with? As a child I did a lot more creative work drawing than I did keying in spreadsheets on a laptop. 
    There's a plethora of Chromebooks for education, some better suited for the very youngest students and more touch and pencil friendly (and convertible to tablet format) and some a better match for the older ones who will need to do more typing than drawing. Sometimes one device doesn't fit all. 
    https://edu.google.com/k-12-solutions/chromebooks/
    edited April 2018
  • Reply 24 of 56
    LatkoLatko Posts: 199member
    The problem is NOT the hardware.
    The problem is that Apple simply doesn't have the software that schools need for teachers and students to work together.
    Google HAS THE SOFTWARE. Apple ironically does not.

    What software are you referring to?
    G suite and other Google tools. No single institute is to repeat that with Apple-only server solutions tht break or are incomptabible with content- and exam provisioning and distribution
  • Reply 25 of 56

    I’ve read a lot of such comparisons lately but most missed the point. It’s not about the hardware or the apps but the environment as a whole. Google is the only one who can offer a comprehensive platform from apps to storage and management tools for teachers, with easy integration with YouTube, easy links, etc. 

    Apple, like their failure in Maps, Siri, etc. has too much to catch up with. To start with they never seriously develop the iWork web platform and no package to for teachers and students to manage their calendars, exercises, etc. And given the failed examples listed above (and various others) I wonder the existing administration at Apple under Tim Cook know what to do. 
    Apple Maps is caught up and good enough for most  
    I think you are talking about US. If Apple sells their products ONLY in US, then your comment would be valid. What about the rest of the world?
  • Reply 26 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,808member
    Latko said:
    The problem is NOT the hardware.
    The problem is that Apple simply doesn't have the software that schools need for teachers and students to work together.
    Google HAS THE SOFTWARE. Apple ironically does not.

    What software are you referring to?
    G suite and other Google tools. No single institute is to repeat that with Apple-only server solutions tht break or are incomptabible with content- and exam provisioning and distribution
    I think Apple has a plan for that: They'll combine Google's GSuite education tools with their iPad initiative, and begin doing so this year.
  • Reply 27 of 56
    irelandireland Posts: 17,528member
    It’s deployment and management where Google is leagues ahead of Apple. Apple need to provide a turnkey solution for education where they provide all the services required for a school or school district’s needs.
  • Reply 28 of 56
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,623member
    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    I've long wondered if Apple should bring back the polycarbonate bodies for less expensive phones and iPads like on the 5C with multiple colors.  More appealing for students.   And hopefully Apple could get the education iPad down to $269 or less.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 56
    Latko said:
    There is more to the puzzle than just the device perspective. The Edu program leadership at Apple must be suffering from a strange syndrome not to see what a chromebook costs, what the impact of Google's product-, content-, exam provisioning is, how its program and process mgt. work via G-suite and other tools that have lead to a Chromified world. Apple's offering, apart from some $100 price decrease, didn't change anything from its former position where it was unable to compete. No single Institute will ever give up G-suite for Classroom, unless it has become completely iPad-only (maybe a few Art schools) No mixed environment will ever standardize on iCloud or Apples' Classroom tools - as content distribution for Apple is a mismatch with mainstream. Apple is isolating itself by its walled garden - that is a burden here, as in any other mixed environment. Therefore, the only one benefiting from today's offering is that singular, rich iPad schoolkid on the first row in a Chromified world - that will never become the norm and won't notice nor need the $100 discount because its parents will be paying anyway. "What's a computer ?" Apple can't explain her and she'll migrate to Chrome before completely getting disconnected from the school programming. Bye.
    Lol . Please stop spreading nonsense.
    magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 56
    I have a suggestion. Why cannot schools sell old Apple devices,like old iPads? This should help fund their upgrades.
    Apple devices hold value, a lot better than other devices 
    magman1979watto_cobraforgot username
  • Reply 31 of 56
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,729member
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 32 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,808member
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 33 of 56
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,108member
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    And with that one quote you've proven not only how ignorant you are, but also how biased you are against Apple and how pro-Google, even though it has been proven how Apple iPad is a far superior creative tool than ChomeCrap, AGAIN and AGAIN...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 56
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,108member
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    Nice ad-hominem attack to deflect against valid points made by Macxpress, your typical BS.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 35 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,808member
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    Nice ad-hominem attack to deflect against valid points made by Macxpress, your typical BS.
    I wasn't the one claiming BS, nor the one tossing around ad-homs like "you've proven not only how ignorant you are...". By doing so you're offering doubt that you recognize personal insults when you see them. 

    So anyway which "valid points" of MacExpress are you referring to, and which of my points in reply was demonstratively not valid? You're not being terribly specific. I can find prodigious evidence from actual educators in this very thread that would be counter to your claim that  "it has been proven how Apple iPad is a far superior creative tool than ChomeCrap".

    Intentionally misspelling names doesn't make what you write appear more intelligent, and makes it so much easier to dismiss your opinion as one grounded more in anger and personalities than in thoughtfulness IMO even if you might not realize it.
    edited April 2018 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 36 of 56
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,108member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    Nice ad-hominem attack to deflect against valid points made by Macxpress, your typical BS.
    I wasn't the one claiming BS.
    Oh give it a rest, you tried to deflect Macxpress' statements of fact about performance of the iPad vs a POS Chromebook, and the fact iPad has far more creative apps and abilities than Google's garbage, and you did so by attacking his spelling mistakes. That is a classic ad-hominem attack!

    Did you ever stop to consider the fact that perhaps English is not this person's first language, or maybe he was typing on a mobile device and made an innocent mistake? Nice of you to attack that and claim his points are BS that way.
    edited April 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 37 of 56
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,108member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    Nice ad-hominem attack to deflect against valid points made by Macxpress, your typical BS.
    I wasn't the one claiming BS, nor the one tossing around ad-homs like "you've proven not only how ignorant you are...".

    So anyway which "valid points" of MacExpress are you referring to, and which of my points in reply was demonstratively not valid? You're not being terribly specific.
    Again going with ad-hominem attacks, attacking the person instead of the position, you're a master at it! And this has been demonstrated time and time again.

    I won't pander to your level, the statements made speak for themselves.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 38 of 56
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,808member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    Nice ad-hominem attack to deflect against valid points made by Macxpress, your typical BS.
    I wasn't the one claiming BS.
    Oh give it a rest, you tried to deflect Macxpress' statements of fact about performance of the iPad vs a POS Chromebook, and the fact iPad has far more creative apps and abilities than Google's garbage, and you did so by attacking his spelling mistakes. That is a classic ad-hominem attack!

    Did you ever stop to consider the fact that perhaps English is not this person's first language, or maybe he was typing on a mobile device and made an innocent mistake? Nice of you to attack that and claim his points are BS that way.
    His misspelling was plainly intentional, even if it might be perceived as unnecessary and poor debating style. First or third or fifth language has nothing to do with it, which should always be overlooked and forgiven if that's the reason for grammatical error.

    I also saw no "statements of fact about performance" from him unless you're referring to "run rings around" as a technical specification.

    If you have some specific point to discuss other than simply attacking me 'cause you've nothing better to do please proceed. Otherwise you're not adding anything to the conversation and for a casual visitor your responses reflect poorly on Apple fans in general IMO. Apple users are supposed to be smarter than the average bear.
    edited April 2018 muthuk_vanalingamcrowley
  • Reply 39 of 56
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,108member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    macxpress said:

    The cost to schools isn't just the hardware. It's also the support and upkeep. That's not any different than in the corporate world, where cheaper hardware isn't necessarily the best choice from a financial perspective.
    Sure.

    But, when a school gets a quote from Acer that says $312 per seat, and one from Apple that says $499 a seat, including support, which is going to get picked?
    $312 wins by a landslide when multiplied by a hundred(s) students/devices. Clearly, Apple isn't playing to win the market. Apple is only hoping to appeal to some smaller niche market which doesn't have low cost as the main priority. I do believe some school systems will choose the iPad but it will be very few. Maybe Apple is happy with that because they won't have to take a large financial hit. I think most of this world is made up of Chromebook users who aren't looking to be inspired. They'd rather just get the job done and call it a day. I get it. Maybe Apple also gets it. Apple could just be satisfied with even a half-hearted attempt at trying to reach those students and teachers who want to be inspired. Apple is saying that if you want to learn the Apple way, you have to pay extra. That's just how it is in this life. You always stand a better chance with deeper pockets.
    Education is a completely different area to work in. It requires TONS of effort, training and yes, creativity. If you don't engage students they won't be apt to learn anything. Maybe schools in your area don't get this so this is what you see and think all schools are like. You can't just have students read and write papers all day long. They will get bored, they will get frustrated and in the end, simply won't care anymore. Crapbooks provide no creativity at all, but rather just reading and writing tools. Schools need more than just reading and writing tools. They need creativity tools.
    iPads provide no creativity at all. That comes from the educators and parents and flows out from the students they motivate. Chromebooks are just as capable of being creative devices as iPads. 
    2 words...Bull shit! Crapbooks can't do much of anything beyond the Google Suite. iPads can't run circles around a Crapbook. 
    Since you're having an issue with spelling I'm not convinced you're an educator with any insight into it. BTW, I would agree with you that for many educational tasks an "iPad can't run circles around a (ahem...) Chromebook." just as you've said, but I'm no educator either. ;)
    Nice ad-hominem attack to deflect against valid points made by Macxpress, your typical BS.
    I wasn't the one claiming BS.
    Oh give it a rest, you tried to deflect Macxpress' statements of fact about performance of the iPad vs a POS Chromebook, and the fact iPad has far more creative apps and abilities than Google's garbage, and you did so by attacking his spelling mistakes. That is a classic ad-hominem attack!

    Did you ever stop to consider the fact that perhaps English is not this person's first language, or maybe he was typing on a mobile device and made an innocent mistake? Nice of you to attack that and claim his points are BS that way.
    His misspelling was plainly intentional, even if it might be perceived as juvenile. First or third language has nothing to do with it.

    If you have some specific point to discuss other than simply attacking me 'cause you've nothing better to do please proceed. Otherwise you're not adding anything to the conversation and for a casual visitor your responses reflect poorly on Apple fans in general IMO. Apple users are supposed to be smarter than the average bear.
    OMG, are you for real??? Clearly intentional??? If ever there was a more idiotic position to take, you just took it! You're taking someone's spelling mistake, or language issue, as validation of your position???

    Forgive me as I go and laugh my ass off at you in the corner!

    "for a casual visitor your responses reflect poorly on Apple fans in general IMO. Apple users are supposed to be smarter than the average bear"

    Another ad-hominem attack! You're full of them, as always! So here I am pointing out your strategy in attempting to deflect valid points made against you and your statements by others here, and all you do is underscore those attempts and try to use them against me, and launch additional attacks against "Apple users".

    Let me explain something to you... Apple users have been hearing BS from people like you for DECADES, and you know what? Eventually we get tired of hearing the same old pedantic, fallacy-laced crap, and call you people out on it. If you want to try and discredit us for it, guess what, it just validates what we say, and makes you look even more foolish.

    You always attempt to cherry pick facts, as illustrated by the links you always dig up which make every attempt to shine a positive light on Google, even though they are mostly discredited in reality, but you stick to it, continue your ad-hominem attacks and Google defensiveness, and then attack those Apple users who call you out on it.

    You know what that makes you? A Google troll.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 40 of 56
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,094member
    Interesting comparison. The price savings on the Chromebook is eliminated when you equalize the storage, and in every single other area (except built-in keyboard), the iPad smokes this thing. I do agree, however, that as long as you’re okay with the Google data-harvesting ecosystem (don’t even try to pull that BS about how student accounts aren’t harvested, we both know better), the Google system is at least as functional and well-run as the Apple system wrt to education so far.

    I think the best comment thus far is about how the iPads foster creativity and inspiration, whereas the Chromebooks are the Windows “future cubicle occupant” machines of the current generation..

    The sad reality is too many schools train for the latter, rather than letting early education (in particular) be a place to foster passion and creativity. If I had school-age kids and any sort of means to choose, however, I know that which system the school went with would tell me a lot about how they view their students and what the expectations are for them, and would weigh heavily on my choice of where to put the kids for the best chance at success and growth in their lives.
    magman1979watto_cobra
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